Jazz Club

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 30 May 2024, 16:42

Miles Davis - ESP

With Wayne Shorter on tenor saxophone, Herbie Hancock on piano, Ron Carter on bass, and Tony Williams on tubs



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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 31 May 2024, 18:10

Jazz Quiz:

Hank Mobley only appeared on one Miles Davis album.

Which one….?



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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby NMB » 04 Jun 2024, 23:16

C wrote:Jazz Quiz:

Hank Mobley only appeared on one Miles Davis album.

Which one….?

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I assume you mean only one studio album - Someday My Prince Will Come.

There are also some live albums recorded at The Blackhawk and at Carnegie Hall. And a couple of unused Prince tracks turned up later on Circle in the Round.

I never felt he was a very good fit though.
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mudshark
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 04 Jun 2024, 23:52

Is the right answer. I would have had to look it up, for as far as studio albums are concerned.
I only just saw this question. Immediately felt the urge to pull out and play the complete Blackhawk, because I KNOW Hank's blowing a mean horn on that one. Somebody nice sent me a copy of this treasure, soon after which I bought the original 4CD-box. All about 20 years ago. Don't know how much I paid, but it didn't come as cheap as it does now. I most certainly paid a lot more than the $42.33 it's nowadays going for on Amazon (just checked). I can't see what doesn't fit here, NMB; the rendition of So What is amazing, and the band overall is as tight as a Scottish wanker. Maybe you feel it's too unadventurous, and you could have a point there. Hank ain't no Trane. But this is straight forward 'easy' Jazz, and it don't get much better than what was played in April 1961 by Miles, Hank, the indomitable rhythm section of Paul Chambers & Jimmy Cobb, and Wynton Kelly on piano (who I don't know much about. I gotta check him out).
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby NMB » 05 Jun 2024, 12:19

mudshark wrote:Is the right answer. I would have had to look it up, for as far as studio albums are concerned.
I only just saw this question. Immediately felt the urge to pull out and play the complete Blackhawk, because I KNOW Hank's blowing a mean horn on that one. Somebody nice sent me a copy of this treasure, soon after which I bought the original 4CD-box. All about 20 years ago. Don't know how much I paid, but it didn't come as cheap as it does now. I most certainly paid a lot more than the $42.33 it's nowadays going for on Amazon (just checked). I can't see what doesn't fit here, NMB; the rendition of So What is amazing, and the band overall is as tight as a Scottish wanker. Maybe you feel it's too unadventurous, and you could have a point there. Hank ain't no Trane. But this is straight forward 'easy' Jazz, and it don't get much better than what was played in April 1961 by Miles, Hank, the indomitable rhythm section of Paul Chambers & Jimmy Cobb, and Wynton Kelly on piano (who I don't know much about. I gotta check him out).


I’m possibly being unfair but I find Mobley’s style a bit hard bop compared to the rest of the band, certainly I’m glad he was replaced by Wayne Shorter because things got a lot more interesting after that. I’ve got Someday my Prince and the Blackhawk set so I might have an intensive listen this afternoon and see if I change my mind.
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 05 Jun 2024, 14:05

I really rate Mobley- the "middleweight champion of the tenor saxophone", a metaphor used to describe his tone, that was neither as aggressive as John Coltrane nor as mellow as Lester Young, and his style that was laid-back, subtle and melodic, especially in contrast with players such as Coltrane and Sonny Rollins

I have many of the lad’s albums

Check out:

Peckin’ Time - with Lee Morgan
Soul Station
Roll Call
No Room for Squares
The Turnaround!



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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 09 Jun 2024, 03:09

Really REALLY enjoying "Reincarnations" by Mr. Mingus just now. The sticker says it's a "crucial companion to Incarnations". Makes sense. But I don't know/own that album. This one I'm listening is very good, despite the longish drum solo. Mingus & Dolphy. Is there a heaven? I like to think so.
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 09 Jun 2024, 14:41

mudshark wrote:The sticker says it's a "crucial companion to Incarnations". Makes sense. But I don't know/own that album.


Me neither

(Don’t forget JSL tonight @ 8pm[UK]

Amazon:

The music Charles Mingus and his group recorded during his landmark 1960 sessions for Candid Records produced three of the most revered jazz albums of the era - INCARNATIONS is a new masterpiece thoughtfully assembled from rare and unreleased material from those sessions that stands proudly in the Mingus canon of masterworks.

All but one of the tracks here are from the November 11th, 1960 sessions Mingus and producer Nate Hentoff put together. The date was split into two halves: one a pure Mingus-led date, featuring a six-piece band that expanded into an octet for two additional tunes, and another, a partial reunion of a collective that had assembled in opposition against George Wein's Newport Jazz Festival that past July. (That collective, calling themselves The Jazz Artist Guild, would release the album Newport Rebels, on Candid in 1961.)

Of special note here is the one track recorded during the Mingus October 20th 1960 sessions. It is a previously unreleased track titled "All The Things You Are (All.)" Found on a tape that contained material from both of these fall 1960 dates, the piece has its roots in an Art Tatum rendition of "All the Things You Are," which Mingus had recorded before in various settings.

Featuring Booker Ervin, Eric Dolphy, Charles McPherson, Ted Curson, Lonnie Hillyer, Roy Eldridge, Jimmy Knepper, Britt Woodman, Tommy Flanagan, Paul Bley, Dannie Richmond and Jo Jones. With audio restored and remastered by Bernie Grundman, and liner notes by Pitchfork and New York Times contributor Hank Shteamer, this album is a must have for any Mingus fan






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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 12 Jun 2024, 10:48

.
NP

Image

The lad Zap likes a drop of Wayne

{I see Cecil is still with us [89]}






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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 13 Jun 2024, 04:44

Everybody except me was out of the house this evening. We're with 7 humans now (3 generations, youngest 3 months) these days, so that doesn't happen very often. It gave grampa the rare opportunity to wind down a little with a bottle of rose wine and some Jazz. Even the dogs and cats recognized this currently quite unique occasion, and left me alone.

First up was the formidable Eric Dolphy with his quintet featuring Freddie Hubbard, with "Outward Bound". It's supposedly his first as a leader (that's what the liner notes say anyway) and it's got him on flute, alto-sax and bass-clarinet. Freddie was just a 22-year old whippersnapper when this was recorded in 1958, and I don't know the other guys in the band, but together they've produced a thing of beauty. The first composition (G.W.) is overpowering in its melancholy. "Glad to be Unhappy" has some fantastic interplay between Dolphy and Hubbard, while "245" is simply a classic. So classic that it's appears on side 1 as well as side 2. Dolphy was a genius multi-instrumentalist as we all know, and I like him on everything he blows but, judging from this album, it's mainly the flute what makes him stand out from everybody else, at least in these relatively early days of his all too short career. Best I ever heard, but my experiences with flute music don't go much further than Thijs van Leer and Ian Anderson.

Next Joe Henderson/Inner Sleeves. I think Jazzmaster C. has written more than enough on how great yet underrated this man is. If you're interested, just put on side B and be mesmerized by El Barrio and the Cole Porter evergreen Night & Day, played in quite a unique manner. I really like Jazz with Spanish/Latin influences (which is why I rate albums like Mingus' Tijuana Moods' so highly).

On these 17 Jazz Club pages I don't think there are any (definitely not many) negative reviews. Fortunately I've got one, somewhat: the highly acclaimed "Maiden Voyage" by Herbie Hancock. Some sort of concept album about the sea and what is/isn't in it, or something. I'm not a big fan of concept albums in any genre. The music of course needs to have lots of piano noodlings that are supposed to sound sea-ish, and Herbie indeed does a lot of that, in the similar vein as I was forced (and barely managed) to play way back when I was hoping to become the next Professor Longhair. With titles like "The Eye of the Hurricane" and "Dolphin Dance", I get the feeling I'm in the middle of a school play with kids in mermaid/man suits lifting cardboard waves up and down. The liner notes read like the prologue of Melville's Moby Dick which he threw away and started over again to get it right. BUT! This album gets saved by Freddie Hubbard (trumpet, of course) and George Coleman (tenor-sax), the man who put 'journey' into 'journeyman' (Miles, Chet, Lee, Max and many more, even John Patton!) who, at 89, is still doing the clubs. Their interplay, especially on the aforementioned Hurricane and on Survival of the Fittest, is fantastic. And with a rhythm section comprising of Ron Carter & Anthony Williams (a bit more about him in a bit) it's virtually impossible to go wrong. Yet Herbie, despite all the brilliance around him and in his piano fingers, still manages to produce a mediocre album, mainly due to overwrought compositions that, for some godforsaken reason need to be about the sea. But, as said, the album is highly, HIGHLY acclaimed, so not many will agree with my assessment. It's probably my allergy for concept albums. I blame Ian Anderson and Thijs van Leer.


I was looking around on the www a bit, trying to find out more about this album and its participants. I read that Tony Williams once was part of the so-called Trio Of Doom, together with Jaco P. and Lentil-soup Johnny Mac. I'm just gonna copy what Wiki says:

QUOTE
The Trio of Doom was a short-lived jazz fusion power trio consisting of John McLaughlin on guitar, Jaco Pastorius on bass, and Tony Williams on drums. They were brought together by Columbia Records in 1979 to play the Havana Jam festival in Cuba alongside Billy Joel, Kris Kristofferson, Rita Coolidge, and others.

They were named by Pastorius. He had earlier called his bass the "Bass of Doom," because of its growling sound.

Their only live performance was on March 3, 1979, and it is recorded on Ernesto Juan Castellanos's documentary Havana Jam '79.

On March 8, 1979, the group reconvened in New York City to record the songs they had played live, but a dispute broke out between Pastorius and Williams that ended the trio.

An album was released on June 26, 2007, on Legacy Recordings, containing five tracks from Havana Jam and five recorded in the studio.
UNQUOTE

Anybody here who heard/knows about this album?


Everybody's back home, so that's me confined to my office. I'm off to Europe June 27th. On my own. Bliss...
There's a big difference between kneeling down and bending over

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 13 Jun 2024, 09:38

Tremendous post Muddy - good lad, sounds like you had a robust evening!

Trio of Doom is a superb album- Yomptepi, who is now AWOL or is it MIA, and I used to rave about it regularly back in the day

They were brought together by Columbia Records in 1979 to play the Havana Jam festival in Cuba alongside Billy Joel, Kris Kristofferson, Rita Coolidge, and others

It’s very short and repeats a couple of tracks but is essential for a learned listener like you Erik

Unequivocally recommended





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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 13 Jun 2024, 21:29

Then I shall check it out. But not the vinyl release: now on Amazon, unused, for only $631.99. $95.00 (Mint condition) on Discogs.
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 14 Jun 2024, 09:38

mudshark wrote:Then I shall check it out. But not the vinyl release: now on Amazon, unused, for only $631.99. $95.00 (Mint condition) on Discogs.


The CD is £5.99 inc p&p on Amazon [UK] - brand new

A bargain!



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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 14 Jun 2024, 10:57

Muddy, I played it today and thoroughly enjoyed it

However, I love tubs and I adore Jaco’s playing

As I said there is repetition of tracks so perhaps have a listen to a couple of tracks on YouTube before purchase

Tracklist

"Drum Improvisation (live)" (Tony Williams) – 2:46
"Dark Prince (live)" (John McLaughlin) – 6:36
"Continuum (live)" (Jaco Pastorius) – 5:11
"Para Oriente (live)" (Tony Williams) – 5:42
"Are You the One? Are You the One? (live)" (John McLaughlin) – 4:51
"Dark Prince" (John McLaughlin) – 4:11
"Continuum" (Jaco Pastorius) – 3:49
"Para Oriente" (alternate take one) (Tony Williams) – 1:05
"Para Oriente" (alternate take two) (Tony Williams) – 0:20
"Para Oriente" (Tony Williams) – 5:28

Tracks 1–5 were recorded on 3 March 1979, at the Karl Marx Theatre, Havana, Cuba. Tracks 6–10 were recorded on 8 March 1979, at CBS Studios, New York




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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.

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Re: Jazz Club

Postby Hightea » 14 Jun 2024, 14:36

wow never heard about this album or performance.
Odd since I saw McLaughlin in 1979 and Paco in 81
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 14 Jun 2024, 18:18

Qobuz has got the doomed trio. I'll listen to in the car, later on today.
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 14 Jun 2024, 21:40

The drum improvs are a reconfirmation that Tony Williams was a very good drummer. That's it.
I was disappointed with Dark Prince. It's the like 'The Fast and the Furious, the instrumental version". And like those movies, it doesn't go anywhere for a long time. Then finally, after about 6 minutes of endless noodling, something that sounds like a structural composition pops up, but it inexplicably chimes in the end of the Dark Prince.
Continuum sounds as if I've known it for many years. It has a lot of similar bass lines as one of the tunes on Heavy Weather. Can't remember which one. But it makes it a very pleasant song, which begs for Joe and Wayne to come along and help the poor bastards out. Had they done so, it could have been a very good one.
The guys are warmed up now, and from this point onward they're playing some really good music. Para Oriente and - especially - Are you the one? are excellent Fusion performances.

We're obviously dealing with 3 virtuosos at the top of their game. But as band there's little or no cohesion. I bet a studio album with could have been 'seminal'. This live album is the aperitif for a luscious 3-course dinner that never has or will be served.
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby mudshark » 15 Jun 2024, 01:59

Way back when in my wilderness years I often spent my hard-earned money on albums the guy (always a guy) in the record store would recommend. One such album was Captain Fingers by Lee Ritenour. I liked it well enough. His "Isn't She Lovely" is better than Stevie's and the rest is just nice to listen to as well. Of course, us Jazz Club members aren't supposed to really like this kind of... what do we call it?: Light Jazz (??), but I still have a soft spot for it for sentimental reasons. I wouldn't defend it vehemently in a court of taste, though. No spot, soft or otherwise for the stuff he did afterwards with GRP productions, sometimes appearing with (forgive me) Kenny G. I didn't know (until I read it just know, of course), though, that he helped out David Gilmour with the difficult parts on Run Like Hell.

This is just a preamble to what this post is supposed to be about. In 1990 Ritenour went back to his roots and made an album called "Stolen Moments". I bought it (on CD of course) back when it came out (1989 or 1990), and played it often at the time, but I don't think I've listened to it in the 21st century. Until today. It's still a great album, very much in the tradition of the incredible West Montgomery, Lee's idol. Even better is Wes Bound, which goes back even more to the Montgomery roots. It includes some Montgomery covers and also, for no good reason at all and a real dissonant on an otherwise fine album, Bob's Waiting In Vain featuring Maxi Priest (no relation to Judas, apparently). It was probably done to boost sales (which it did). But especially the Montgomery covers are really good. I wonder if Lee played it without using a plectrum, just like West played his guitar.

And that got me to the only album by Wes himself that I own: Bags Meets Wes! The man himself with Milt Jackson. Wes is a self-taught picker who divided his time between being a machine welder and becoming a Jazz icon whose star could have risen to far greater heights had he not died at the tender age of 45. The man evidently couldn't make enough money becoming an icon. He had 7 kids. So do I. Of course I can't compare his struggles to mine, but I can relate to it being fairly hectic at the dinner table. What's there to say? 2 sides/38 minutes of the most relaxing smooth-jazz sounds you can imagine. Jingles, Stairway to the Stars (no relation to Jimmy Page) and S.K.J. stand out, but that doesn't mean the rest isn't wonderful as well.
Comes highly recommended! And his family will be grateful for your purchase.
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Re: Jazz Club

Postby C » 15 Jun 2024, 05:28

Nice post Erik

Regarding Trio of Doom, a few days after the Cuba festival the lads went into the studio. It didn’t really come to much mainly due to John and Tony finding Jaco ‘difficult’ to work with

It appears you weren’t that keen but even the snippets we had are, in my opinion, to treasure

I assume most know this but from Wiki:

On September 11, 1987, Jaco Pastorius snuck onstage at a Santana concert at the Sunrise Musical Theater in Sunrise, Florida. After being ejected from the premises, he made his way to the Midnight Bottle Club in Wilton Manors. After reportedly kicking in a glass door, having been refused entrance to the club, he became involved in a violent confrontation with Luc Havan, a club employee who was a martial arts expert. Pastorius was hospitalised for multiple facial fractures and injuries to his right eye and left arm, and fell into a coma. There were encouraging signs that he would come out of the coma and recover, but they soon faded. A brain hemorrhage a few days later led to brain death. He was taken off life support and died on September 21, 1987, at the age of 35, at Broward General Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale. His funeral was held at St. Clement's Catholic Church, Wilton Manors, Florida. Pastorius was buried at Queen of Heaven Cemetery in North Lauderdale, Broward County, Florida.

Havan faced a charge of second-degree murder. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to twenty-two months in prison and five years' probation. After serving four months in prison, he was paroled for good behaviour



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NMB wrote:I much prefer tuneless twaddle to tuneful twaddle.

Jazz generally does have a tune but they don’t necessarily play it to you.


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