Caravan

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Matt Wilson
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Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 31 Aug 2021, 14:21

If The Soft Machine is my favorite Canterbury band, Caravan is probably number two. Not sure how much love there is for them here as a couple times when I've mentioned the group there were some negative comments. But that's okay, I've recently purchased the massive Who Do You Think We Are? box set, so I'll commence to reviewing their initial '70s catalog. It's not very big anyway.

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Caravan 1968
I have a certain fondness for this album. While no masterpiece, it does have a definite charm and I seem to appreciate it much more than I used to. The band weren't happy with the production claiming there was too much reverb and echo applied without their knowledge, but it sounds fine to me. Released in both mono and stereo, I don't have a clear preference as to which one I like better. I can picture myself back there in the late ‘60s grooving to an LP like this – especially as it didn’t seem to make any waves. Kind of like being hip to something no one else was - but better things were right around the corner for the band. Superior to the first albums from Genesis and Yes for sure. It has that ability to grow on you if you play it a couple times in a row. Try it.


Pye Hastings – lead vocals, co-lead vocals, guitars, bass guitar
Richard Sinclair – lead vocals, co-lead vocals, bass guitar, guitar
Dave Sinclair – organ, piano
Richard Coughlan – drums

Additional personnel
Jimmy Hastings – flute on "Love Song with Flute"

All tracks credited to Dave Sinclair, Pye Hastings, Richard Coughlan & Richard Sinclair except where noted.

1. "Place of my Own" 4:00
My fave Caravan song really. Perfect blend of a bit of psych with the upcoming progressive rock elements. This is where I first fell in love with Pye Hastings' vocals and Dave Sinclair's organ sound. The first song Hastings ever wrote.

2. "Ride" 3:41
Starts off sounding like a mid-tempo tune and then becomes something else before the two-minute mark. It goes back and forth between both extremes for its duration. A steady drum beat grounds Pie's voice and the instrumental parts are very psychedelic. These first two tracks were the A & B sides of their first 45.

3. "Policeman" 2:45
Very echoey production on this one. Mid-tempo number which I quite like actually - though I couldn't tell you why. A certain naff charm and innocence, I guess.

4. "Love Song with Flute" 4:09
Another highlight of the LP. Starts off slowly and becomes a bossa nova tune around 1:40. Beautiful, with a great flute solo from Pye's brother, Jimmy, a musician with the BBC Radio Orchesta.

5. "Cecil Rons" 4:05
Discordant sounds become a throbbing bass line until the harmonized vocals come in and we're in for a different kind of Caravan song here. An interesting chorus doesn't really save this cut. A certain Floydian ambiance permeates the proceedings methinks.

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6. "Magic Man" 4:01
Maybe I'm imagining things but there's another slight Floyd feel to this one - like a Rick Wright number maybe. It's okay, but not one of my faves.

7. "Grandma's Lawn" 3:23
This one moves along nicely, with a different sound because of Richard Sinclair's vocals. The liner notes in the new box describe this as sounding like the Doors, but I don't hear it.

8. "Where but for Caravan Would I?" (Dave Sinclair, Pye Hastings, Richard Coughlan, Richard Sinclair, Brian L. Hopper) 9:01
Their big proggy number which changes throughout the song and is more indicative of what they would sound like later. Dave is all over the place with his keys, but he's not quite the player he would be on subsequent albums. Nevertheless, I like the instrumental passages more than the parts with vocals. I seem to feel that way about most prog now that I think about it.

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If I Could Do It All Over Again I'd Do It All Over You 1970
A quantum leap forward for our Cantabrians, and an underrated prog album from the dawn of the decade. I love pretty much everything here and the LP forms a perfect bridge to next year's magnum opus, In the Land of Grey and Pink. A BCBer whose name escapes me sent me both this and the first album on CDR ages ago and that's what I've been playing all these years until I got the box. A damn-near perfect collection of whimsical cuts and proggy absurdity all doused in catchy tuneage with funny song titles designed for maximum consumption. Pick up a copy of this 'un and indulge while we're of stable health and sound minds. Progressive rock isn't all about Genesis, Yes, Pink Floyd, Jethro Tull, King Crimson, and ELP. There's a whole slew of great second-tier bands awaiting your discovery. Make Caravan your next musical delicacy!

Pye Hastings – vocals, 6- and 12-string electric guitars, 6 string acoustic guitar, claves, percussion {worn leather strap, [[ashtrays}]], voice {impersonation of a friendly gorilla}
Richard Sinclair – vocals, bass guitar, tambourine, hedge clippers
David Sinclair – Hammond organ, piano, harpsichord
Richard Coughlan – drums, congas, bongos, maracas, finger cymbals

Additional personnel
Jimmy Hastings – saxophone, flute

All songs by Richard Coughlan, Pye Hastings, Richard Sinclair and Dave Sinclair.

1. "If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You" 3:07
It begins with a sturdy rhythm which becomes an ear worm before the short track is over. The production is better than the last record and the chanting lyrics are from the band’s road manager, Mark, “who came up with the phrase. He just came out with it one day, and Bingo, here was the perfect album title. It should be said that “All over you” actually means “All because of you.” – Pye Hastings.


2. "And I Wish I Were Stoned"
"Don't Worry" 8:20
That gorgeous organ by Dave combined with the understated vocals are Caravan hallmarks. He wishes he were stoned, folks. Is it any wonder I'm a fan? Love the solo after the two-minute mark, and a cool guitar part before the five-minute mark. Lots of percussion towards the end of the cut ends it.

3. "As I Feel I Die" 5:06
Wispy, ethereal track and another Floydian feel (Waters, this time). But it picks up considerably before two minutes and like so many progressive rock songs, becomes something else entirely. The Byrds had a somewhat similar feel to their "Tribal Gathering" number on the Notorious album, but this is played faster. They're showing their chops here, folks.

4. "With an Ear to the Ground You Can Make It"
"Martinian"
"Only Cox"
"Reprise" 9:54
The big tune on side one gets the longest length and no less than four titles. At about one minute in we're listening to Pye singing about an invitation to ride with him waiting for the band to come. By two minutes it sounds like another song (because it probably is, remember the titles?), and by the third minute we're listening to another moody organ solo. These moments might be my favorite Caravan experiences. I instantly begin daydreaming about bygone days when Sinclair is at the keyboard - and this is probably his best passage so far. By about 4:30 Jimmy Hastings is on flute again. Did they ever play this stuff on the radio, even in England? I'd like to think they did - but I sure as shit never heard it. The piano section at the end does go on a bit long though.

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5. "Hello Hello" 3:45
Released as an edited 45 before the end of the year, and we're almost back in the Byrds' "Tribal Gathering" tempo. The organ solo replicates the vocal melody. Interesting enough to warrant discussion and pretty good for condensed Caravan. They don't know how to end these songs sometimes.

6. "Asforteri 25" 1:21
Kind of like "Wild Honey Pie" by the fabs - it's over before you know it, and serves as a link to the next cut.

7. "Can't Be Long Now"
"Françoise"
"For Richard"
"Warlock" 14:21
Their big progressive tune of the LP starts of like "As I Feel I Die," which is to say so nebulous you can almost see through it. When that bass comes in before the three-minute mark, you know we're going in a different direction. I enjoy the flute on these recordings too. By 3:39 we're rockin'. Dave is taking off again and it's superb like the last cut on side one. Jimmy on sax for his turn! Oh my, by 6:00 it's Dave again. I could listen to this stuff for minutes at a time. Almost like Traffic now, but not as commercial. The combination of organ, flute, and saxophone - each taking turns, is unique to be sure. This druggy ambience is typical for Canterbury bands, at least the ones I know of. They hammer a riff for a couple minutes before the obligatory sloppy close.

8. "Limits" 1:35
We're back into a bossa nova beat like on the first LP for this little ending ditty. Twas all a most enjoyable experience...

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In The Land of Grey and Pink 1971
Far and away their best album. It all comes together here. The whimsy, Dave Sinclair's genius, the emergence of Richard Sinclair as a major songwriter, etc. Love it all and not a wasted moment. If anything, this album is underrated. One of the progressive monoliths of the early '70s and one I'd recommend to anyone remotely interested in the genre.

"The album was critically well received but was not a chart success, which led to frustration within the band and David Sinclair's departure. Nevertheless, it has remained in print and sold steadily, and been recommended by critics as a good introduction to the Canterbury Scene genre. The band look back favourably on the album and several of its tracks have remained fixtures in Caravan's live repertoire." - Wikipedia

Richard Sinclair – bass guitar, acoustic guitar, vocals
Pye Hastings – electric guitars, acoustic guitar, vocals
Dave Sinclair – Hammond organ, piano, Mellotron, harmony vocals
Richard Coughlan – drums and percussion

Additional personnel
Jimmy Hastings – flute, tenor sax, piccolo
Dave Grinsted – cannon, bell and wind
John Beecham – trombone on "Golf Girl"

All songs by Richard Coughlan, Pye Hastings, Dave Sinclair and Richard Sinclair (except "Aristocracy", by Coughlan, Hastings and Richard Sinclair).

1. "Golf Girl" (lead vocal - Richard Sinclair) 5:05
Perfect little pop song to start us off. Not necessarily indicative of where these guys usually are with their music, but one of my faves nonetheless. I want me a golf girl! "Most of the album aside from "Nine Feet Underground" was recorded in December at Air Studios in Oxford Street. "Glow Girl" had been tried at Decca Studios but was re-recorded with different lyrics as "Golf Girl", which featured flute and trombone parts." - Wikipedia

2. "Winter Wine" (lead vocal - Richard Sinclair) 7:46
Another great Richard Sinclair tune; where did his song-writing ability come from? "Winter Wine" had been recorded in September as a rough instrumental with wordless vocals, but was given a second attempt at Air Studios, by which time it had acquired lyrics about dreams and fairy tales. The final version features a folk influenced acoustic guitar introduction and included an improvised organ section in the middle. The last track to be recorded was the title track, which featured the sound of Richard Sinclair blowing bubbles. The album was mixed at Decca in January 1971." - Wiki again.

The first of the really cool Dave organ solos is here.

3. "Love to Love You (And Tonight Pigs Will Fly)" (lead vocal - Pye Hastings) 3:06
Pye's voice reminds one of previous albums, but as good as this song is - it's certainly no better than the two previous Richard Sinclair joints. A proper little pop ditty tailor-made for the radio, but unfortunately, radio was having none of it.

Wikipedia: "Recording began in September 1970 at Decca Studios, West Hampstead, London. Guitarist Pye Hastings had written the bulk of material for earlier albums, which led to a backlog of songs composed by the rest of the group; consequently he only offered a single song, "Love to Love You (And Pigs Might Fly)". Though Caravan had yet to achieve strong commercial success in 1970, they had started to build a live following, including an appearance at the Kralingen Pop Festival in the Netherlands to an audience of 250,000 and the 10th Plumpton Festival. In between touring, the group had written several new pieces that they wanted to record. Having had problems self-producing the previous album, If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You, the group decided to collaborate with producer David Hitchcock. Hitchcock had become a fan of the band and had been a key figure in getting them signed to Decca Records. He had progressed from the label's art department to production and was keen to work on the album. The group had been apprehensive about Hitchcock working on If I Could Do It All Over Again... but after discovering his enthusiasm and creative ideas, decided it would be a good idea to enroll him as producer."

4. "In the Land of Grey and Pink" (lead vocal - Richard Sinclair) 4:51
Another Richard gem. I'm blasting the Steven Wilson 5.1 mix now. Can't believe some of you guys don't dig Caravan. How could this be any better? To these ears, no Kevin Ayers album is as good as this. But then I'm a fanboy, so pay me no mind. Ooo, here comes another Dave organ solo to warm me up for side two.

Wiki: "The album was released on 8 April 1971 and featured a Tolkien influenced cover, drawn by Anne Marie Anderson. It did not chart in the UK, but sold steadily throughout the 1970s, remaining in print, with "Nine Feet Underground" becoming a popular track on late-night FM radio. The group became frustrated with their lack of commercial success, which they blamed on Decca's lack of promotion. In August 1971, David Sinclair accepted an offer to join former Soft Machine drummer and vocalist Robert Wyatt in a new band, Matching Mole."

Too bad, his work on the next cut is brilliant.

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1. "Nine Feet Underground" (lead vocal - Pye Hastings ["Love's a Friend"], Richard Sinclair ["Disassociation"]) 22:43
a. "Nigel Blows a Tune"
b. "Love's a Friend"
c. "Make It 76"
d. "Dance of the Seven Paper Hankies"
e. "Hold Grandad by the Nose"
f. "Honest I Did!"
g. "Disassociation"
h. "100% Proof"
David Sinclair's claim to fame as a keyboard genius, at least to my ears. Something about his tone is instantly recognizable - and this is as proggy as it gets. Love the riff, the soloing, everything. The groove the band establishes is exquisite, and when Richard comes in with the vocals I'm in ecstasy. Wiki says: "The group helped with the arranging and joining of sections, resulting in a 22-minute piece, "Nine Feet Underground". The song was recorded in five separate sections and edited together by Hitchcock and engineer Dave Grinsted. Most of the work is instrumental, aside from two sections with lyrics. David Sinclair played most of the solos on the track, and indeed the entire album, on either fuzz tone organ or piano."


I'll let wiki have the last word: "Rolling Stone listed the album as No. 34 on their list of 50 Greatest Prog Rock Albums of All Time, saying it evoked "a Middle Earth sunset, with the music wavering between medieval folk melodies and jazz-savvy musos". According to AllMusic reviewer Dave Thompson, the album is "one of the most beloved, and eccentric prog albums of them all" and "probably Caravan's finest hour". He also said that "Nine Feet Underground" was "the most for the dynamic chemistry that blended the band together" and that "Golf Girl" "emerges as the kind of song that remains stuck in your head for days after you hear it, no matter how many more records you play immediately after". Progressive rock author Stephen Lambe has said that "Nine Feet Underground" is "not just the archetypal Caravan piece but a symbol of a whole movement." Marco Rossi, writing in Record Collector said "Canterbury Scene initiates are strongly advised to start here." In the Q and Mojo Classic Special Edition Pink Floyd & The Story of Prog Rock, the album came No. 19 in its list of "40 Cosmic Rock Albums". Mojo also said In the Land of Grey and Pink was "the quintessential Canterbury album".

Nuff said.

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Last edited by Matt Wilson on 31 Aug 2021, 19:38, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 31 Aug 2021, 16:38

Matt Wilson wrote: Not sure how much love there is for them


:o




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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 31 Aug 2021, 16:41

Matt Wilson wrote:Image


Nice write up Matt

The Land of Grey - one of the greatest albums ever made

Full of music

Not 'arf!

Robust stuff!

ooooof!




.





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The Slider wrote:
Rorschach wrote:Is this one of those references that only prog goons get?

Why would you expect otherwise?

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Re: Caravan

Postby robertff » 31 Aug 2021, 17:14

Hasn't that box set you mentioned got about 200 CDs in it Matt?


I'm not a fan although i do have some of their albums which I play once in a while. I wanted to like them because I felt as though i ought to but much of what I have heard sounds a little too contrived, soulless and fey to me. I'm sure others don't think that and can find much more to hold their interest but there it is.


However the cover art for Grey and Pink is tremendous though but calling an album title 'Cunning Stunts' was rather dull.

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Re: Caravan

Postby toomanyhatz » 31 Aug 2021, 17:36

Now you're talkin' my language! I too am surprised to hear talk of any disinterest here - I'd always thought the first three were very highly regarded, and in fact had always thought of them in the same 'crossover' zone as the Moodies, Procol, or, dare I say it, Strawbs (which I guess mainly means enough pop elements to not turn off the anti-prog folks).

I'm certainly all about the first three - they instantly become a lot more ordinary, and lose some of their popness, once Dave Sinclair splits the scene - but I generally think of them as being reasonably popular here.

Anyways, looking forward. Listening to the first now and really enjoying it. (It's 'post-psych' rather than prog, isn't it?)
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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 31 Aug 2021, 17:43

I suppose I’m a fan. I’ve seen them live quite a few times. First in the mid 70s probably supporting For Girls etc then again in the 80s and 90s when reforming for occasional gigs. ITLOGAP is undoubtably the gem in their catalogue. The first album is quite charming. I only have a CD-R of the second. I must give a spin as I don’t remember it too well.
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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 31 Aug 2021, 17:53

toomanyhatz wrote:Anyways, looking forward. Listening to the first now and really enjoying it. (It's 'post-psych' rather than prog, isn't it?)


It's difficult to call any 1968 LP "prog," though there are some which are, more or less. Ars Longa Vita Brevis by the Nice, or maybe even the "In Held 'Twas in I" songs on Procol Harum's Shine on Brightly perhaps. I dunno, that might make for an interesting thread: Pre-prog albums released before In the Court of the Crimson King.

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Re: Caravan

Postby toomanyhatz » 31 Aug 2021, 19:16

I also think they're unique in that kind of laid-back, stoned groove that I guess is kind of a Canterbury thing too - Ayers had it, and Gong has it in spades - but they also both could be pretty aggressive in a way that Caravan isn't so much. (Maybe that's the dividing line between psych and prog - those sharp chords and abrupt time signatures seem like a Crimson thing.)

The downside is, of course, that it could get really laid-back - like downright soporific - but they manage to avoid that, usually.
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Re: Caravan

Postby Deebank » 31 Aug 2021, 19:28

The only tune Of theirs I know - the only one I have ever heard - is The Dog, The Dog... it was on that Prog Britannia programme.

I really like it. I’m guessing that it’s later in their career than the above - the keyboards are more ‘modern’.

With all that in mind what other tunes might I enjoy?
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Re: Caravan

Postby C » 31 Aug 2021, 19:31

For Girls that Grow Plump in the Night is as good as the second and much better than the first




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Re: Caravan

Postby slightbreeze » 31 Aug 2021, 20:37

Own three or four albums by them, but rarely play them. Brilliantly played, of course, lacking in warmth. Actually, they're just not very exciting

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Re: Caravan

Postby trans-chigley express » 31 Aug 2021, 23:58

Deebank wrote:The only tune Of theirs I know - the only one I have ever heard - is The Dog, The Dog... it was on that Prog Britannia programme.

I really like it. I’m guessing that it’s later in their career than the above - the keyboards are more ‘modern’.

With all that in mind what other tunes might I enjoy?

Try Memory Lain, Hugh/Headless from the same album, and Golf Girl from In The Land of Grey and Pink,

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Re: Caravan

Postby trans-chigley express » 01 Sep 2021, 00:09

I have 4 of their albums, all which I think are excellent, but I've not been impressed whenever I've ventured further. The stoned grooves of the second album is what I play the most these days but the the more rockier For Girls That Plump....was always my favourite.

I also have a compilation called Canterbury Tales which is actually a very fine comp and includes highlights from albums I no longer own. That's all the Caravan I need, a fairly small output of any worth but I do adore those few albums. A massive boxset seems wholly unnessary for these guys.
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Re: Caravan

Postby OUTPLAY » 01 Sep 2021, 00:09

'Place Of My Own' is wonderful.
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Re: Caravan

Postby trans-chigley express » 01 Sep 2021, 00:35

OUTPLAY wrote:'Place Of My Own' is wonderful.

Yes, another one I'd recommend to Deebank

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Re: Caravan

Postby toomanyhatz » 01 Sep 2021, 01:15

I think what I like about them is that their aims are quite modest. They're not trying to sell you on their incredible chops, they don't really do 'epics' or story songs - they're just these quirky little slices of life. Sometimes they're pretty long, but not in an overbearing way. That's just the pot talking. :D

Really enjoying IICDiAIDiAOY right now.

I've always thought it was diminishing returns after the first three, but I'm going to keep going and see if my mind changes at all.
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Re: Caravan

Postby Matt Wilson » 01 Sep 2021, 03:09

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Waterloo Lily 1972
With David Sinclair's departure the band loses its signature organ sound, but luckily, he'll be back for the next album so fret not, friends. Considered a lesser LP by some fans, this is still a damn good record with some great tunes and I have no problem ranking this up there amongst their best albums. Steve Miller (no, not that one) replaced Dave and his style is certainly jazzier, but it's still listener-friendly and like all their offerings from this era, spin it a few times and I guarantee you'll be humming along in no time.

Pye Hastings – guitars & vocals
Steve Miller – Wurlitzer electric piano, grand piano, Hammond organ, electric harpsichord
Richard Sinclair – bass & vocals
Richard Coughlan – drums

Additional personnel
Lol Coxhill – soprano saxophone (1, 2)
Phil Miller – 2nd lead guitar (2)
Jimmy Hastings – flute (5)
Mike Cotton – trumpet (5)
Barry Robinson – oboe (5)

All compositions by Richard Coughlan, Pye Hastings, Richard Sinclair except "It's Coming Soon" and "Songs and Signs" by Steve Miller.

1. "Waterloo Lily" 6:47
Funky beginning signals that this is a different direction for the group. Indeed, it sounds like nothing these guys have recorded before. To be honest, I love this song. Both harder-edged and with more down-to-earth lyrics, Miller announces his entrance with a great organ solo and their sound hasn't really changed all that much. When everything slows down before the four-minute mark, a jazz feeling which was never quite present before is apparent. This story of a prostitute could be one of their more commercial numbers, frankly.

2. "Nothing at All"
"It's Coming Soon"
"Nothing at All (Reprise)" 10:25
Another big proggy number with multiple titles which was becoming a Caravan trademark by their fourth album. Now we're noticeably in fusion territory, but not like the Soft Machine or somebody like the Mahavishnu Orchestra. They're not demonstrating their chops so much as having a friendly jam session. Now, they're soloing, which is certainly showing instrumental proficiency, but it's more Canterbury than Miles-worthy, if you follow. Having said all that - these boys can jam, and Lol Coxhill makes his presence known before things fade away after the five-minute mark.

"Miller brought a jazzier feel to the sound of Caravan than had been heard on the previous album through his stylings on the Wurlitzer piano rather than the Hammond organ favored by previous keyboardist Dave Sinclair. Guests Phil Miller and Lol Coxhill from Steve Miller's previous band Delivery play on "Nothing at all", an instrumental modeled after Miles Davis's "Right Off". Soon after Waterloo Lily, Richard Sinclair and Steve Miller left Caravan to play with Phil Miller and Coxhill in a re-formed Delivery, which led to the formation the band Hatfield and the North. - Wikipedia

3. "Songs and Signs" 3:39
Pye's vocals remind one of earlier albums, and there's a pop feel to this one. It would have sounded great on the airwaves. Alas... The ending to a great side one, and none of the songs really sound the same.

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4. "Aristocracy" 3:03
Two short tracks in a row show a certain concession to commercial interests which would always elude the band. Pye Hastings: "I wanted success. Simple as that. I was keen for Caravan to sell a lot of records. If you were to ask me to describe the dream situation for us then it would have been to emulate what Pink Floyd had, in that the band were essentially faceless - nobody would recognize them anywhere - yet everyone knew their music. Well, we got halfway to the goal, in that nobody ever recognized us. Where we fell down was by not having any records that sold." LOL.

5. "The Love in Your Eye"
"To Catch Me a Brother"
"Subsultus"
"Debouchement"
"Tilbury Kecks" 12:31
The longest number to be found here, and many people's fave song on the LP. I'd play this for folks wondering about this album. Tremendous playing and the flute solo by Jimmy Hastings is, as usual, stellar. He should have been made a permanent member. Blending a bunch of cuts together, a la "Nine Feet Underground," was this band's forte and something that not only Dave Sinclair could do. Now that I'm listening to this album again - I have to say criticism is silly. It's one of their best. There are hardly any vocals on the LP (always a plus with prog albums in my estimation), and the playing is groovy.

6. "The World is Yours" 3:40
The last track is another short one, neither worse nor necessarily better than the other two of similar length. Again - Caravan never made another record which sounded like Waterloo Lily, which is neither here nor there in reflecting one's appreciation for the album. But I do think it's another fine LP from a time when, much like Gentle Giant, they were one of the best practically unknown progressive rock bands in England.

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Re: Caravan

Postby Deebank » 01 Sep 2021, 08:33

trans-chigley express wrote:
OUTPLAY wrote:'Place Of My Own' is wonderful.

Yes, another one I'd recommend to Deebank



Cheers, I will check them out...


On a side note, was it Pye Hastings who was electrocuted by a dodgy mic at a gig in South Wales or did I imagine that?
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Re: Caravan

Postby Neil Jung » 01 Sep 2021, 12:38

Deebank wrote:
trans-chigley express wrote:
OUTPLAY wrote:'Place Of My Own' is wonderful.

Yes, another one I'd recommend to Deebank



Cheers, I will check them out...


On a side note, was it Pye Hastings who was electrocuted by a dodgy mic at a gig in South Wales or did I imagine that?


Wasn’t that Les Harvey of Stone The Crows?
[indistinct chatter]

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robertff
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Re: Caravan

Postby robertff » 01 Sep 2021, 13:31

Neil Jung wrote:
Deebank wrote:
trans-chigley express wrote:Yes, another one I'd recommend to Deebank



Cheers, I will check them out...


On a side note, was it Pye Hastings who was electrocuted by a dodgy mic at a gig in South Wales or did I imagine that?


Wasn’t that Les Harvey of Stone The Crows?




I thought that but would have needed to check.



.