Roy Wood's solo work

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GoogaMooga
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Roy Wood's solo work

Postby GoogaMooga » 01 Feb 2024, 12:40

Hello! I bring greetings from Zilth Pilchards. He has forgotten his password, but would like to know what you all think of Roy Wood's solo work, specifically the albums "Boulders" and "Mustard", which he has been raving about the past couple of days. Funny thing is, he doesn't like The Move or Wizzard, he only likes Roy Wood solo, and he is trying to persuade me to give them a try.

I've only got one album by The Move, the one with the bald-headed guys shot from above. So I am in no position to really have an opinion of him either way.
"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

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robertff
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby robertff » 01 Feb 2024, 16:03

GoogaMooga wrote:Hello! I bring greetings from Zilth Pilchards. He has forgotten his password, but would like to know what you all think of Roy Wood's solo work, specifically the albums "Boulders" and "Mustard", which he has been raving about the past couple of days. Funny thing is, he doesn't like The Move or Wizzard, he only likes Roy Wood solo, and he is trying to persuade me to give them a try.

I've only got one album by The Move, the one with the bald-headed guys shot from above. So I am in no position to really have an opinion of him either way.




Got both Boulders and Mustard, in fact played one before Christmas and posted it on Reap Corner.

Not a fan I'm afraid, both albums are rather patchy, quirky and a more than a little eccentric but not in a pleasing way. Bought both LPs very cheaply on the strength of his Move career and not likely to play either again, until I have forgotten what they sound like and play them again to remind myself.

Wouldn't recommend them.


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C
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby C » 01 Feb 2024, 17:06

Is that Victoria’s brother….?


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ChrisB
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby ChrisB » 01 Feb 2024, 17:23

No, he's Ronnie's far more talented cousin

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GoogaMooga
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby GoogaMooga » 01 Feb 2024, 18:32

Thanks for the feedback. Yes, he likes quirky music, I mean, the man likes Kevin Ayers, if you get my drift. I'll check out the two albums on youtube, just to hear what all the fuss is about.
Last edited by GoogaMooga on 01 Feb 2024, 20:42, edited 1 time in total.
"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby naughty boy » 01 Feb 2024, 20:32

Hang on.

Roy Wood is something of a songwriting genius. His work with the Move and Wizzard was mostly fabulous, and although I haven't been able to find a way into Mustard (there are others here who don't have cloth ears who could write something more persuasive than I ever could about that one), Boulders is a wonderful album that you would be well advised to spend some time with.

I mean....if this doesn't lift your soul then there's no hope for you.

Matt 'interesting' Wilson wrote:So I went from looking at the "I'm a Man" riff, to showing how the rave up was popular for awhile.

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GoogaMooga
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby GoogaMooga » 01 Feb 2024, 20:41

Well, that is instantly likeable and very catchy, I'll look out for Boulders.
"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby Lord Rother » 01 Feb 2024, 20:45

“Forever” is a delightful slice of pop pie.

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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby ChrisB » 01 Feb 2024, 21:17

Such an enigma ...brilliant pop with the Move and Wizzard, a little more cerebral with ELO, a real mixed bag with his solo work and then, ......late 70's onwards .... nothing. No more hits although plenty of releases

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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby Neige » 02 Feb 2024, 07:07

Boulders is a mixed bag in a "Look how many instruments and styles I can play" way, but I find it enjoyable throughout.

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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby The Slider » 12 Feb 2024, 00:17

The Move's records are pretty much great from start to finish
Wizzard's are not
Boulders is a 5 star album and Mustard probably a 4.



Complete Ramones Mp3 set on its way

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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby Quaco » 22 Feb 2024, 03:45

Boulders is his Rubber Soul - tasteful and very creative, with a tuneful acoustic bent, and is good any time.

Mustard is his Pepper (one of the few Peppers to deserve that epithet, IMO). Wide-screen, full color, and at times too much crammed onto the tape. I don't always love Pepper and I can understand why some people don't dig Mustard quite as much. You might reserve it for special occasions.

Something I wrote about Mustard on the "other site":
Brian Wilson writes and sings a brilliant album. That's genius. John Coltrane plays one instrument for 40 minutes and that is genius too. This album features such a sustained level of genius, mixing and matching upwards of 30 instruments all played by the man himself, plus vocals of every shape and size, in outrageous, bold, complex, and colorful arrangements. It is truly jaw-dropping. The label must have dropped the ball on this, not realizing what they had on their hands. The vinyl LP didn't do the work justice, and it comes across much better on CD. Perhaps the songs may be more like 8/10 — he has written better — but the execution is staggering. An 11/10.


With the caveat that, to like it, you should probably like pop music of many kinds. It ain't Coltrane!

Here is the first song, a mere aperitif. Remember, this is all Roy, even the crowd noise:

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Quaco
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby Quaco » 22 Feb 2024, 06:10

GoogaMooga wrote:Hello! I bring greetings from Zilth Pilchards. He has forgotten his password, but would like to know what you all think of Roy Wood's solo work, specifically the albums "Boulders" and "Mustard", which he has been raving about the past couple of days. Funny thing is, he doesn't like The Move or Wizzard, he only likes Roy Wood solo, and he is trying to persuade me to give them a try.

I've only got one album by The Move, the one with the bald-headed guys shot from above. So I am in no position to really have an opinion of him either way.

That Move LP is the least accessible of the four, by a long shot. Lugubrious and overlong songs. Any of the other three would be better entry points to The Move.

First one is English power pop of a high calibre, similar to '66-'68 Who.

The second one, Shazam, is probably the easiest to get into - good structure (side one is original, side two is reimagined covers), only six songs in all, all of a very high quality.

(The third one is the one with the bald heads.)

The fourth one has Jeff Lynne added and in fine form. A well-balanced finale for the band, with Wood and Lynne both writing good and creative songs.

Like The Who, they also have a lot of single-only tracks that are worth a shot. "I Can Hear the Grass Grow", "Blackberry Way", "Tonight", "Chinatown", "California Man" and (the original) "Do Ya" are all top-tier stuff.
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Re: Roy Wood's solo work

Postby robertff » 22 Feb 2024, 10:19

Quaco wrote:
GoogaMooga wrote:Hello! I bring greetings from Zilth Pilchards. He has forgotten his password, but would like to know what you all think of Roy Wood's solo work, specifically the albums "Boulders" and "Mustard", which he has been raving about the past couple of days. Funny thing is, he doesn't like The Move or Wizzard, he only likes Roy Wood solo, and he is trying to persuade me to give them a try.

I've only got one album by The Move, the one with the bald-headed guys shot from above. So I am in no position to really have an opinion of him either way.

That Move LP is the least accessible of the four, by a long shot. Lugubrious and overlong songs. Any of the other three would be better entry points to The Move.

First one is English power pop of a high calibre, similar to '66-'68 Who.

The second one, Shazam, is probably the easiest to get into - good structure (side one is original, side two is reimagined covers), only six songs in all, all of a very high quality.

(The third one is the one with the bald heads.)

The fourth one has Jeff Lynne added and in fine form. A well-balanced finale for the band, with Wood and Lynne both writing good and creative songs.

Like The Who, they also have a lot of single-only tracks that are worth a shot. "I Can Hear the Grass Grow", "Blackberry Way", "Tonight", "Chinatown", "California Man" and (the original) "Do Ya" are all top-tier stuff.




Can't argue with any of that Move related critique.



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