Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

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C
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Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 25 Aug 2021, 15:17

Chances are that you opened this thread and you know the significance of the title and you have an interest

One of my daily pleasures, living in Kent, is seeing Spitfire's flying over our house/garden tracing the Battle of Britain route from nearby Headcorn Aerodrome (Kent) or North Weald Airfield (Essex - just across the Thames)

Sometimes there are two but one of them is always one with 'invasion stripes' which is a bonus.

Image

For those still with me:

What are the significance of 'invasion stripes'...?

What is the difference between an airfield, Aerodrome and airport...?

I was a corporal in the Air Training Corps (ATC) over half a century ago - hence my interest.

Book your trip here:

https://www.aerolegends.co.uk/experienc ... dEQAvD_BwE

pip pip




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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby souphound » 25 Aug 2021, 16:04

C wrote:Chances are that you opened this thread and you know the significance of the title and you have an interest

One of my daily pleasures, living in Kent, is seeing Spitfire's flying over our house/garden tracing the Battle of Britain route from nearby Headcorn Aerodrome (Kent) or North Weald Airfield (Essex - just across the Thames)

Sometimes there are two but one of them is always one with 'invasion stripes' which is a bonus.

Image

For those still with me:

What are the significance of 'invasion stripes'...?

What is the difference between an airfield, Aerodrome and airport...?

I was a corporal in the Air Training Corps (ATC) over half a century ago - hence my interest.

Book your trip here:

https://www.aerolegends.co.uk/experienc ... dEQAvD_BwE

pip pip




.


Purely out of my league here, but:

Are invasion stripes what we know as camouflage paint? (I'm guessing not)

Airport is clear and I think I know what an airfield is without knowing the exact definition. What is the distinction between an aerodrome and the others?

Maybe you could give us a flyover (please pardon the pun)?

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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby pcqgod » 25 Aug 2021, 17:02

Beautiful plane, though I am also partial to Hawker Hurricanes. I've never known the significance of the markings.
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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Deebank » 25 Aug 2021, 17:37

I believe the stripes were simply to make it easier to identify allied aircraft - bearing in mind there were a number of different air forces involved in d day.
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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Samoan » 25 Aug 2021, 17:37

I digress but is it akin to the Dazzle Ships which fascinate me.
They also did it with planes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage
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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Tom Waits For No One » 25 Aug 2021, 19:48

Invasion stripes were as Deebank says to reduce the chance that they would be attacked by friendly forces during and after the Normandy Landings.
(See wikipedia)

On a 'dazzle' note, it's been my pleasure to take many a journey on this over the past few years

Image

Info here

https://www.merseyferries.co.uk/our-fer ... zle-ferry/
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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Deebank » 25 Aug 2021, 19:58

Tom Waits For No One wrote:Invasion stripes were as Deebank says to reduce the chance that they would be attacked by friendly forces during and after the Normandy Landings.
(See wikipedia)

On a 'dazzle' note, it's been my pleasure to take many a journey on this over the past few years

Image

Info here

https://www.merseyferries.co.uk/our-fer ... zle-ferry/


Is there any connection to OMD?
They are local and had an LP called Dazzle Ships IIRC.
I've been talking about writing a book - 25 years of TEFL - for a few years now. I've got it in me.

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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Tom Waits For No One » 25 Aug 2021, 20:05

Deebank wrote:Is there any connection to OMD?
They are local and had an LP called Dazzle Ships IIRC.


They did but no direct connection to the ferry, unless it going over the water to Birkenhead counts :D

The ferry is a Peter Blake paint job, very impressive it is too.
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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Positive Passion » 25 Aug 2021, 20:24

Aerodrome is the set, the others are subsets.

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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Deebank » 26 Aug 2021, 09:45

Just up the road from where I used to live in Sussex was a small village called Coolham. As well as an interesting looking pub (we never went there) there was a huge - long - open space of cleared farmland which had been an 'Advanced Landing Ground' (ALG), built for D Day. I guess all the structures had been temporary and pre-fab, so there are no buildings but the layout of the airfield was still obvious in the landscape.

I have always found it fascinating looking for these derelict remains of WW2 in the UK landscape, they have a palpable weirdness, especially structures like the concrete listening dishes near Dungeness. There are a few eerie deserted camps on Anglesey where I grew up (isolated, hidden-away. You wonder what went on there) and we camped on a USAAF bomber airfield in the New Forrest a few years ago.

Some of the south coast defences are still visible - we used to spot the bunkers and concrete barriers at Cuckmere Haven near Eastbourne - and in St Leonards Forrest near Horsham you can still see the line of tank traps that were part of one of the 'stop lines' defending London. It certainly makes you wonder how these fairly modest but often ingenious precautions would have fared against the might of the Wehrmacht had the Fuhrer not decided that the USSR was the priority. :?


SOme of the stuff at Cuckmere Haven:

Image

Image
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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 26 Aug 2021, 22:43

Deebank wrote:I believe the stripes were simply to make it easier to identify allied aircraft - bearing in mind there were a number of different air forces involved in d day.


Correct = Normandy Landings



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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 26 Aug 2021, 22:47

pcqgod wrote: I am also partial to Hawker Hurricanes.


The Spitfire and the Messerschmitt 109 were pretty equal in terms of speed and agility, and both were faster than the Hurricane. The slightly larger Hurricane was an easier aircraft to fly and was effective against Luftwaffe bombers





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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 26 Aug 2021, 22:48

Samoan wrote:I digress but is it akin to the Dazzle Ships which fascinate me.
They also did it with planes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage


Yes - nice contribution



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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 26 Aug 2021, 22:50

Deebank wrote:Just up the road from where I used to live in Sussex was a small village called Coolham. As well as an interesting looking pub (we never went there) there was a huge - long - open space of cleared farmland which had been an 'Advanced Landing Ground' (ALG), built for D Day. I guess all the structures had been temporary and pre-fab, so there are no buildings but the layout of the airfield was still obvious in the landscape.

I have always found it fascinating looking for these derelict remains of WW2 in the UK landscape, they have a palpable weirdness, especially structures like the concrete listening dishes near Dungeness. There are a few eerie deserted camps on Anglesey where I grew up (isolated, hidden-away. You wonder what went on there) and we camped on a USAAF bomber airfield in the New Forrest a few years ago.

Some of the south coast defences are still visible - we used to spot the bunkers and concrete barriers at Cuckmere Haven near Eastbourne - and in St Leonards Forrest near Horsham you can still see the line of tank traps that were part of one of the 'stop lines' defending London. It certainly makes you wonder how these fairly modest but often ingenious precautions would have fared against the might of the Wehrmacht had the Fuhrer not decided that the USSR was the priority. :?


SOme of the stuff at Cuckmere Haven:

Image

Image


Thank you. Very interesting



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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby robertff » 27 Aug 2021, 08:26

I used to work in Biggin Hill C. and like you regularly saw Spitfires and their ilk flying over, pretty low at times as well. As a bonus also got to see many of the aeroplanes involved in the annual Biggin Hill Air Fair flying over for their practice runs and such. Saw this happen many times.

My sister lives in Wrotham and constantly sees the Spitfires, it can become a little irritating at times when you're sitting in the garden trying to eat lunch and have a catch up and they go roaring past.

:D


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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby KeithPratt » 27 Aug 2021, 09:00

I see the same plane over in Tunbridge Wells. It usually banks over our house most days.

The sound of a Rolls Royce Merlin is incredible, and paired with its beautiful shape and weighty history gives the Spitfire a tangible symbolism.

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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Deebank » 27 Aug 2021, 12:12

My grandfather was a machinist at Rolls Royce in Derby between the wars.
He machined the tappets for the prototype Merlin engines.

I've sat at many a business lunch in Germany with machinists ('Engineers' in Germany of course where these skills are more highly regarded and rewarded) at the table alongside all the upper echelons of management and started relating how my grandfather was a skilled machinist before it slowly dawning on me where this conversation would lead...

It is amazing how many different applications the engine had. Spitfires and Huricanes of course, but also Lancaster bombers and Mosquitos and also the most successful US fighter, the Mustang. In addition you have the engine powering torpedo boats and centurion tanks (after the war).

Edit: scratch that last one. I just saw this in WIkipedia:

Experiments were carried out by the Irish Army involving replacing the Bedford engine of a Churchill tank with a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine salvaged from an Irish Air Corps Seafire aircraft. The experiment was not a success, although the reasons are not recorded.[122]



Although...

A non-supercharged version of the Merlin using a larger proportion of steel and iron components was produced for use in tanks. This engine, the Rolls-Royce Meteor, in turn led to the smaller Rolls-Royce Meteorite.[119] In 1943, further Meteor development was handed over to Rover, in exchange for Rover's gas turbine interests.[120]

I've been talking about writing a book - 25 years of TEFL - for a few years now. I've got it in me.

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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby Deebank » 27 Aug 2021, 12:22

C wrote:
pcqgod wrote: I am also partial to Hawker Hurricanes.


The Spitfire and the Messerschmitt 109 were pretty equal in terms of speed and agility, and both were faster than the Hurricane. The slightly larger Hurricane was an easier aircraft to fly and was effective against Luftwaffe bombers





.



I just read that the Spanish built a version of the ME109 with a Rolls Royce Merlin engine!
I've been talking about writing a book - 25 years of TEFL - for a few years now. I've got it in me.

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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 27 Aug 2021, 16:47

Deebank wrote:My grandfather was a machinist at Rolls Royce in Derby between the wars.
He machined the tappets for the prototype Merlin engines.

I've sat at many a business lunch in Germany with machinists ('Engineers' in Germany of course where these skills are more highly regarded and rewarded) at the table alongside all the upper echelons of management and started relating how my grandfather was a skilled machinist before it slowly dawning on me where this conversation would lead...

It is amazing how many different applications the engine had. Spitfires and Huricanes of course, but also Lancaster bombers and Mosquitos and also the most successful US fighter, the Mustang. In addition you have the engine powering torpedo boats and centurion tanks (after the war).

Edit: scratch that last one. I just saw this in WIkipedia:

Experiments were carried out by the Irish Army involving replacing the Bedford engine of a Churchill tank with a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine salvaged from an Irish Air Corps Seafire aircraft. The experiment was not a success, although the reasons are not recorded.[122]



Although...

A non-supercharged version of the Merlin using a larger proportion of steel and iron components was produced for use in tanks. This engine, the Rolls-Royce Meteor, in turn led to the smaller Rolls-Royce Meteorite.[119] In 1943, further Meteor development was handed over to Rover, in exchange for Rover's gas turbine interests.[120]



Robust stuff



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Re: Supermarine Spitfire Mk I

Postby C » 27 Aug 2021, 16:47

Deebank wrote:
C wrote:
pcqgod wrote: I am also partial to Hawker Hurricanes.


The Spitfire and the Messerschmitt 109 were pretty equal in terms of speed and agility, and both were faster than the Hurricane. The slightly larger Hurricane was an easier aircraft to fly and was effective against Luftwaffe bombers





.



I just read that the Spanish built a version of the ME109 with a Rolls Royce Merlin engine!


:lol:



.
Matt Wilson wrote:
Lord Rother wrote:So what do you do to supplement your school teacher salary

I pole dance at the local titty bar.