Doug Ingle RIP

Do talk back
User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 27 May 2024, 20:28

Founder and organist, primary composer, and lead vocalist for the band Iron Butterfly. Ingle wrote the band's iconic song "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida", which was first released in 1968

Aged 78

RIP Doug




.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Walk In My Shadow
Hello Laydeez
Posts: 38784
Joined: 23 Jul 2003, 20:02
Location: The Good, the Bad, both ugly
Contact:

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 27 May 2024, 20:39

yeah, another one gone.

what do you expect, Stephen? we're all getting on in years so do the artists.

one of these days (years) it will be our turn.
Beneluxfunkmeisterlurvegod


Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 27 May 2024, 21:29

Walk In My Shadow wrote:yeah, another one gone.

what do you expect, Stephen? we're all getting on in years so do the artists.

one of these days (years) it will be our turn.


:D

Indeed my dear old friend

Indeed



.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 27 May 2024, 22:16

The last of the “classic” lineup to go.

*sigh*

R.I.P. and Thanks, Doug.
Image

User avatar
Matt Wilson
Psychedelic Cowpunk
Posts: 32639
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 20:18
Location: Edge of a continent

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Matt Wilson » 27 May 2024, 22:37

Jut read that they're about to start a tour.

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 27 May 2024, 23:02

Matt Wilson wrote:Jut read that they're about to start a tour.

Last I knew, the longest-serving touring member joined the group in 1995. (At that time, longtime drummer Ron Bushy - since deceased - was considered a member, but seldom actually performed.)
Image

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 27 May 2024, 23:05

I posted the bad news at “the other place” and loveless suggested “17 minutes of silence.” :mrgreen:
Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 28 May 2024, 10:55

Charlie O. wrote:I posted the bad news at “the other place” and loveless suggested “17 minutes of silence.” :mrgreen:


:lol:

I wonder if I am still banned...?

Link please Chas



.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Matt Wilson
Psychedelic Cowpunk
Posts: 32639
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 20:18
Location: Edge of a continent

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Matt Wilson » 28 May 2024, 14:32

C wrote:
Charlie O. wrote:I posted the bad news at “the other place” and loveless suggested “17 minutes of silence.” :mrgreen:


:lol:

I wonder if I am still banned...?

Link please Chas



.


I know I am. The last thing Coan wants is me fucking with him in his own house.

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 28 May 2024, 14:38

C wrote:
Charlie O. wrote:I posted the bad news at “the other place” and loveless suggested “17 minutes of silence.” :mrgreen:


:lol:

I wonder if I am still banned...?

Link please Chas
.

Sadly, I haven’t figured out how to do most links on my cell phone, which is what I am currently reduced to.

But yes, I’m sure you’re still banned. :lol:
Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 28 May 2024, 15:21

Charlie O. wrote:
C wrote:
Charlie O. wrote:I posted the bad news at “the other place” and loveless suggested “17 minutes of silence.” :mrgreen:


:lol:

I wonder if I am still banned...?

Link please Chas
.

Sadly, I haven’t figured out how to do most links on my cell phone, which is what I am currently reduced to.

But yes, I’m sure you’re still banned. :lol:


:lol:

https://preludin.proboards.com/board/1/music

I assume there is still a 'secret room' where they slag off Googs and The Prog Goons....?




.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 28 May 2024, 17:49

No comment.
Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 28 May 2024, 18:46

Charlie O. wrote:No comment.


:lol:

I'm sure the blaggards and sycophants that frequent both places, (present company excepted), report back to the boss.....!





:lol:
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 28 May 2024, 18:57

C wrote:I'm sure the blaggards and sycophants that frequent both places, (present company excepted), report back to the boss.....!

It really isn’t as bad as all that, generally (especially since Skope’s been gone) - just someone having the occasional vent. We actually had - probably still have, though I ain’t looking for it - a not-dissimilar thread here.
Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 28 May 2024, 19:24

Do you know why Scrote left?

It’s like Mike Ratledge being kicked out of his own band!




.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 28 May 2024, 20:42

The details are vague in my memory, but I think John kicked him out. I imagine he could have come back if he’d really wanted to, but he went and formed his own site where he rails against all of us.
Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 28 May 2024, 22:13

Charlie O. wrote:The details are vague in my memory, but I think John kicked him out. I imagine he could have come back if he’d really wanted to, but he went and formed his own site where he rails against all of us.



Yes, a sad case ( and the other ‘erbert)

Never mind, live and let live I say

They’re both harmless



.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Charlie O.
Posts: 45075
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:53
Location: In-A-Badda-La-Wadda, bay-beh

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Charlie O. » 31 May 2024, 03:33

I spent a not-inconsiderable chunk of 2023 immersed in Iron Butterfly. After promising myself for years, I finally put together a 2CD-R distillation of my favorite IB tracks in the best sound qualities available to me (I have bought their catalogue multiple times over the years); working something out of my system (and having fun in the process), I also wrote liner notes that virtually amounted to a small book on the band (thirteen chapters, plus Preface and Appendix).

I won't post the whole opus here (you're welcome), but here's the Preface, anyway:

They got me when I was young.

Late Summer 1968: my twelve-year-old brother Jim brings home a new 45 to play on his recently acquired General Electric “Wildcat” record player (or “the stereo,” to distinguish it from “the Hi-Fi,” the over-sized monophonic piece of furniture in the living room). I – two years old, soon to turn three – join him in his bedroom to listen to the record. The name of the band is Iron Butterfly; it wasn't so very long ago that I'd found out about The Beatles and thought THEY had a weird name, but I've since heard Cream and Strawberry Alarm Clock, so a name like “Iron Butterfly” doesn't seem so odd and I don't question it. I take an instant shine to “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” (I don't question that title, either), but the instrumental B-side “Iron Butterfly Theme” terrifies me. I'm standing there crying (with Jim trying to reassure me); that I have the option to simply leave the room either doesn't occur to me, or does but is somehow overruled. Soon enough, I will get over my fear, and learn to love doom metal.

Early 1969: I'm now three years old and accompanying my mom to some store or other which happens to have a Records department. Mom has little or no interest in records, but she's well aware of my fascination, so she allows me a little time there. The 45s are displayed in racks up on the wall. I spy one with the now-familiar yellow and white Atco Records label and sleeve and excitedly point to it, exclaiming “Iron Butterfly!” - the only recording act I associate with those designs. Improbably, the displayed record IS by Iron Butterfly, and my no doubt amused mother purchases “Soul Experience” b/w “In The Crowds” for me, making me one of the relatively few proud Americans to own the flop follow-up to the group's lone hit single. Brother Jim is impressed.

Late 1969 or early '70: Jim finally acquires the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida album. The long version of the title track is a revelation – I didn't know you could have one song covering a whole LP side, aren't there rules about that? – AND... it has a drum solo!! - the first one I've ever heard. (At this age, I especially ♥ drums.) I dig the shorter songs on the other side, too; my favorite is probably “Termination”, even though I have no idea what that word (which is misspelled on the back cover) means, let alone what the lyrics as a whole mean. (Half a century later, I will be little the wiser regarding those lyrics.) I'm now four years old and I have my own monophonic record player in my bedroom (which will soon be replaced by the GE Wildcat when Jim upgrades), and over the next few years I will borrow the LP from Jim so frequently that I will eventually just trade him a relatively fresh copy of The Beatles' Revolver for it. I will spend countless hours sitting on the floor of my room in front of the record player, playing the whole album while poring over the packaging - studying the photographs and liner notes on the cover, as well as the full-color inner sleeve advertising other mysterious artists and LPs “FROM THE ATCO CATALOGUE” (The Rose Garden! The Coasters! Mr. Acker Bilk! Bent Fabric!), even the design and font on the LP labels, as if they contained the deepest secrets of the universe...

2023: Just to clarify, I am not suggesting that In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida is better than Revolver, which is (sometimes) my favorite album by (always) my favorite band. Even when I made that trade with my brother in the early '70s, I don't think I would have made such a suggestion.

But I've never regretted that trade, either.

∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

Doug Ingle (1997): “The Butterfly was something of an oddity, because nobody could figure out what the hell it was, and nobody was neutral towards us. They still aren't.”

I've read the put-downs (and they are legion). I've heard the jokes - most of which I've enjoyed, especially the Simpsons ones (I love that someone on the show actually went to the trouble of transcribing at least part of the first organ solo). I know that for a lot of people Iron Butterfly and their calling card/albatross ARE a joke, and I can admit that it's not hard to see why: that naggingly repetitive unison riff... Doug Ingle's peculiar, love-it-or-hate-it vocal (described by writer and fan Calliope Kurtz as “Elvis Presley stoned on hash brownies”), and the way he delivers that gibberish title phrase as though imparting the deepest secrets of the universe... second verse, same as the first (a characteristic of many of their songs, actually)... the drum solo. While “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” the single only made it to #30 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1968 (it failed to get even that far in Cash Box or Record World), In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida the album was, for a few years, the best selling rock album EVER (or such has been claimed, anyway; I can neither confirm nor refute), and the seventeen minute title track was a longtime staple of FM rock radio (itself a fairly new phenomenon in 1968) - sort of the pre-”Stairway To Heaven” “Stairway To Heaven”. While that strongly suggests that millions of people liked it - as does the fact that, over the course of fifty-five years at this writing, the album has never even come close to going out of print - it also suggests the kind of cultural ubiquity that's apt to drive those other millions who were/are sadly immune to its charms slightly mad. And that's all perfectly understandable.

But In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, and much of the rest of their 1967-70 work, is musical comfort food for me, to a degree that relatively few other albums or bands can match.

I know enough to not think that anyone else (including you, dear reader) should feel as I do about this music; I'm reasonably content with this being just my little quirk. Even so, I do wish this much was more widely known and acknowledged: there's a lot more to this band than the neanderthal minimalism of their (let's call it what it ultimately was) novelty hit.

Iron Butterfly is routinely labeled a psychedelic or acid rock band; sometimes, they're just called “hard rock”; they're very frequently cited as progenitors or even the inventors of heavy metal. I'm shruggingly okay with all of that, as far as it goes - but those labels fail to take into account their more delicate, intricate side, the “Butterfly” part, if you will: how many hard rock or heavy metal bands have a “My Mirage” or a “Lonely Boy” or a “Slower Than Guns” up their sleeves?

We could also consider them an early prototype (though hardly the only one) for prog rock: the intricate contrapuntism of many of their arrangements, the subtle (and not-so-subtle) dynamic shifts, the dabbling in suite-like structures, and so on. I think it's not unreasonable to suggest that members-to-be of Yes, for example, might have been listening and taking notes.

The aforementioned Calliope Kurtz (formerly Barry Stoller) detects surf-rock roots in their sound – original guitarist Danny Weis and his replacement Erik Brann both deployed a Mosrite Ventures Mach I guitar and a Fuzzrite pedal (introduced on The Ventures' 1962 single “The 2,000 Pound Bee”) - and asks: “what is 'In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida' but the 'Wipe Out' for the Age of Aquarius?”

And then there's the Butterfly's sweet, romantic pop center; at the risk of unintentionally damning them, I'll note that songs like “Most Anything You Want” and “Flowers And Beads” could easily have been covered by, say, Bobby Sherman.

When Iron Butterfly played in London in 1971, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr were in attendance; afterwards, Ringo took drummer Ron Bushy out for drinks and said “I hope you don't mind that I stole part of your drum solo” (for his own brief turn in The Beatles' “The End”). According to at least a couple of IB members, Jimmy Page told them that the decision to call his band Led Zeppelin (heavy, yet light enough to take flight...) was partly inspired by Iron Butterfly's name (and enviable album-based success). Tom Scholz of Boston has cited “Iron Butterfly Theme” as “the song that got me interested in playing guitar.” Thijs van Leer of Focus often seemed to be channeling Doug Ingle when he unleashed his manic falsetto (although I don't think Ingle ever yodeled). And Black Sabbath obviously heard the likes of “Iron Butterfly Theme” and “In The Time Of Our Lives” and discovered their purpose in life.

And though some might consider this a stretch, I suspect that a fair number of distinctive punk and post-punk guitarists, from Ron Asheton to Johnny Thunders, Greg Ginn, Tom Morello and beyond, took some inspiration at some point from Erik Brann's smudgy fingerwork, exuberant neck SWOOPs, and joyful noises-for-noise's-sake.

I ask you: how many other bands can one find at the center of such a complex and unlikely Venn diagram?


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞
∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞
Image

User avatar
C
Robust
Posts: 80666
Joined: 22 Jul 2003, 19:06

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby C » 31 May 2024, 11:18

Charlie O. wrote:I spent a not-inconsiderable chunk of 2023 immersed in Iron Butterfly. After promising myself for years, I finally put together a 2CD-R distillation of my favorite IB tracks in the best sound qualities available to me (I have bought their catalogue multiple times over the years); working something out of my system (and having fun in the process), I also wrote liner notes that virtually amounted to a small book on the band (thirteen chapters, plus Preface and Appendix).

I won't post the whole opus here (you're welcome), but here's the Preface, anyway:

They got me when I was young.

Late Summer 1968: my twelve-year-old brother Jim brings home a new 45 to play on his recently acquired General Electric “Wildcat” record player (or “the stereo,” to distinguish it from “the Hi-Fi,” the over-sized monophonic piece of furniture in the living room). I – two years old, soon to turn three – join him in his bedroom to listen to the record. The name of the band is Iron Butterfly; it wasn't so very long ago that I'd found out about The Beatles and thought THEY had a weird name, but I've since heard Cream and Strawberry Alarm Clock, so a name like “Iron Butterfly” doesn't seem so odd and I don't question it. I take an instant shine to “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” (I don't question that title, either), but the instrumental B-side “Iron Butterfly Theme” terrifies me. I'm standing there crying (with Jim trying to reassure me); that I have the option to simply leave the room either doesn't occur to me, or does but is somehow overruled. Soon enough, I will get over my fear, and learn to love doom metal.

Early 1969: I'm now three years old and accompanying my mom to some store or other which happens to have a Records department. Mom has little or no interest in records, but she's well aware of my fascination, so she allows me a little time there. The 45s are displayed in racks up on the wall. I spy one with the now-familiar yellow and white Atco Records label and sleeve and excitedly point to it, exclaiming “Iron Butterfly!” - the only recording act I associate with those designs. Improbably, the displayed record IS by Iron Butterfly, and my no doubt amused mother purchases “Soul Experience” b/w “In The Crowds” for me, making me one of the relatively few proud Americans to own the flop follow-up to the group's lone hit single. Brother Jim is impressed.

Late 1969 or early '70: Jim finally acquires the In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida album. The long version of the title track is a revelation – I didn't know you could have one song covering a whole LP side, aren't there rules about that? – AND... it has a drum solo!! - the first one I've ever heard. (At this age, I especially ♥ drums.) I dig the shorter songs on the other side, too; my favorite is probably “Termination”, even though I have no idea what that word (which is misspelled on the back cover) means, let alone what the lyrics as a whole mean. (Half a century later, I will be little the wiser regarding those lyrics.) I'm now four years old and I have my own monophonic record player in my bedroom (which will soon be replaced by the GE Wildcat when Jim upgrades), and over the next few years I will borrow the LP from Jim so frequently that I will eventually just trade him a relatively fresh copy of The Beatles' Revolver for it. I will spend countless hours sitting on the floor of my room in front of the record player, playing the whole album while poring over the packaging - studying the photographs and liner notes on the cover, as well as the full-color inner sleeve advertising other mysterious artists and LPs “FROM THE ATCO CATALOGUE” (The Rose Garden! The Coasters! Mr. Acker Bilk! Bent Fabric!), even the design and font on the LP labels, as if they contained the deepest secrets of the universe...

2023: Just to clarify, I am not suggesting that In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida is better than Revolver, which is (sometimes) my favorite album by (always) my favorite band. Even when I made that trade with my brother in the early '70s, I don't think I would have made such a suggestion.

But I've never regretted that trade, either.

∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞

Doug Ingle (1997): “The Butterfly was something of an oddity, because nobody could figure out what the hell it was, and nobody was neutral towards us. They still aren't.”

I've read the put-downs (and they are legion). I've heard the jokes - most of which I've enjoyed, especially the Simpsons ones (I love that someone on the show actually went to the trouble of transcribing at least part of the first organ solo). I know that for a lot of people Iron Butterfly and their calling card/albatross ARE a joke, and I can admit that it's not hard to see why: that naggingly repetitive unison riff... Doug Ingle's peculiar, love-it-or-hate-it vocal (described by writer and fan Calliope Kurtz as “Elvis Presley stoned on hash brownies”), and the way he delivers that gibberish title phrase as though imparting the deepest secrets of the universe... second verse, same as the first (a characteristic of many of their songs, actually)... the drum solo. While “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” the single only made it to #30 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1968 (it failed to get even that far in Cash Box or Record World), In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida the album was, for a few years, the best selling rock album EVER (or such has been claimed, anyway; I can neither confirm nor refute), and the seventeen minute title track was a longtime staple of FM rock radio (itself a fairly new phenomenon in 1968) - sort of the pre-”Stairway To Heaven” “Stairway To Heaven”. While that strongly suggests that millions of people liked it - as does the fact that, over the course of fifty-five years at this writing, the album has never even come close to going out of print - it also suggests the kind of cultural ubiquity that's apt to drive those other millions who were/are sadly immune to its charms slightly mad. And that's all perfectly understandable.

But In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida, and much of the rest of their 1967-70 work, is musical comfort food for me, to a degree that relatively few other albums or bands can match.

I know enough to not think that anyone else (including you, dear reader) should feel as I do about this music; I'm reasonably content with this being just my little quirk. Even so, I do wish this much was more widely known and acknowledged: there's a lot more to this band than the neanderthal minimalism of their (let's call it what it ultimately was) novelty hit.

Iron Butterfly is routinely labeled a psychedelic or acid rock band; sometimes, they're just called “hard rock”; they're very frequently cited as progenitors or even the inventors of heavy metal. I'm shruggingly okay with all of that, as far as it goes - but those labels fail to take into account their more delicate, intricate side, the “Butterfly” part, if you will: how many hard rock or heavy metal bands have a “My Mirage” or a “Lonely Boy” or a “Slower Than Guns” up their sleeves?

We could also consider them an early prototype (though hardly the only one) for prog rock: the intricate contrapuntism of many of their arrangements, the subtle (and not-so-subtle) dynamic shifts, the dabbling in suite-like structures, and so on. I think it's not unreasonable to suggest that members-to-be of Yes, for example, might have been listening and taking notes.

The aforementioned Calliope Kurtz (formerly Barry Stoller) detects surf-rock roots in their sound – original guitarist Danny Weis and his replacement Erik Brann both deployed a Mosrite Ventures Mach I guitar and a Fuzzrite pedal (introduced on The Ventures' 1962 single “The 2,000 Pound Bee”) - and asks: “what is 'In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida' but the 'Wipe Out' for the Age of Aquarius?”

And then there's the Butterfly's sweet, romantic pop center; at the risk of unintentionally damning them, I'll note that songs like “Most Anything You Want” and “Flowers And Beads” could easily have been covered by, say, Bobby Sherman.

When Iron Butterfly played in London in 1971, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr were in attendance; afterwards, Ringo took drummer Ron Bushy out for drinks and said “I hope you don't mind that I stole part of your drum solo” (for his own brief turn in The Beatles' “The End”). According to at least a couple of IB members, Jimmy Page told them that the decision to call his band Led Zeppelin (heavy, yet light enough to take flight...) was partly inspired by Iron Butterfly's name (and enviable album-based success). Tom Scholz of Boston has cited “Iron Butterfly Theme” as “the song that got me interested in playing guitar.” Thijs van Leer of Focus often seemed to be channeling Doug Ingle when he unleashed his manic falsetto (although I don't think Ingle ever yodeled). And Black Sabbath obviously heard the likes of “Iron Butterfly Theme” and “In The Time Of Our Lives” and discovered their purpose in life.

And though some might consider this a stretch, I suspect that a fair number of distinctive punk and post-punk guitarists, from Ron Asheton to Johnny Thunders, Greg Ginn, Tom Morello and beyond, took some inspiration at some point from Erik Brann's smudgy fingerwork, exuberant neck SWOOPs, and joyful noises-for-noise's-sake.

I ask you: how many other bands can one find at the center of such a complex and unlikely Venn diagram?


∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞
∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞∞




Excellent Chas

Excellent




.
mudshark wrote:We don't give a shit about Blighty.
Y'all can use Yeovil for all I care

User avatar
Matt Wilson
Psychedelic Cowpunk
Posts: 32639
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 20:18
Location: Edge of a continent

Re: Doug Ingle RIP

Postby Matt Wilson » 31 May 2024, 14:37

You may as well post your tracklisting for the two-discs, Charlie.


Return to “Yakety Yak”