Genesis

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C
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 11 Sep 2021, 10:37

Excellent write up Matt

A corker of an album

In fact, the first four are majestically robust

Yes, robustly majestic




.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Genesis

Postby trans-chigley express » 11 Sep 2021, 11:22

Matt Wilson wrote:
7. "A Trick of the Tail" (Tony Banks) 4:35
Another highlight with another solo Banks credit. Nice melody, interesting lyrics, and the usual stellar accompaniment.

Wikipedia: "The song was released as a single with "Ripples" as the B-side but failed to make any significant chart impact. The majority of the song was written in 1972 and was originally intended for the Foxtrot album. The song's rhythm, according to Banks, is partly influenced by The Beatles' "Getting Better."

The lyrics are inspired by the 1955 novel The Inheritors by British author William Golding. Like much of the album A Trick of the Tail, the song's lyrics focus on a specific character: the "Beast" who leaves his own kingdom and enters the world of humans. He is captured and put on display in a freak show after his captors refuse to believe in his kingdom. The Beast laments his decision to leave his home, describing it as a paradise covered in gold. His captors then release him in exchange for leading them to his world. However, just as they see what appears to be a "spire of gold", they find that the Beast has vanished, though they do hear his voice."

8. "Los Endos" (Steve Hackett, Mike Rutherford, Tony Banks , Phil Collins 5:46
A fabulous ending to a great LP. I'm making a ruling: Side two is better than side one. Majestic-sounding final number with spacey synths, powerful drumming (I really haven't given Phil his due on the toms in this thread - he's a superb drummer), cool riffage, etc. - and barely any words! What more do you want? Everybody seems happy with this one.

"The closing song, "Los Endos", was written by the whole band. Collins came up with the basic rhythmic structure, inspired by his work in side project Brand X and "Promise of a Fisherman" by Santana, wanting to take the looser playing style into Genesis. Banks and Hackett wrote the main themes, including reprises of "Dance on a Volcano" and "Squonk", and Collins sang a few lines from "Supper's Ready" (on the 1972 album Foxtrot) on the fade-out, as a tribute to Gabriel. The opening piece was recorded for a completely different song, "It's Yourself", which was later released as a B-side. The track became a live favourite, and continued to be played through to the 2007 Turn It On Again tour. In 2014, Hackett added the song to the playlist of his extended Genesis Revisited II tour." - Wiki


I love finding out the influences behind the songs. I'd never have connected Getting Better with A Trick of the Tail but I totally get it now after reading that Banks based the rhythm on it. The Santana influence in Los Endos is more obvious

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Re: Genesis

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 11 Sep 2021, 15:38

C wrote:Excellent write up Matt

A corker of an album

In fact, the first four are majestically robust

Yes, robustly majestic




.

I thought you did not like 4 !?
If so, good lad, yeas, good lad.
Agree, the first four are robustly majestic!
After that, its a wee bit complicated for a fan boy
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 11 Sep 2021, 16:49

ConnyOlivetti wrote:
C wrote:Excellent write up Matt

A corker of an album

In fact, the first four are majestically robust

Yes, robustly majestic




.

I thought you did not like 4 !?
If so, good lad, yeas, good lad.
Agree, the first four are robustly majestic!


No. I love all four but tend to play 1 and 2 most and 4 least




.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 11 Sep 2021, 17:30

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The Geese & The Ghost - Anthony Phillips 1977
Ant Phillips was the Peter Banks of Genesis - their original guitarist long consigned to the dustbin of history until a solo release years later. And he recorded many LPs after this. You like symphonic medieval prog? This could be your album then. Sometimes similar to Trespass and even Nursery Cryme, Phillips gets an assist from Mike and Phil (and a shitload of others, dig the credits below) and the entire endeavor has a certain charm. I have this album in 5.1, and any time I can get a progressive rock disc (especially a good one) in surround, I'm in. Therefore, if I've got it - you're getting a review!

Anthony Phillips – acoustic 12-string, 6-string, classical, electric 6 and 12-string guitars, bass guitar, dulcimer, bouzouki, synthesiser, Mellotron, harmonium, piano, organ, celeste, pin piano, drums, glockenspiel, timbales, bells and chimes, gong, lead vocals on "Collections"
Mike Rutherford – acoustic 12-string, 6-string, and classical guitars, bass guitar, organ, drums, timbales, glockenspiel, cymbals, bells
Phil Collins – lead vocals on "Which Way the Wind Blows", "God If I Saw Her Now" and "Silver Song"
Rob Phillips – oboe on "The Geese and the Ghost" and "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West"
Lazo Momulovich – oboe, cor anglais on "Henry: Portraits from Tudor Times" and "The Geese and the Ghost"
John Hackett – flute on "God If I Saw Her Now", "Collections" and "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West"
Wil Sleath – flute, baroque flute, recorder, piccolo on "Henry: Portraits from Tudor Times"
Jack Lancaster – flute, lyricon on "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West"
Charlie Martin – cello on "Chinese Mushroom Cloud" and "The Geese and the Ghost"
Kirk Trevor – cello on "Chinese Mushroom Cloud" and "The Geese and the Ghost"
Nick Hayley (with "friend") – violin on "The Geese and the Ghost"
Martin Westlake – timpani on "Henry: Portraits from Tudor Times", "Chinese Mushroom Cloud" and "The Geese and the Ghost"
Tom Newman – heckelphone
Vivienne McAuliffe – vocals on "God If I Saw Her Now"
Send Barns Orchestra
Jeremy Gilbert – conductor
Barge Rabble – voices of several friends
Ralph Bernascone – soloist

1. "Wind-Tales" (Anthony Phillips) 1:02
Opening sounds of the orchestra perhaps warming up.

Some background: "In July 1970, Phillips left Genesis after three years citing illness with glandular fever and worsening stage fright. He began to write new material at a considerable pace, completing the arrangements to "Which Way the Wind Blows", "God if I Saw Her Now", and "Henry: Portraits from Tudor Times" on the 12-string guitar within ten days of leaving the group. He put demos of these songs to tape at the studio set up in his parents' home between late July and early August 1970, receiving assistance from friends Harry Williamson and former Genesis roadie David Rootes. Having put down these early ideas Phillips began to take a greater interest in classical music. At one point, he listened to a piece by Jean Sibelius and had "one of those strange revelations" and realised he was "terribly limited" and "narrow" as a musician, and declared to himself that his guitar playing lacked enough technique. Phillips tackled this by halting development on his songs and taking lessons in piano and classical guitar, and studied orchestration and harmony over the course of the following four years at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. He also gave music lessons to pupils at two schools in Surrey, and later called it his "student period". - Wiki

2. "Which Way the Wind Blows" (Anthony Phillips) 5:51
And right away we have Collins' voice reminding us this is a Genesis production. Quite nice really, and it would have fit in perfectly on an earlier LP by the band. Pretty guitars, backing vocals, gentle melody, etc. Listening to this almost makes me sad considering Phil's current state of health. Man, this is REALLY reminding me of early Genesis.

Wikipedia: "Phillips remained in close contact with his friend and Genesis guitarist and bassist Mike Rutherford and in the spring of 1972, the two agreed to work towards a potential joint album using Phillips's demos and other 12-string guitar pieces they had written before and during Phillips's time in Genesis. Development continued in August 1973 when Phillips and Rutherford met in their spare time before latter returned to Genesis commitments, after which Phillips took charge over the album's direction and expanded its foundation of 12-string guitar based pieces towards folk and progressive rock using techniques he had learned from his orchestration tuition. Among the demos they developed during this time was their hymn tune "Take This Heart", later released by Charisma Records in 1975, and the prospective 1974 release of the single "Silver Song" with "Only Your Love" on the B-side, that included Genesis drummer Phil Collins on lead vocals and drums. Demos of the latter two were recorded at Island Studios in November 1973 with producer Rhett Davies, the former dating back to 1969 as a parting farewell to Genesis drummer John Silver. In late 1973, Phillips and Rutherford had completed writing the album during a short break in Ireland, the "Misty Battlements" of the Henry suite being the last section worked out."

3. "Henry: Portraits from Tudor Times" (i) "Fanfare" (ii) "Lute's Chorus" (iii) "Misty Battlements" (iv) "Henry Goes to War" (v) "Death of a Knight" (vi) "Triumphant Return" (Anthony Phillips, Mike Rutherford) 12:11
The length tells you this is Ant's big prog number, and I must say - the sound of the guitars he gets on this LP are great. There's more guitar on these tracks than Hackett put on the Acolyte album. Phillips and Rutherford make a nice six-and-twelve string duo. Something like this is not made with any commercial considerations, purely for the joy of making music with your friends. If you haven't heard this record, I do recommend it. NOTHING like the Gabriel album though - Peter was looking forward, Ant is looking back. No vocals on this cut. It sounds like a lot of longer prog songs in that it's comprised of sections recorded at different dates. It's quite beautiful, stunning clarity on the guitars.

Wiki: "In the spring of 1974, Phillips began to select the material that would be used for the album. This included the titles: "Which Way the Wind Blows", "God if I Saw Her Now", "Henry: Portraits from Tudor Times", "D Instrumental", "Master of Time", "Collections", "I Saw You Today", and "Autumnal". The latter song was an orchestral piece that Phillips had recorded with the orchestra at Guildhall School, but it was later removed from the final track listing due to the dissatisfaction from Charisma management. "Master of Time" was then left off as Phillips and Rutherford had run out of recording time."

4. "God If I Saw Her Now" (Anthony Phillips) 4:09
Two Phil vocals on side one make him the de facto singer on this record, but the first voice you hear is Vivienne McAuliffe's. Certainly not used to hearing a woman's voice in any Genesis affair. It's pleasant, as is everything here. John Hackett on flute. Guitars are gorgeous as expected. Wiki - "The first recording sessions took place in 1974 when Rutherford had spare time surrounding the recording of the Genesis album The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway. After choosing the final track running order, the two agreed to begin recording the basic guitar parts at Send Barns, the home of Phillips's parents in Woking, Surrey. To finance the project, Rutherford had pitched the album to Charisma and the label agreed to an advance of £3,000 which they used to purchase two reel-to-reel TEAC 4-track tape machines, a mixing desk, and outboard equipment."

Image

5. "Chinese Mushroom Cloud" Phillips, Rutherford 0:46
Even shorter than the opening track on side one.

6. "The Geese and the Ghost" Part I Part II" (Anthony Phillips, Mike Rutherford) 15:40
And here we have the piece de resistence of the project - the title track. Every adjective I've used to describe this music thus far applies here. Another strong early Genesis vibe, which I'm wondering how much of that was down to Phillips, because this seems to be his kind of music more than Hackett's. I pimped for Two Sides of Peter Banks on the Yes thread just like I'm pushing for this record here. These songs are much more structured though, and you can tell lots more time was spent in the creation of this music. The studio sheen is perfection. Is any Genesis album this well-recorded? Like the Henry song on side one, no vocals to be found here. They would only distract from the ambience created by Ant and Mike.

"After Rutherford left the project for upcoming touring commitments, matters changed in October 1974 after Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett had injured his hand, which pushed the opening dates back one month. With a narrow space of time in which to work, Rutherford rejoined Phillips in the studio and continued recording, which began with "Which Way the Wind Blows", the first track recorded, which features an electric guitar made to sound like a classical acoustic guitar. The pair soon ran into technical difficulties as the TEAC machines were creating static clicks that were heard upon playback, causing visits from numerous people who were able to fix the problem. Upon fixing, they put down tracks for all seven sections of "D Instrumental", four parts to the Henry suite, an outline of "Silver Song", and an untitled improvised guitar instrumental. The late 1974 sessions included the first overdubs recorded which featured the first of several additional musicians on the album. Phillips had his younger brother Robin play the oboe for "D Instrumental" (now called "The Geese and the Ghost") and Hackett's brother John playing the flute. The latter had completed his education and was invited by Rutherford to play on the album at a time when he considered pursuing music as a career, taking it "as a welcome sign that I had made the right decision!" Upon Rutherford's return to Genesis, Phillips continued working by himself which involved the basic tracks put down for "God if I Saw Her Now" on 26 November, and working on additional parts for the songs already put down until Christmas." - Wiki

So did you guys get that? Anthony has Steve Hackett's brother playing flute on these tracks. It truly was a family affair.

7. "Collections" (Anthony Phillips) 3:07
Piano opens up this tune and we finally get a taste of Phillips' voice - which is fine by the way. Don't know why he felt he needed someone else's pipes for this project. A slight song which doesn't overstay its welcome. Wiki - "Phillips resumed with recording on 7 April 1975, bringing in Rootes to assist in technical duties while further overdubs and other final arrangements were put down. After Genesis wrapped up touring in May, Rutherford reunited with Phillips, and the pair decided to place the finished overdubs onto 16-track tape to facilitate the parts yet to be recorded. Having learned Tom Newman's facility was available on The Argonaut, his canal boat studio in Little Venice, London, sessions began there in July. Recording soon ran into problems as the studio was still in its infancy and suffered from numerous malfunctions, plus incidents of the boat being hit by another during recording, causing restarts. Phillips's longtime producer Simon Heyworth joined the project at this time, providing assistance and encouragement. Many of the session musicians on the album were students at Guildhall who had also played on the orchestra session for "Autumnal". One of them was Martin Westlake, who arrived at the boat to record the timpani parts but found the instrument was too large to fit through the door. The problem was solved after the owners of the neighbouring barge agreed to have the timpani recorded on their boat with extended microphone leads run through to the studio. John Hackett recorded his second flute session on the Argonaut. He was the subject of a prank from Phillips, who initially handed him a flute part that he described as "Stravinsky on speed" with notes too difficult for him to play, leaving him "quake inside" for several moments before he received the real arrangement. The final session on the boat was for the vocals on "Triumphant Return", formed of several of Phillips's friends who were invited to celebrate the end of recording. They are collectively named the Barge Rabble on the album's liner notes."

8. "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West" (Anthony Phillips) 4:33
The last song segues right into this one. A soft melody which is still piano rather than guitar-driven. Got to say I prefer the six and twelve string stuff.

"The majority of the mixing duties were completed by Phillips with assistance from Heyworth after Rutherford resumed working with Genesis. The second half of "Collections" and "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West" still required further work, yet as the album neared completion in early 1976 it was presented to Charisma, and the label chose not to release it, leaving the album unfinished. A meeting with Virgin Records A&R man Simon Draper in April also came to nothing. It remained shelved due to the difficulty Phillips had in getting it released elsewhere, recalling others had deemed it "'pleasant and euphoric, but not instant'". Meanwhile, Phillips secured work in various projects and recorded his first library music compositions and in late 1976, submitted his application to study for a music degree. He then received unexpected news that Marty Scott of the US-based independent label Passport Records expressed an interest to release The Geese & the Ghost, and brought in Robin, John Hackett, and Jack Lancaster to record the incomplete woodwind sections at Send Barns in October. This was followed by a final overdubbing session at Olympic Studios in London with engineer Anton Matthews in the following month, and the album was mastered by Greg Calbi at Trident Studios. A search to find a willing UK distributor proved to be too difficult, so his manager Tony Smith, who also managed Genesis, established the Hit & Run label to secure a home release. A deal with Vertigo Records ensured its distribution to other territories, including New Zealand, Japan, and Argentina." - Wikipedia

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Re: Genesis

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 11 Sep 2021, 17:46

The Geese & The Ghost
a masterpiece for sure, love it to bits.
Always felt this to be a twin to Hacketts first solo album, got the same vibe.
Love Ants first three or four albums, great all of them.
great write up as usual Matt
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 11 Sep 2021, 18:02

Matt Wilson wrote:Jack Lancaster – flute, lyricon on "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West"


What a great multi-instrumentalist

Some may not know but the lad was a member of Blodwyn Pig

He also made a fine album with Rick van der Linden of Trace - Wild Connections

Not wishing to crap on Matt's thread [sorry!] but check this out if you are unfamiliar






.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 11 Sep 2021, 18:05

Stephen, by all means take the thread in any direction you want. I enjoy the conversation. I can always just post another review to get things back on track. Next is Seconds Out.

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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 11 Sep 2021, 18:44

Matt Wilson wrote:Next is Seconds Out.


oooof!

TUBS!




.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Re: Genesis

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 11 Sep 2021, 18:44

C wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:Jack Lancaster – flute, lyricon on "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West"


What a great multi-instrumentalist



.


Same Lancaster as on Marscape?
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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 12 Sep 2021, 18:42

Image
Seconds Out 1977
You remember when I said earlier that the Live LP from '73 was their best in-concert offering? I'm not so sure now. This one is better-recorded, with a superior song selection and the added bonus of both Bill Bruford (my fave progressive rock drummer) on one track and Chester Thompson on all the others. So I guess it's a matter of Genesis at their absolute peak in terms of personnel, vs Genesis slightly past their peak but with a better show to choose from. Either way, these are the two best live records the band made (though I think that Three Sides Live is worthy too). You can't go wrong with these two albums and both go a long way towards proving that the band weren't just a studio concoction. Steve Hackett left right after this, so it's also the last time he would be part of an LP by the group. The end of an era, folks. Most of the material is from their Gabriel time too. In the second half of the seventies, none of my favorite prog bands released a live album this good (though USA by Crimson comes close).

Tony Banks – RMI Electra piano, Hammond T. organ, ARP Pro Soloist, Mellotron 400, Epiphone 12-string guitar, backing vocals
Mike Rutherford – Shergold electric 12-string and bass guitar, 8-string bass guitar, Alvarez 12-string guitar, Moog Taurus bass pedals, backing vocals
Steve Hackett – Gibson Les Paul, Hokada 12-string guitar
Phil Collins – lead vocals, Premier and Gretsch drums

with

Chester Thompson – Pearl drums, percussion (except "The Cinema Show")
Bill Bruford – Ludwig and Hayman drums, percussion ("The Cinema Show" only)

All songs written by Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett and Mike Rutherford, except where noted.

1. "Squonk" (Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford) 6:39
Weird choice for an opener to a live album. I mean usually you want to announce your presence with authority and come out with a rocker, but since I was not a huge fan of this song in the first place - I'm gonna say this cuts the Trick of the Tail version. Maybe because it doesn't stand out on that LP and it does here simply for the fact that it's the first cut or something, I don't know...

"In July 1977, the Genesis line-up of lead singer and drummer Phil Collins, keyboardist Tony Banks, bassist Mike Rutherford, guitarist Steve Hackett, and touring drummer Chester Thompson finished a seven-month tour supporting Wind & Wuthering (1976). For their next step, the group began the process of selecting live recordings from the 1977 tour for an official release, becoming their second live album —-the first being Genesis Live (1973) - Wikipedia

2. "The Carpet Crawl" 5:27
A fine version of one of the best songs on Lamb. Phil is no Peter, but he does fine with Gabriel's material, and it's not like I wished the band apandoned their previous repertoire simply because they lost their singer. I'll bet the paying punters who attended these shows wanted to hear these songs too. Give the people what they want, indeed.

Wiki: "Seconds Out is the second live album by English progressive rock band Genesis. It was released as a double album on 14 October 1977 on Charisma Records and was their last to feature guitarist Steve Hackett prior to his departure. The majority was recorded in June 1977 at the Palais des Sports in Paris during the Wind & Wuthering Tour.

3. "Robbery, Assault and Battery"(Tony Banks, Phil Collins) 6:02
Pefunctory version of the Trick track. Fine, but nothing the studio version doesn't give you. At least the tempo picks up on this number as compared to the two previous tunes. The band is playing very well though and when Tony's keys come to the fore I'm in heaven. Wiki - "The album's credits include details of which drummer(s) are playing on each song. Mixed in with these credits are the notes "Robbery Assault & Battery – keyboard solo Phil" and "Cinema Show – Bill Bruford, Phil keyboard solo". This should be read to mean that Collins played the drum kit (along with Thompson or Bruford) during that solo, not that Collins played keyboards."

4. "Afterglow" (Tony Banks) 4:29
Now this one really is better than the W&W cut. a showcase for Phil's voice and one of Tony's finest compositions. They do it well on Three Side Live too, but I'm going with this version as it was much more fresh in '77. A fine first side, but they never really let loose on a faster-paced number, did they? I wonder if their concerts were paced like this.

"When Seconds Out was announced in the press on 8 October 1977, the news coincided with Hackett's departure from Genesis. He had announced his decision to the group two months earlier while cuts for the album were selected and mixed. Collins recalled spotting Hackett on the street while on his way to the studio and offered him a lift, but Hackett declined. Collins found out from Banks and Rutherford that Hackett had quit. Hackett later said that if he had got in the car, Collins would have been the one person to make him reconsider. On the 1990 documentary video Genesis – A History, Banks joked that Hackett was mixed out of Seconds Out as a result. Although Hackett's guitar is audible, it lacks the volume of previous albums or rough soundboard mix bootlegs from the 1977 tour. - Wikipedia

I don't think Tony was joking, by the way...

Image

5. "Firth of Fifth" 8:56
Okay, love this one. "Firth of Fifth" is practically my fave track on my favorite Genesis album, so a live take is going to make my day. I'm not disappointed either, even if this does seem to be played a tad slower than before. I have all the studio albums in 5.1 from Trespass to Abacab on those two box sets but I didn't buy the live box because I heard that Tony had taken out Peter's between-song patter on the '73 Live LP. I wouldn't put that past Banks, so I've never heard these live albums in surround. This song might be the first one I'd play though.

Wiki: "In their retrospective review, AllMusic wrote that Genesis's renderings of songs from A Trick of the Tail and Wind & Wuthering surpass the studio recordings, with "superb vocals by Collins throughout," and drumming by Chester Thompson, which they described as "at least a match for Collins' best playing." They considered the tracks from earlier albums to be weaker, however, finding Collins "...can't match the subtlety or expressiveness of Gabriel's singing, though he comes close."Foo Fighters drummer Taylor Hawkins has described Seconds Out as "one of my drum bibles" and "one of my favorite-sounding drum records too."

6. "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)" 8:45
The audience is clapping along in the beginning before they probably even know what song is starting. Or maybe they do, I don't know... I am noticing Phil's voice isn't Peter's again, but once you get past that, you sing along anyway. They stretch this number out to twice the length of the Selling England version and you know how I like lengthy Genesis songs. LOL. All of side two is comprised of Gabriel-era songs by the way.

"Later live versions of this song (such as the one on Seconds Out) feature an extended instrumental section which includes snippets of various other Genesis songs – such as "Visions of Angels", "Blood on the Rooftops", "Dancing with the Moonlit Knight" and "Stagnation" – and songs by other artists, such as "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood". In the version on The Way We Walk, snippets include "Follow You Follow Me", "That's All", "Illegal Alien" and "Your Own Special Way". Phil Collins performed a dance during these instrumentals, using a tambourine in a tight, rhythmic fashion against his hands, elbows, knees, feet, buttocks and head; this can seen in the Genesis: In Concert film from 1977, as well as the live DVDs The Way We Walk – Live in Concert (1992) and When in Rome 2007. In his memoir Not Dead Ye[/i[i]]t, Collins describes the dance as "a cross between morris dancing and John Cleese's Ministry of Silly Walks". - Wikipedia

7. "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway..." 4:59
Very similar to the studio version but played a little faster methinks. At this point in the album the pace has accelerated and a rocker like this one is appreciated. The songs on the Lamb album don't have a lot of room for improvisational sections and are jam-packed with words. I'd like to hear them streched out a bit more in the concert setting. Wiki - "After Gabriel's departure, the Phil Collins-fronted incarnation of the band performed the song often during their first few tours, usually segueing into the closing section of "The Musical Box". A live version appears on Seconds Out from 1977 as well as part of the "Old Medley" on The Way We Walk, Volume Two: The Longs from 1993. The song was also played in full during the 1998 Calling All Stations tour, with Ray Wilson on vocals.

8. "...The Musical Box (Closing Section)" 3:18
Now I would have loved had they done the full-length version of this song, but I'll take what we get here. The audience loves it, you can tell. The sequencing of these tracks is exquisite, and there's been a slow build in tension ever since the record began. We're at a peak now at about the half way point.

Image

9. "Supper's Ready" a. "Lover's Leap" b. "The Guaranteed Eternal Sanctuary Man" c. "Ikhnaton and Itsacon and Their Band of Merry Men" d. "How Dare I Be So Beautiful?" e. "Willow Farm" f. "Apocalypse in 9/8 (Co-Starring the Delicious Talents of Gabble Ratchet)" g. "As Sure as Eggs Is Eggs (Aching Men's Feet)" 24:33
Well, if you want a reason for owning this record, here ya go... Even longer than the Foxtrot version. You see, at this point in the band's history, they didn't have enough post-Gabriel top tier material to make a majority of in a live performance, so they were still doing plenty of their previous numbers because that's what they knew their audiences wanted. One of the many reasons this album is so successful is the embrace of older selections. And to pick up on what I mentioned previously - there's a pacing here which is most attractive. We go from the pumped-up audience reaction at the end of side two to a lengthy rendition of one of their best-known songs taking up all of side three. It keeps the momentum going. Whoever chose the sequencing knew what they were doing.

"On the 1976 tour for A Trick of the Tail, Mike Rutherford told a story to introduce the song. On the following year's tour for Wind & Wuthering, Phil Collins would tell Peter Gabriel's "Romeo and Juliet" story from "The Cinema Show" to introduce the song. In these stories, Juliet wore an "I Love Gary Gilmore" T-shirt and instead of saying "time for 'The Cinema Show'", Juliet said: "I want to go because I'm hungry and 'Supper's Ready'". - Wikipedia

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10. "The Cinema Show" 10:58
The best is saved for last, because everything on side four makes the grade. This is the only time Bill Bruford is heard drumming on this LP - making him a member of Genesis for this one cut. It's also the best tubs-thumpin' to be found here. Again I notice it's not Gabriel singing, but the playing here virtually surpasses that of the Selling England cut, so who cares? Another highlight, and most of the action is in the second half of the song. It really picks up after the six-minute point and you see why Bill was a drummer nonpareil in the prog universe of that time.

Wiki - Seconds Out is compiled mostly from the band's four dates at the Palais des Sports in Paris between 11–14 June 1977. The shows were recorded and broadcast in part by French radio station RTL. One track, "The Cinema Show", was recorded at the Pavillon de Paris on 23 June 1976 during the 1976 tour supporting A Trick of the Tail (1976). This features Bill Bruford on drums. "I Know What I Like" contains a snippet of the 1953 song "I Love Paris".

11. "Dance on a Volcano..." (Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Steve Hackett, Mike Rutherford) 5:09
The punters are PUMPED after that song and we go right into the opening track of the Trick album. It's been a while since we've had a non-Gabriel song and it feels like the group have earned the right to play one of their newer numbers by this point. More great drumming too!

12. "...Los Endos" (instrumental) (Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Steve Hackett, Mike Rutherford) 6:20
Superb segue into this Trick track. From the first cut on that particular LP to the last. This feels like the perfect way to close the proceedings. Hope I went some way towards selling this as a great live album, because it is!

ImageImage

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Neil Jung
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Re: Genesis

Postby Neil Jung » 13 Sep 2021, 10:23

I haven’t played it in a long time, I’ll put it on now.
[indistinct chatter]

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C
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 13 Sep 2021, 10:29

ConnyOlivetti wrote:
C wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:Jack Lancaster – flute, lyricon on "Sleepfall: The Geese Fly West"


What a great multi-instrumentalist



.


Same Lancaster as on Marscape?


Yes Conny.

Incidentally, Phil Collins plays tubs on that album




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LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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C
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 13 Sep 2021, 10:35

Neil Jung wrote:I haven’t played it in a long time,


Same here - I will play it later - it's been years. Many years

My goto live album still remains the other one but this is excellent.

Bruford's tubs on Cinema Show are outstanding. Collins and Bruford together - awesome

I saw them on that tour [W&W], and the A Trick of the Tail tour from whence Cinema Show came, and they were incredible gigs

Great write up Matt - I am certainly keen to stick it on after I've done the housework!






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LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

Hugh
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Re: Genesis

Postby Hugh » 13 Sep 2021, 12:10

I had a chat with Steve Hackett on Friday morning. You can read the interview here:

https://hifipig.com/steve-hackett-interview/

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Matt Wilson
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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 13 Sep 2021, 14:27

Interesting interview, Hugh. I must have missed the "Stepping Out" quote at the end of "Los Endos," I'll have to play it again. I wonder if Steve believes that Tony mixed him out of parts of Seconds Out. Probably good you didn't ask him that though, as they seem to still be on friendly terms

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C
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 13 Sep 2021, 15:26

Hugh wrote:I had a chat with Steve Hackett on Friday morning. You can read the interview here:

https://hifipig.com/steve-hackett-interview/


Thanks Hugh - and very enjoyable it was too.

It was a shame the lad missed the PSL it was fun




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LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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C
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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 13 Sep 2021, 19:05

Matt Wilson wrote:Image
Seconds Out 1977


Sides 1 & 2 played.

It brought back memories of the tour - particularly Phil's tambourine gymnastics on Wardrobe

Great fun!




.
LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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Matt Wilson
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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 13 Sep 2021, 19:27

C wrote:
Sides 1 & 2 played.

It brought back memories of the tour - particularly Phil's tambourine gymnastics on Wardrobe

Great fun!




.


Paul K was telling me on Facebook that you saw Caravan in '74 for the Fairfields Hall gig. That true?

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Re: Genesis

Postby trans-chigley express » 14 Sep 2021, 01:01

Hugh wrote:I had a chat with Steve Hackett on Friday morning. You can read the interview here:

https://hifipig.com/steve-hackett-interview/

Enjoyed that, thanks for posting.
He took the Genesis questions very diplomatically and in good humour :)