Caravan

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Deebank
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Re: Caravan

Postby Deebank » 01 Sep 2021, 14:12

Neil Jung wrote:
Deebank wrote:
trans-chigley express wrote:Yes, another one I'd recommend to Deebank



Cheers, I will check them out...


On a side note, was it Pye Hastings who was electrocuted by a dodgy mic at a gig in South Wales or did I imagine that?


Wasn’t that Les Harvey of Stone The Crows?



Stone The Crows rings a bell. :?

And Mr Hastings is certainly still with us :)
I've been talking about writing a book - 25 years of TEFL - for a few years now. I've got it in me.

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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 01 Sep 2021, 15:15

Neil Jung wrote:
Deebank wrote:
trans-chigley express wrote:Yes, another one I'd recommend to Deebank



Cheers, I will check them out...


On a side note, was it Pye Hastings who was electrocuted by a dodgy mic at a gig in South Wales or did I imagine that?


Wasn’t that Les Harvey of Stone The Crows?


Indeed it was. Alex's brother.

Swansea Top Rank in 1972

[Pye is still with us]



.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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toomanyhatz
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Re: Caravan

Postby toomanyhatz » 01 Sep 2021, 22:28

Waterloo Lily sounds a lot like the first Hatfield and the North album. A certain amount of lightness is lost. It's still enjoyable to hear, but a bit fussier, and with less stoned groove and more long instrumental passages. I would expect C to like it a lot. :D

It keeps up admirably with the Yeses and King Crimsons of the world, but it's less Canterbury, so it's less my kind of thing.

Enough interesting stuff to keep me listening further, at least. But I miss the organ sound too.
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Neil Jung
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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 01 Sep 2021, 22:35

Realising I had a gap in my early Caravan collection I bought the CD of Waterloo Lily a few years ago. I found that I already had the decent tracks on various compilations and live albums and the rest was frankly not to my taste. I sold it soon after.
[indistinct chatter]

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Re: Caravan

Postby trans-chigley express » 02 Sep 2021, 01:10

I don't have a copy of Waterloo Lily, I chose not to replace my vinyl copy as I wasn't keen on it, but I'd like to revisit it. I may like it more now as the jazz element may well appeal more these days

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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 02 Sep 2021, 16:05

[quote="toomanyhatz"]Waterloo Lily [...] I would expect C to like it a lot. :D

quote]

He certainly does.

I admit when it first came out it wasn't quite what I expected. As for your Hatfield's reference Sinclair and the two Miller lads went on after Waterloo Lily to form the said band.

As you say Dave, it had a different feel and how can anybody follow Grey & Pink....?

However, it needs a bit of perseverance for the penny to drop.

The Love In Your Eye 'suite' on side 2 even has Miles Davis undertones in there

I like a bit of jazz me so this album is just up my street

Give it time Goons - it's worth the investment of time





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LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 02 Sep 2021, 16:07

Neil Jung wrote:R I sold it soon after.


:o

Never mind.

As Zappa said: you either get it or you don't

I guess you didn't. No harm done

Nay, no harm done Mike




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LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 03 Sep 2021, 17:27

Image
For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night 1973
Some say the last of the great run of Caravan LPs which their legacy is based on, this features the return of David Sinclair, who was missed on Waterloo Lily. I don't think enough is written about him. Never mentioned alongside Wakeman, Emerson, Jobson, Moraz, or even Banks - and maybe he's not on their level, but he has an instantly identifiable sound - and it's certainly pleasing to these ears. His work on "Nine Feet Underground" alone ensures his place in prog Valhalla, and it's good that he's back on board for this record. More popular than the last album, this is one of the great progressive rock records of that year.

Pye Hastings – electric and acoustic guitars, lead vocals
Geoff Richardson – viola
David Sinclair – Hammond organ, piano, electric piano, Davoli synthesizer, ARP synthesizer on (1 b)
John G. Perry – bass, vocals, percussion
Richard Coughlan – drums, percussion, timpani

Additional personnel
Rupert Hine – ARP synthesizer (1a,b & 6)
Frank Ricotti – congas ( 1 b, 2, 4, 7)
Jimmy Hastings – flute (1)
Pete King – flute, alto saxophone (1)
Harry Klein – clarinet, baritone saxophone (1)
Tony Coe – clarinet, tenor saxophone (1)
Henry Lowther – trumpet (1)
Chris Pyne – trombone (1)
Barry Robinson – piccolo (1)
Tom Whittle – clarinet, tenor saxophone (1)
Jill Pryor – voice (4)
Paul Buckmaster – electric cello (7)
Orchestra arranged by John Bell and Martyn Ford, conducted by Martyn Ford

All songs composed by Pye Hastings, except where noted.

1. "Memory Lain, Hugh"
"Headloss" 9:19
A noticeably rockier approach is immediately apparent; you can even hear a guitar, which is unusual for this lot. Pye is taking control of the songwriting on this album and the tunes have more of a structure than those on the previous LP. Dave has a solo around the 2:30 part and everything is as it should be. Another multi-titled, lengthy prog number from one of the progenitors of the form. Brother Jimmy on flute again. I'm tellin' ya - he should have been permanent. Before the five-minute mark the "Headloss" section comes in loud and strong sounding like a completely different song because it is.

2. "Hoedown" 3:20
Not the Aaron Copland number that ELP did, this is another one of Pye's radio tunes probably designed for commercial purposes. Guitar-driven with a forward momentum. It's okay but it doesn't sound like the Caravan of old. It's over before it becomes irksome.

3. "Surprise, Surprise" 4:07
A ballad seemed to be in order for the sequencing and the song starts out that way, but before it can become established the tempo picks up and we have another enjoyable pop song from Hastings.

4. "C'thlu Thlu" 6:15
How many rock songs have used H.P. Lovecraft's monster for inspiration? This is a pretty good 'un combining a cool riff, pop nous, and the usual Canterbury laid back vibe but with stop-on-a-dime playing. Who is that on vocals with Pye - new guy John G. Perry? Can't tell. Another Sinclair solo though, so you know I'm in.

Image Image

5. "The Dog, The Dog, He's at It Again" 5:58
Another nice Hastings tune - whimsical lyrics about a flasher with a singalong quality, acceptable length combined with a cool Sinclair part, topped off with fine musicianship. It couldn't be any other band, really.

6. "Be All Right"
"Chance of a Lifetime" 6:37
Like this one too. A focus on riffs seems to be in order in Pye's writing for this platter. And we actually have a guitar solo here, somewhat buried in the mix, but it's there nonetheless. At around 2:35 the "Chance in a Lifetime" part is underway, and it seems to be music that could be on In the Land of Grey and Pink. Yep, it's that good, people. Is that a viola solo? This cut is a highlight for sure.

7. "L'Auberge du Sanglier"
"A Hunting We Shall Go"
"Pengola"
"Backwards"
"A Hunting We Shall Go (reprise)" (Pye Hastings, John G. Perry, Mike Ratledge) 10:07
"Be All Right" segues right into this last track, and it's another high point on an album filled with them. If anything, side two is even better than side one. This final cut is classic Caravan - progressive as all getout. Riff-laden, with different sections - all adding to the whole. There are dynamics as the piece slows down for an orchestral passage overladen by Sinclair's synths. Epic! Close your eyes and see where this takes you.

Image

Image
Caravan & The New Symphonia 1974
Almost a companion piece to For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night, really. The band enjoyed how they "fused" with the orchestra on the last number on that LP, and recorded a live album at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in London with the New Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Martyn Ford and mixed on February 7th at AIR Studios. It's good and a live LP was overdue. The original record has been expanded on the CD rendering the first version negligible. I'll review the CD rather than the initial album as it is by far the definitive version.

Caravan
Pye Hastings – guitar, vocals
Geoff Richardson – electric viola
Dave Sinclair – electric piano, organ, synthesizer
John G. Perry – bass guitar, vocals
Richard Coughlan – drums

Backing vocals
Liza Strike
Vicki Brown
Margot Newman
Helen Chappelle
Tony Burrows
Robert Lindop
Danny Street

The New Symphonia
Martyn Ford (conductor), Richard Studt (leader), Irvine Arditti, Paul Beer, Ted Chance, Andrew Cauthery, Roger Chase, Lynden Cranham, Michael Crowther, Robin Davies, Rita Eddowes, Liz Edwards, Wilfred Gibson, Lucy Finch, Jo Frohlich, Wilf Gibson, Roy Gillard, Michael Harris, Tony Harris, Jimmy Hastings, Terry Johns, Skaila Kanda, Skaila Kanga, Garry Kettell, Chris Laurence, Helen Liebmann, Stephen May, Donald McVay, Dee Partridge, Geoff Perkins, Morris Pert, Mike Perton, Martin Robinson, Godfrey Salmon, Jan Schlapp, Colin Walker, Cathy Weiss, Robin Williams, Dave Woodcock, Nick Worters, Gavyn Wright.

1. "Introduction by Alan Black"/"Memory Lain, Hugh / Headloss" (Pye Hastings) 9:57
Great version of this song and a nice introduction to the music performed that night. The CD has the tunes in the sequential order that they were performed. The opening trio of Plump cuts were not on the album.

2. "The Dog, The Dog, He's at it Again" (Pye Hastings) 6:35
Pye has a lengthy introduction where he talks about a flasher who can't control his urges being the subject of this tune. Nice, but not necessarily better than the studio version. Good Dave solo though - I always notice that.

3. "Hoedown" (Pye Hastings) 3:55
Again, very similar to the version on Plump, if perhaps a bit faster as live renditions tend to be.

4. "Introduction" by Simon Jeffes /"The Love in Your Eye" (Richard Coughlan, Pye Hastings, Richard Sinclair) 12:23
The orchestra is here for this lengthy number. Lots of progressive bands tended to want to meld their music with orchestral backing. Ever heard a Barclay James Harvest album? The band comes in before the three-minute mark, and then play with the orchestra intermittently for the duration of the song. Actually, it's two songs as Pye announces "The Love in Your Eye" at around the seven-minute point. It may even be better than the version on Waterloo Lily. For some reason it's banded together as one track here. Nice viola solo by Richardson. This was the closing cut on side one of the album.

5. "Mirror for the Day" (Pye Hastings) 4:45
This was a new number written especially for the occasion and originally appeared as the second track on the LP. Nice integration with the orchestra, and surprisingly pop-oriented, even for Hastings.

6. "Virgin on the Ridiculous" (Pye Hastings) 7:55
And another one appearing for the first time opened the second side of the 1974 record. Pye is striving for sales with songs like these, you can tell. So many prog bands would do the same thing before the close of the decade but they wouldn't do it live with an orchestra. Give these guys credit for that at least. The Sinclair solo elevates this number.

7. "For Richard" (Richard Coughlan, Pye Hastings, Dave Sinclair, Richard Sinclair) 15:00
Great version of this If I Could Do It All Over Again... song which closed the live LP and could be the high point, actually. The strings add a certain melancholy absent on the studio version. This is their 'big number' of the evening and they pull it off splendidly.

8. "A Hunting We Shall Go" (Pye Hastings, John G. Perry, Mike Ratledge) 10:33
The encore is a piece of the last cut on the Plump album done very nicely here and is another selling-point for this CD as it wasn't on the original LP. Pye cranking out a guitar solo before the third minute is not something you hear everyday in a Caravan song. One of the best things on the disc.

Image
Last edited by Matt Wilson on 03 Sep 2021, 20:23, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 03 Sep 2021, 20:23

Matt Wilson wrote:Image
For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night 1973
Some say the last of the great run of Caravan LPs which their legacy is based on, this features the return of David Sinclair, who was missed on Waterloo Lily. I don't think enough is written about him. Never mentioned alongside Wakeman, Emerson, Jobson, Moraz, or even Banks - and maybe he's not on their level, but he has an instantly identifiable sound - and it's certainly pleasing to these ears. His work on "Nine Feet Underground" alone ensures his place in prog Valhalla, and it's good that he's back on board for this record. More popular than the last album, this is one of the great progressive rock records of that year.

Pye Hastings – electric and acoustic guitars, lead vocals
Geoff Richardson – viola
David Sinclair – Hammond organ, piano, electric piano, Davoli synthesizer, ARP synthesizer on (1 b)
John G. Perry – bass, vocals, percussion
Richard Coughlan – drums, percussion, timpani

Additional personnel
Rupert Hine – ARP synthesizer (1a,b & 6)
Frank Ricotti – congas ( 1 b, 2, 4, 7)
Jimmy Hastings – flute (1)
Pete King – flute, alto saxophone (1)
Harry Klein – clarinet, baritone saxophone (1)
Tony Coe – clarinet, tenor saxophone (1)
Henry Lowther – trumpet (1)
Chris Pyne – trombone (1)
Barry Robinson – piccolo (1)
Tom Whittle – clarinet, tenor saxophone (1)
Jill Pryor – voice (4)
Paul Buckmaster – electric cello (7)
Orchestra arranged by John Bell and Martyn Ford, conducted by Martyn Ford

All songs composed by Pye Hastings, except where noted.

1. "Memory Lain, Hugh"
"Headloss" 9:19
A noticeably rockier approach is immediately apparent; you can even hear a guitar, which is unusual for this lot. Pye is taking control of the songwriting on this album and the tunes have more of a structure than those on the previous LP. Dave has a solo around the 2:30 part and everything is as it should be. Another multi-titled, lengthy prog number from one of the progenitors of the form. Brother Jimmy on flute again. I'm tellin' ya - he should have been permanent. Before the five-minute mark the "Headloss" section comes in loud and strong sounding like a completely different song because it is.

2. "Hoedown" 3:20
Not the Aaron Copland number that ELP did, this is another one of Pye's radio tunes probably designed for commercial purposes. Guitar-driven with a forward momentum. It's okay but it doesn't sound like the Caravan of old. It's over before it becomes irksome.

3. "Surprise, Surprise" 4:07
A ballad seemed to be in order for the sequencing and the song starts out that way, but before it can become established the tempo picks up and we have another enjoyable pop song from Hastings.

4. "C'thlu Thlu" 6:15
How many rock songs have used H.P. Lovecraft's monster for inspiration? This is a pretty good 'un combining a cool riff, pop nous, and the usual Canterbury laid back vibe but with stop-on-a-dime playing. Who is that on vocals with Pye - new guy John G. Perry? Can't tell. Another Sinclair solo though, so you know I'm in.

Image Image

5. "The Dog, The Dog, He's at It Again" 5:58
Another nice Hastings tune - whimsical lyrics about a flasher with a singalong quality, acceptable length combined with a cool Sinclair part, topped off with fine musicianship. It couldn't be any other band, really.

6. "Be All Right"
"Chance of a Lifetime" 6:37
Like this one too. A focus on riffs seems to be in order in Pye's writing for this platter. And we actually have a guitar solo here, somewhat buried in the mix, but it's there nonetheless. At around 2:35 the "Chance in a Lifetime" part is underway, and it seems to be music that could be on In the Land of Grey and Pink. Yep, it's that good, people. Is that a viola solo? This cut is a highlight for sure.

7. "L'Auberge du Sanglier"
"A Hunting We Shall Go"
"Pengola"
"Backwards"
"A Hunting We Shall Go (reprise)" (Pye Hastings, John G. Perry, Mike Ratledge) 10:07
"Be All Right" segues right into this last track, and it's another high point on an album filled with them. If anything, side two is even better than side one. This final cut is classic Caravan - progressive as all getout. Riff-laden, with different sections - all adding to the whole. There are dynamics as the piece slows down for an orchestral passage overladen by Sinclair's synths. Epic! Close your eyes and see where this takes you.

Image


I love this album - their third best.

Probably



.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 03 Sep 2021, 21:29

I didn’t know The Dog The Dog etc was about a flasher, but I do find the lyrics to be in very questionable taste.
Apart from that track I do very much like the album and also New Symphonia. I didn’t know there was a reissue with more tracks. May have to have a look for it.
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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 03 Sep 2021, 22:06

Image
Cunning Stunts 1975
Many fans decided to jump ship after this one and indeed, Dave Sinclair departed once again before the LP's release as well. Even though the group were now playing in the States opening up for other bands, the money simply wasn't rolling in by the middle of the decade, and this is always cause for concern for musicians with families and bills to be paid. A great Hipgnosis LP cover and another one of their juvenile sexual puns for the title tells us it's Caravan. If I had to pick an album so far to describe with the overused tag of "underrated," this would be it.

Pye Hastings – electric guitar and acoustic guitars, vocals
Dave Sinclair – keyboards, string co-arrangement on "No Backstage Pass", brass co-arrangement on "Ben Karratt Rides Again" and "Sneaking out the Bare Quare"
Geoffery Richardson – viola, electric guitar, Western concert flute, flute, night-shift whistle
Mike Wedgwood – bass guitar, congas, vocals, Moog brass on "Stuck in a Hole", string arrangement on "Lover" and "No Backstage Pass"
Richard Coughlan – drums

Additional personnel
Jimmy Hastings – brass arrangement on "Ben Karratt Rides Again" and "Sneaking out the Bare Quare"

1. "The Show of Our Lives" (John Murphy, Dave Sinclair) 5:47
Dave gets a rare writing credit here with his friend, John Murphy. He always wanted more of his music represented on Caravan recordings and here he gets his chance. Lovely number with Pye getting a guitar solo (unless that's Geoffrey Richardson) which runs almost the duration of the track.

2. "Stuck in a Hole" (Pye Hastings) 3:09
This sounds much more like a conventional rock song than what we're used to - but I like it. As I keep mentioning, commercial interests were always of paramount concern to Hastings and it's too bad none of his concessions in that direction paid off financially. But then - this LP was the first one to chart on either side of the Atlantic, so there's that.

3. "Lover" (Mike Wedgwood) 5:06
"Who's Mike Wedgwood?" I hear you asking. Well, he's the new bass player and such was the state of the band at the time that he gets a song and if that's him on vocals, then he gets to sing one too. Fine, but it doesn't sound like Caravan. Wedgwood even got to arrange the strings.

4. "No Backstage Pass" (Pye Hastings) 4:34
Said strings flow right into this cut, which, with Pye's vocals sounds much more like what we're used to. Nice and dreamy.

5. "Welcome the Day" (Mike Wedgwood) 4:01
The new guys gets no less than two writing credits of the first side of this record, and this one doesn't sound anymore like Caravan than the last one. Funkier than normal, with layered vocals in the chorus. You can tell Mike shared Pye's desire for commerciallity. It's not bad, just a tad faceless. Like to know who's playing guitar on these tracks, Hastings or Richardson. Bet it's Pye. David has a solo here which doesn't even sound like him.

ImageImage

6. "The Dabsong Conshirtoe" a. "The Mad Dabsong" b. "Ben Karratt Rides Again" c. "Pro's and Con's" d. "Wraiks and Ladders" e. "Sneaking out the Bare Quare" f. "All Sorts of Unmentionable Things" (John Murphy, Dave Sinclair) 18:00
There hadn't been a song with this length since the In the Land of the Grey and Pink album, so one can't say the band weren't giving Sinclair his chance on the Cunning Stunts record. I like it - and like all Caravan albums so far, play it enough and it'll grow on you. But I'd be lying if I said it was anywhere near as good as "Nine Feet Underground." Having written that, the multiple parts work, and its progginess is certainly present. Everyone gets their due, instrumental-wise, the keys, viola, bass, flute (why isn't brother Jimmy playing?), etc. Probably the most traditionally progressive-sounding cut to be found here, and the more it plays, the more I like it, though it does go on a few minutes too long. Wonder how this would have sounded live?

7. "Fear and Loathing in Tollington Park Rag" (Geoffrey Richardson) 1:10
Last little ditty almost reminds me of the Airplane's "Third Week in the Chelsea."

Image

I'm not gonna review it because it wasn't released at the time, but this is another great live release from this era:

Image
Live at the Fairfield Halls, 1974
Superb recording (it actually sounds better than the live album I just reviewed) of the band sans strings from right before they began to play in America. They do pretty much the entire Plump record and even "Virgin on the Ridiculous" which was written to be performed with an orchestra - although it sounds great here. Probably my fave live Caravan and it should've been released then.

All Music - "Documented during an era in which U.K. performances by Caravan were few and far between, Live at the Fairfield Halls 1974 is a brilliantly remastered and likewise complete presentation of a concert held just prior to their inaugural tour of North America. Although Caravan had been subjected to several key personnel and managerial alterations in the preceding months, once they hit the stage they shed any behind-the-scenes acrimony and were transformed into a stunning synergy of progressive and symphonic rock. This warm-up show took place on September 1, 1974, at Fairfield Hall in Croydon and was initially documented as a possible promotional tool for their upcoming stateside appearances. The tapes remained on deposit, seemingly forgotten, at the Decca studios storage facility in West Hampstead, U.K., until the stunning 19-minute "For Richard" was resurrected for inclusion on the two-LP Canterbury Tales compilation in 1976. Then, in 1980, the French budget label Kingdom Records issued a double album under the title The Best of Caravan Live. All but the most keen-eyed and -eared enthusiasts passed the set up as a poorly assembled hits package. It was, however, this show sans "Chance of a Lifetime" -- which the band rarely ever performed. Then as mysteriously as it appeared it was deleted and remains out of print. On this release, the sound has been sonically scrubbed and is now presented faithful to the original presentation. Enthusiasts who prefer the band's lineup and subsequent edgier tone, circa For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night, will be doubly thrilled with this release as they re-create most of the album. Additionally, they wrap themselves around the crushing "Memory Lain, Hugh"/"Headloss" opener. Perhaps foreshadowing how powerful this rendition will be, the evening's proceedings fade in to the hovering resonation of Geoffrey Richardson's electric viola as he fiddles underneath the band's introduction. Caravan's most recent release concurrent to this performance is the equally impressive Caravan & the New Symphonia. From that disc comes "Virgin on the Ridiculous" -- performed here by just the quintet. Although composed for the incorporation of an orchestra, this rendition is leaner and displays the band's almost conversational way of jamming and improvising. The transition into the "Be Alright Now" suite is seamless, and, under the thunder sticks of Richard Coughlan (drums), the band is propelled into one of the only live versions of the medley to have been professionally documented. With a well-deserved nod to the "New Symphonia," Live at the Fairfield Halls 1974 will perhaps become the quintessential live Caravan release. The sound is crisp and the stereo image is direct and very warm. This disc is highly recommended for newly found fans as well as the more seasoned consumer."

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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 04 Sep 2021, 12:11

Ah yes Cunning Stunts. How juvenile. Mike Wedgwood had been bass player with Curved Air on Air Cut (which I think is their best album). Of course he didn’t sing with them as they had Sonia Christina. I really like Show Of Our Lives, which Mike sings. The rest of side 1 is poor. Side 2 they’re just trying too hard and failing.
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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 04 Sep 2021, 14:22

[indistinct chatter]

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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 04 Sep 2021, 15:52

Thanks for that, Neil. I watched the video. I guess that's Richard Sinclair singing "Golf Girl." Didn't really know what he looked like. I also didn't realize he was Dave's cousin until I starting reading the book in the box set, thought they were brothers.

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Re: Caravan

Postby Lord Rother » 04 Sep 2021, 19:17

trans-chigley express wrote:
I also have a compilation called Canterbury Tales which is actually a very fine comp....


That was the 1st album I heard of them.

I was in some music club (Britannia I think) back in the late 70s where you could choose or were sent 3 random cassettes every month - Canterbury Tales was a random - loved it, pretty much wore it out over the years.

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Re: Caravan

Postby toomanyhatz » 05 Sep 2021, 07:18

The live one is a bit much at times. I can't think of a rock/orchestra collaboration that works really well. Procol's live one is probably about the closest, but it's usually either too many crescendos or a step above muzak. I like Plump and Cunning a lot, though - probably the two best outside of the first three. (Wedgewood's songs are dull, but I like the rest.)

Pye Hastings is a pretty interesting character. Canterbury sure produced some quirky songwriters.
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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 05 Sep 2021, 16:17

Here's a review of the box set that I've been playing while writing about these albums.

https://www.allaboutjazz.com/who-do-you ... fish-music

Also, Prog Archive's ever-changing list of the 100 best Prog albums of all-time.

http://www.progarchives.com/top-prog-al ... bumtypes=1

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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 05 Sep 2021, 22:38

I’ve just read that review. It took me ages, it must have been a real labour of love to write it. Caravan are actually playing only about 25 minutes drive from me in Basingstoke later this year. Should I go see them again?

PS Dave Sinclair’s Moon Over Man album was, I’m sorry to say, awful.
[indistinct chatter]

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mudshark
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Re: Caravan

Postby mudshark » 05 Sep 2021, 23:37

I saw Kind Of Blue and Hot Rats on that list. I stopped scrolling.
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Matt Wilson
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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 06 Sep 2021, 00:03

mudshark wrote:I saw Kind Of Blue and Hot Rats on that list. I stopped scrolling.


I noticed three Zappas and at least two Miles albums. I guess it's as Stephen says, a broad church.
Last edited by Matt Wilson on 09 Sep 2021, 05:35, edited 1 time in total.