Genesis

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Matt Wilson
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Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 21 Aug 2021, 17:48

The initial thesis in my Yes thread was that said band were the ultimate progressive rock group of the '70s. I put that out there to see if it would get any traction - either for or against. Nobody really picked up on it though, so I'll do it again here with another band who was just as good. Genesis or Yes were the two greatest exponents of prog during the glory days of the 1970s. Both began their LP careers in 1969 with less-than-stellar debuts but quickly improved in the new decade. It's a matter of debate as to who had the greatest catalog - and I guess we should include solo albums as well. There really aren't that many solo LPs by members of Genesis during that era, but the first four Peter Gabriel records were epic. Post-prog, post-punk, almost Bowie-like in their use of experimental sounds and the studio as an instrument. Steve Hackett and Anthony Phillips also did good work at the time - and I'll review one LP each for them.

So, much like the Yes thread, I'm thinking 1969 - 1982 or thereabouts will be the focus of this one. After that, the slide into commercial interests is too obvious and though I was happy for their success with the Genesis and the Invisible Touch discs, the term 'progressive' can't really be applied any more.

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From Genesis to Revelation 1969

Peter Gabriel – lead vocals, flute
Tony Banks – Hammond organ, piano, backing vocals
Anthony Phillips – guitars, backing vocals
Mike Rutherford – bass guitar, guitar, backing vocals
John Silver – drums (except on "Silent Sun")
Additional musicians

Chris Stewart – drums on "Silent Sun"
Arthur Greenslade – strings and horn arrangement, conducting
Lou Warburton – strings and horn arrangement, conducting

All songs written by Tony Banks, Peter Gabriel, Anthony Phillips, and Mike Rutherford.

1. "Where the Sour Turns to Sweet" 3:14
Piano, finger snaps, and Peter's vocals start off the first Genesis album - which pretty much sounds nothing like the music this band will make after this. There's a pop sensibility to these songs with an orchestra (or at least strings) and horns as well. You'd be forgiven for not recognizing this as Genesis' music if you were more familiar with their '70s material before you heard this record. The lyrics want you to come join them now. Wonder how many takers they had then? This song was actually released as a 45 to promote the LP.

2. "In the Beginning" 3:42
Star Trek sounds begin the track before a basic boogie beat with Rutherford's rumbling bass grounding the proceedings. "You're in the hands of yesterday" sings Pietro, and I like this one. A psychedelic song from the time when psychedelia was morphing into prog.

3. "Fireside Song" 4:16
Tony on piano again. No synths or mellotrons on this record. Everything has a rudimentary feel compared to what they would do shortly after. Too simplistic for my tastes and longer than the first two cuts. Mike strumming an acoustic guitar throughout.

4. "The Serpent" 4:36
A different vibe than the previous songs, more atmospheric, then at about the 40 second mark, a new song begins. Peter isn't really utilizing the full extent of his voice at this early stage of his career. No dynamics, as he sings at approximately the same level during the song. Probably more a flaw in the production maybe? This is hardly a well-recorded album to be frank. This track isn't bad with another psychedelic feel. Fuzzy guitar from Rutherford buried in the mix with an honest-to-God riff as well. Rare for Mike.

5. "Am I Very Wrong?" 3:28
A slower tempo initially, with the usual piano and acoustic guitar backing. Pete's flute is overdubbed while he sings. I like the verses more than the chorus. It's weird, these cuts remind me more of demos more than fully-fledged recordings. I'm glad the guys didn't pursue this path.

6. "In the Wilderness" 3:21
More of the same. As usual, I don't pay attention to prog lyrics - assuming the worst. Am I missing anything? Anyway, not a bad chorus this time. Some of these songs might have made for quality cuts had more time been spent on the arrangements. This is one of them. All Peter hears is music, you know...

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7. "The Conqueror" 3:44
They're gonna cram even more cuts on side two. This one starts off with the same melody as the last song before becoming something else entirely. I don't know why - but this one sounds like something ELP would come up with. I can hear Greg Lake singing this. That weird, demo-like sound pervades everything though. When the strings on this album were put in, the band was relegated to one speaker, while the strings were on the other. Noel Gallagher based his "If Love is the Law" on this tune.

8. "In Hiding" 2:56
Another sing-along with acoustic guitar. Pete's solemn lyrics and strings. The LP was a resounding failure with almost no sales, and I can see why. This song goes nowhere and is not indicative of what the band was about.

9. "One Day" 3:16
Acoustic guitar and strings again. These songs are starting to all sound the same. I guess when you record an album in two days you can't expect much more than this.

10. "Window" 3:53
Supposedly, the record is supposed to be some kind of concept LP about the Bible. Maybe if I read the words (which they printed on the original record as you can see in the pictures) I'd get a better understanding of the songs. That biblical theme would follow some of Gabriel's lyrics later on - I'm thinking of "Supper's Ready" for sure, and maybe some other songs too. Almost a folk rock feel to this one.

11. "In Limbo" 3:06
Horns on this number, which I haven't noticed on the last few cuts. There is a real generic quality to this material. When the LP failed to do anything, the band almost broke up to go back to school.

12. "Silent Sun" 2:08
Supposedly a Bee Gees pastiche, which I guess you could see it as, because Peter's voice has a Gibb-like vocal inflection sometimes.

13. "A Place to Call My Own" 1:57
If they were saving the last cut for something special, this isn't it. I wasn't crazy about the first Yes album either, but it's definitely better than this...

Image

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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 21 Aug 2021, 18:49

I would say that Genesis were more the 'ultimate' progressive rock band of the 70s above Yes.

It's always a difficult one because I would define a 'prog' rock band as different to 'progressive' rock band

For example Genesis and Gentle Giant were prog bands whilst Jethro Tull and Atomic Rooster were progressive rock bands

I'm looking forward to this one Matt

Carry on!




.
slightbreeze wrote:
C wrote:Will Barclay James Harvest feature well.....?

If we get as far as a top 100, I'd certainly consider it

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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 21 Aug 2021, 18:51

The law of diminishing returns.

For me Genesis ended after Wind & Wuthering

I have zero interest in anything after that

Zero



.
slightbreeze wrote:
C wrote:Will Barclay James Harvest feature well.....?

If we get as far as a top 100, I'd certainly consider it

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Re: Genesis

Postby Six String » 21 Aug 2021, 19:13

The first Yes album was much better than the first Genesis and like C I have zero interest after W&W.
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Re: Genesis

Postby mudshark » 21 Aug 2021, 20:18

I so totally concur with C and SS! There is such it distinct difference between Prog and Progressive Rock. This discussion goes back to the Mojo days and I remember it fondly. The first Yes album is not classic but has a couple of good songs and memorable moments. Genesis' first born was really, really bad. After that they probably became the best prog band, whilst VDGG become the best progressive rock band.

And Carlsson is so spot on: Wind & Wuthering was an album I sorta kinda liked it. But that was the end of the band-as-we-knew-it. I don't listen to Genesis a lot any more. When I do it's A Trick of the Tail. I think it's their best ever, by far.

What I don't understand about these very creative virtuoso musicians is how they can go from Firth of Firth to The Living Years and still look at themselves in the mirror.

But don't mind me. Do your thing Matt. You're good at it.
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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 21 Aug 2021, 21:06

Methinks you guys are unduly harsh to say nothing after 1976 is interesting, but we shall eventually proceed to see if I can unearth some worth in the post-Hackett discography.

But for today and 1970:

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Trespass (1970)
Now this one is much better. Almost great, in fact at least it's a "good record." New drummer John Mayhew was onboard for this one LP and though everyone knows Phil Collins is the only real drummer for Genesis, Mayhew acquits himself well, and you're certainly not distracted by the drumming not being adequate. Ant Phillips plays the Peter Banks role here, only being in the band for the first two albums. Newly signed to Charisma, the production is miles better too. For the first time the band sounds progressive in the then-current sense of the term. A pastoral, folky feel with lots of layered guitars predominates and everyone plays and sings on a superior level to what went before. The first 'real' Genesis album and to continue the Yes comparison, better than their Time and a Word from the same year. Neither one is as good as Emerson, Lake and Palmer or Soft Machine's Third though. Hey, gotta keep it real.

Peter Gabriel – lead vocals, flute, accordion, tambourine, bass drum
Anthony Phillips – acoustic 12-string guitar, lead electric guitar, dulcimer, vocals
Anthony Banks – Hammond organ, piano, Mellotron, acoustic 12-string guitar, vocals
Michael Rutherford – acoustic 12-string guitar, electric bass guitar, nylon guitar, cello, vocals
John Mayhew – drums, percussion, vocals

Image

All songs written by Tony Banks, Peter Gabriel, Anthony Phillips, and Mike Rutherford.

1. "Looking for Someone" 7:08
Right away we're confronted with better sonics, singing, and playing than what we were accustomed to on the debut. Gabriel has become a very good singer seemingly overnight; the drums are forceful and the arrangement is beautiful. Kick-ass prog from a band who would go on to virtually define the term. This one cut is worth the entire From Genesis to Revelation album.

Wikipedia: "The album opens with "Looking for Someone", beginning with Gabriel's vocal accompanied only by an organ, later described as being "idiosyncratic enough to set them apart from the herd within seconds". He came up with the song which was then extended and developed by the group, starting with soul influences which move towards folk as it progresses. The coda at the end of the song was written by the group as a whole. Paul Stump wrote in 1997 that there is "the barefaced presence of a riff" from "I Am the Walrus" by the Beatles in the song."

2. "White Mountain" 6:46
Gorgeous guitars come up in volume for another cool rural vibe. I used the word "pastoral" earlier, and it applies here as well. Dylan had a quantum leap in quality from his first to second albums, and while this isn't the same thing - it's hard to think of a band/artist who improved this much after the first record. I fuckin' love this shit. If not quite as arresting as "Looking for Someone," it's almost as good. That combination of acoustic guitars, flute, and mellow vibe so fully manifested on this LP would never be so developed again with these guys. Wiki says "White Mountain" and "Dusk" had been worked out by Phillips and Rutherford before deciding to record the album."

3. "Visions of Angels" 6:53
The opening piano and acoustic guitar date this back to the first LP, and sure enough:

"Visions of Angels" was recorded for the previous album From Genesis to Revelation, but not used – the band did not think any takes of it were good enough – so it was re-recorded for Trespass. It originated from 1968 a piano piece by Phillips at a time when his piano technique was limited, but could produce a "plodding" style similar to songs by the Beach Boys and the Beatles. It has a more straightforward verse/chorus structure than some of the other songs." - Wikipedia

My least fave song on side one though. It's got that singable chorus so prevalent on the first album. Not these guys' forte. Infinitely better recorded than anything from the 1969 record obviously.


ImageImage


4. "Stagnation" 8:51
More gorgeous twelve strings, and longer than anything on the first side. They could have stuck with this type of music for a couple more albums and I would have been just fine with that direction. They would make an even better LP after this though. I love these long passages where there's no vocals - not that I ever have any issue with Peter's voice. My fave cut since the first song. The tempo really picks up right after the three-minute mark.

Wiki: "Stagnation" and "Dusk" showed Phillips and Rutherford's combined twelve-string sound, along with Banks taking a lead on piano, organ and Mellotron. This subsequently became a trademark of early Genesis. Rutherford later recalled there were around ten acoustic guitars on part of "Stagnation", but they cancelled each other out in the final mix. Gabriel described the track as a "journey song" with its lack of a more typical verse/chorus structure and the variety of mood changes it presents. At one point during its development the song was around 13 minutes long before sections were removed or altered, but the introduction remained unchanged."

5. "Dusk" 4:15
Similar vibe in terms of the guitars, it also feels like something from the first record. The sad thing is - this album didn't sell that well initially either, even though it was three times as good. Gabriel references Jesus again here.

"The songs on the album originated from one or two members bringing along ideas to develop, or the group working out an arrangement as a whole. Banks later said that "we had played live quite a bit and every song on the album had been performed on stage. We had a selection of at least twice as many songs as appeared on the album, and the versions changed rapidly." Rutherford complained that the songs had already been composed and arranged in advance, and there was little opportunity to change their sound, arrangement or direction in the studio. The band drew from Gabriel's soul influences, along with classical, pop and folk music, and made regular use of Phillips and Rutherford's twelve-string guitar playing. Gabriel was particularly fond of the combined twelve-string guitars and thought they gave the group a more unique and innovative sound. The group's songwriting during this period often originated in pairs, with Phillips and Rutherford, and Banks and Gabriel, developing songs separately and presenting them to the group for further development." - Wikipedia


6. "The Knife" 9:00
Many say this homage to The Nice is the best cut on the album. The galloping rhythm does have an Emerson quality to it to be sure, and with this being the lengthiest track you know the band was proud of it. Lots of Phillips guitar towards the end.

Wiki: "The song was unusually aggressive for Genesis at the time, as most of their work consisted of soft, pastoral acoustic textures and poetic lyrics. It features a bouncy, march-like organ riff, heavily distorted guitars and bass, and fast drumming. (Peter Gabriel said he wanted to write something that had the excitement of "Rondo" by the Nice, and the song's working title was "Nice".) In the lyrics of the song, Gabriel, influenced by a book on Gandhi, "wanted to try [to] show how all violent revolutions inevitably end up with a dictator in power". Gabriel's flute solo gave the song a peaceful interlude amid the aggressive rock elements. The song is in the key of A♭ minor, a difficult key on the flute, so in concert Gabriel would pull the two pieces of his flute apart slightly to lower its pitch by a semitone, then transpose the fingering up a semitone to A minor. Tony Banks tried to remind Gabriel to adjust the flute before each performance, but occasionally the flute solo was performed in the wrong key.

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Last edited by Matt Wilson on 21 Aug 2021, 21:36, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Genesis

Postby mudshark » 21 Aug 2021, 21:32

Matt, I respect your labour of love. in a couple of hours I'll heat up the Barbie (it's 113F out here, it might ignite by itself) and cook (and drink, of course) while listening to the album. It's been decades since I heard it. It was shite then, Wonder what it's going to do for me now. I hope lots, but I fear I'll have to switch the George Strait soon. Amarillo by morning...
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Re: Genesis

Postby Lord Rother » 21 Aug 2021, 21:35

Methinks you guys are unduly harsh to say nothing after 1976 is interesting


Indeed, I’d go so far as to say it is utter nonsense.

Okay, look down on the poppier stuff, and crap on stuff like Jesus He Knows Me and Illegal Alien (I won’t argue) but songs like Domino, Driving The Last Spike, the Duke suite, Me and Sarah Jane, Tonight x 3, are right up there with their best.

I actually don’t think these people can have even heard those songs tbh, or maybe memories are affected by the not-so-good stuff they are surrounded by.

IMHO :D

(Loving the reviews!)

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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 21 Aug 2021, 21:54

Nice write up of Trespass Matt

A lovely album, full of music and the shape of [great] things to come




.
slightbreeze wrote:
C wrote:Will Barclay James Harvest feature well.....?

If we get as far as a top 100, I'd certainly consider it

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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 21 Aug 2021, 22:03

And the last one for today:

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Nursery Cryme (1971)
Ya know how I went on and on about the difference in quality between From Genesis to Revelation and Trespass? Well, they did it again by upping the game for Nursery Cryme. Enter Phil Collins and Steve Hackett. This is the equivalent of Howe and Wakeman joining Yes - which is to say in 1971 the definitive versions of both bands came to be. And while this LP is no Fragile or The Yes Album, it's still undeniably a great prog record and one every self-respecting fan of the genre should own.

Tony Banks – Hammond organ, Mellotron, piano, electric piano, 12-string guitar, backing vocals
Mike Rutherford – bass, bass pedals, 12-string guitar, backing vocals
Peter Gabriel – lead voice, flute, oboe, bass drum, tambourine
Steve Hackett – electric guitar, 12-string guitar
Phil Collins – drums, voices, percussion, lead vocals on "For Absent Friends", co-lead vocals on "Harold the Barrel" and "Harlequin" (uncredited)

All songs composed and arranged by Tony Banks, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Steve Hackett, and Mike Rutherford.

1. "The Musical Box" 10:25
Another beautiful pastoral opening almost as if we're still in Trespass territory. But there's something different going on here. The supernatural children's fairy tale aspect, Gabriel's sensitive approach to dynamics, the arrangement, etc. All make for what these ears tell me is the first classic Genesis song. Hey, it's over ten minutes, right? That makes it more important than "The Knife!" Just kidding, but there is a correlation with regards to long Genesis songs though - at least to me. When allowed to stretch out, the results were more often good than bad. The guitar chords at about 3:40 signal the arrival of Steve Hackett and Phil is frantically drumming too. Perfection!

Wikipedia: "Though credited solely to Banks/Collins/Gabriel/Hackett/Rutherford, "The Musical Box" began as an instrumental piece written by Mike Rutherford and Anthony Phillips called "F#" (later released as "Manipulation" on the Box Set remaster). The lyrics are based on a Victorian fairy tale written by Gabriel, about two children in a country house. The girl, Cynthia, kills the boy, Henry, by cleaving his head off with a croquet mallet. She later discovers Henry's musical box. When she opens it, "Old King Cole" plays, and Henry returns as a spirit, but starts aging very quickly. This causes him to experience a lifetime's sexual desire in a few moments, and he tries to persuade Cynthia to have sexual intercourse with him. However, the noise causes his nurse to arrive, and she throws the musical box at him, destroying them both. The album cover shows Cynthia holding a croquet mallet, with a few heads lying on the ground.

Collins unusually uses mallets on his drums during the flute solo and Gabriel also plays oboe during the 'Old King Cole' section. Banks and Rutherford both play 12-string acoustic guitars, while Hackett whispers melodic phrases with his Gibson Les Paul electric guitar during the 'Old King Cole' section before playing the lead electric guitar for the rest of the song. During his brief tenure with the band, Mick Barnard added guitar parts towards the end of the song while in rehearsals, which the band liked. Hackett kept both the guitar parts from Phillips and Barnard, while adding his own pieces to the song as well."

And there you have it. The greatest Genesis track when this LP was released.

2. "For Absent Friends" 1:48
Phil announces his presence with authority by singing this little Hackett ditty which is over before it can begin. Beautiful melody and production too.

"For Absent Friends" is an acoustic song that marked Hackett's first significant writing contribution for the group, and the first Genesis song with Collins on lead vocals. After coming up with the music himself and the lyrics with Collins, Hackett recalled being shy when he presented it to Gabriel as they were the new members of the group." - Wikipedia

3. "The Return of the Giant Hogweed" 8:09
One of their most beloved Gabriel-era songs has always been a weird one, eh? But God, I love it. Dig these lengthy tracks too. Lots of little sections, almost like Brian Wilson during the Smile era. Only English eccentrics would deem an invasive weed as proper subject matter for a long song! LOL.

Wiki: "The Return of the Giant Hogweed" warns of the spread of the toxic plant Heracleum mantegazzianum after it was "captured" in Russia and brought to England by a Victorian explorer. Though the real plant is extremely toxic and dangerous, the song's lyrics are a humorous exaggeration, suggesting the plant is attempting to take over the human race. Both "The Musical Box" and "The Return of the Giant Hogweed" feature Hackett's first use of guitar tapping, a technique whereby the index finger of the plucking hand is applied directly to the guitar fret board. The opening to the latter features Hackett and Banks playing triplets in harmony."

I feel it's important to stress that Steve wasn't the first guitarist to utilize the 'tapping' technique though. That's it for side one - itself practically worth the entire Trespass album. Yes, it's that good.

ImageImage


4. "Seven Stones" 5:08
Nice Banks keys to start, and Pete is off again with another of his inscrutable tales of Gabriel import. I like his lyrics better than Jon Anderson's for what it's worth. There really isn't a mediocre song here. I've got the 5.1 mix playing now and it's putting me in a Zen-like state. Who needs meditation when you've got music? Nice Tony mellotron passages towards the end of the cut.

"Seven Stones" was conceived by Banks who used what Rutherford described as "his big, schmaltzy, music hall chords [that] he loved." Melody Maker reporter Chris Welch described the song as "strangely mournful and inconclusive." He theorized that the old man addressed in the lyric is expressing his "profound belief that the secret of success and good fortune is based purely on random events and chance." - Wiki

5. "Harold the Barrel" 3:01
This is another eccentric Peter song much like the Hogweed tune. This is what we love Genesis for though. Who else wrote songs like this? He's doing his little accents with different voices, and going from full-on rock singing to that gentle Gabrielesque thing he does so well. "You must be joking!" Short and memorable.

Wikipedia" "Harold the Barrel" showed a humorous side to Genesis, which was encouraged by Collins. The lyrics show black humour of a man contemplating suicide by jumping off a building, with wordplay influenced by John Lennon's In His Own Write. The track was recorded with Gabriel and Collins singing the song as a duet. Their vocals were mixed onto the same audio track so they cannot be separated."

Hmm, didn't know that!

6. "Harlequin" 2:56
Anudduh gorgeous melody. Loving this record! Is there a wasted moment? Pastoral again to these ears. "Harlequin" was written by Rutherford. He played two separate guitar parts on a single 12-string which he thought produced "pretty dodgy" results, and was also critical of his lyrics." - wiki

7. "The Fountain of Salmacis" 8:02
A major piece to the Nursery Cryme puzzle, "The Fountain of Salmacis" is more fantastic story-telling in the "Musical Box" mode. Cool sounds by Tony - who is much more of an atmospheric player than a virtuoso like Wakeman, Moraz, Emerson, Jobson, etc. It's often Banks' keys which are stand outs to me and I do notice what he's doing more than any other member of this band. Oh my, Steve is letting it rip at about the 3:20 point. I love how progressive rock songs change tempos, time signatures, etc. The perfect ending to their best album yet. But just wait till 1972...

Wikipedia: "The Fountain of Salmacis" tells the Greek myth of Salmacis and Hermaphroditus. It originated from a short rundown passage that Banks had come up with while at university. An earlier version of the track, entitled "Provocation", was recorded in 1970 for the soundtrack of an unreleased BBC documentary on painter Michael Jackson. The track makes use of the Mellotron, with an influence from King Crimson's In the Court of the Crimson King. Banks thought the instrument greatly complemented his piece when combined with the organ. It became the basis for "The Fountain of Salmacis" which was taken further to a complete song as the result of group jams. Hackett particularly enjoyed the time he came up with his ending guitar solo, which occurred around midnight at Luxford House during a rare moment when the group were up for recording."

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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 21 Aug 2021, 22:14

Matt Wilson wrote:The perfect ending to their best album yet.


For me, their best album

Just...




.
slightbreeze wrote:
C wrote:Will Barclay James Harvest feature well.....?

If we get as far as a top 100, I'd certainly consider it

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Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 21 Aug 2021, 22:26

C wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:The perfect ending to their best album yet.


For me, their best album

Just...




.


So now that we have established that this is your fave Genesis platter, the real question is:

Is Nursery Cryme better than either The Yes Album or Fragile in 1971?

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Re: Genesis

Postby slightbreeze » 21 Aug 2021, 23:51

C wrote:Nice write up of Trespass Matt

A lovely album, full of music and the shape of [great] things to come




.

Except the drummer seems scared to hit the skins! No wonder he departed fairly soon afterwards. Apart from that, some cracking music on view. However, with Nursery Cryme, we move to a totally different level of excellence

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Re: Genesis

Postby robertff » 22 Aug 2021, 07:05

C wrote:The law of diminishing returns.

For me Genesis ended after Wind & Wuthering

I have zero interest in anything after that

Zero



.





For me Genesis ended before they began, just can't stand their music. Bought most of their albums almost as a job lot for very nearly next to nothing just to see if I could get to like any of their music. I keep trying but I can't find anything that I like, I think they are the only prog band I can honestly say that about.


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Re: Genesis

Postby C » 22 Aug 2021, 11:34

Matt Wilson wrote:So now that we have established that this is your fave Genesis platter, the real question is:

Is Nursery Cryme better than either The Yes Album or Fragile in 1971?


A good question - the answers that automatically and consistently comes into my head are Genesis' best two albums are Nursery Cryme and Foxtrot. Yes' best two are The Yes Album and Close to the Edge

And the cop out answers - I can't distinguish between NC and TYA - they are both masterpieces.

However, if it was real Sophie's Choice it would be Nursery Cryme.

Phew, I said it! [I need to go and lie down]




.
slightbreeze wrote:
C wrote:Will Barclay James Harvest feature well.....?

If we get as far as a top 100, I'd certainly consider it

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Re: Genesis

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 22 Aug 2021, 15:45

Great write ups so far Matt!
For those who might be interested, here is a list of credits for the Genesis songs during the Gabriel era. Been around the net for some time and should be correct.

Trespass:
Looking For Someone (Banks, Gabriel, Phillips, Rutherford)
White Mountain (Phillips, Rutherford)
Visions Of Angels (Phillips)
Stagnation (Phillips, Banks, Rutherford, Gabriel)
Dusk (Phillips, Rutherford)
The Knife (Banks, Gabriel, Rutherford, Phillips)

Nursery Cryme:
The Musical Box (Phillips, Rutherford, Banks, Gabriel)
For Absent Friends (Hackett, Collins)
The Return Of The Giant Hogweed (Banks, Gabriel, Hackett, Rutherford, Collins)
Seven Stones (Banks)
Harold The Barrel (Gabriel, Banks)
Harlequin (Rutherford, Banks)
The Fountain Of Salmacis (Banks, Gabriel, Collins, Hackett, Rutherford)

Foxtrot:
Watcher Of The Skie (Banks, Rutherford)
Time Table (Banks)
Get 'Em Out By Friday (Banks, Gabriel, Rutherford, Hackett, Collins)
Can-Utility And The Coastliners (Hackett, Banks)
Horizons (Hackett)
Supper's Ready: a. Lover's Leap (Banks, Gabriel)
b. The Guaranteed Eternal Sanctuary Man (Banks, Gabriel)
c. Ikhnaton and Itsacon and Their Band of Merry Men (Rutherford, Banks, Gabriel)
d. How Dare I Be So Beautiful? (Gabriel, Banks)
e. Willow Farm (Gabriel)
f. Apocalypse in 9/8 (featuring the delicious talents of Gabble Ratchet) (Banks, Collins, Rutherford, Gabriel)
g. As Sure as Eggs is Eggs (Aching Men's Feet) (Banks, Gabriel)

Selling England By The Pound:
Dancing With The Moonlit Knight (Hackett, Banks, Gabriel, Rutherford, Collins)
I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe) (Hackett, Banks, Gabriel)
Firth Of Fifth (Banks)
More Fool Me (Rutherford, Collins)
The Battle Of Epping Forest (Banks, Gabriel, Rutherford, Collins)
After The Ordeal (Hackett, Rutherford)
The Cinema Show (Banks, Rutherford, Collins, Hackett, Gabriel)
Aisle Of Plenty (Gabriel, Hackett)

The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway:
The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway (Banks, Gabriel)
Fly on a Windshield (Hackett, Banks, Collins, Gabriel)
Broadway Melody of 1974 (Gabriel, Banks, Rutherford)
Cuckoo Cocoon (Hackett, Gabriel)
In the Cage (Banks, Gabriel, Rutherford, Collins, Hackett)
The Grand Parade of Lifeless Packaging (Gabriel, Banks, Rutherford)
Back in N.Y.C. (Rutherford, Banks, Gabriel)
Hairless Heart (Hackett)
Counting Out Time (Gabriel)
The Carpet Crawlers (Banks, Rutherford, Gabriel)
The Chamber of 32 Doors (Gabriel, Banks)
Lillywhite Lilith (Collins, Banks, Rutherford, Gabriel)
The Waiting Room (Hackett, Collins, Banks, Rutherford, Gabriel)
Anyway (Banks, Gabriel)
The Supernatural Anaesthetist (Hackett, Gabriel)
The Lamia (Banks, Gabriel)
Silent Sorrow in Empty Boats (Rutherford, Banks, Collins, Hackett, Gabriel)
Colony of Slippermen (Banks, Gabriel, Rutherford, Collins, Hackett)
Ravine (Rutherford, Banks)
The Light Dies Down on Broadway (Banks, Rutherford)
Riding the Scree (Banks, Collins, Gabriel)
In the Rapids (Rutherford, Banks, Gabriel)
It. (Banks, Gabriel, Hackett, Rutherford, Collins)
Charlie O. wrote:I think Coan and Googa are right.


Un enfant dans electronica!
Je suis!

User avatar
robertff
Posts: 7462
Joined: 20 Jul 2003, 06:59

Re: Genesis

Postby robertff » 22 Aug 2021, 19:34

C wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:So now that we have established that this is your fave Genesis platter, the real question is:

Is Nursery Cryme better than either The Yes Album or Fragile in 1971?


A good question - the answers that automatically and consistently comes into my head are Genesis' best two albums are Nursery Cryme and Foxtrot. Yes' best two are The Yes Album and Close to the Edge

And the cop out answers - I can't distinguish between NC and TYA - they are both masterpieces.

However, if it was real Sophie's Choice it would be Nursery Cryme.

.




:o


.

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mudshark
Posts: 851
Joined: 25 Jul 2003, 03:51

Re: Genesis

Postby mudshark » 22 Aug 2021, 21:19

I just can't wait for the review of The Lamb. I know/have known so many genuine Genesis fans that have tried to defend it because they so much adore their little Peter, but ultimately most of them gave in: The Lamb should never have seen the light of day.
There's a big difference between kneeling down and bending over

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Matt Wilson
Psychedelic Cowpunk
Posts: 31194
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 20:18
Location: Edge of a continent

Re: Genesis

Postby Matt Wilson » 22 Aug 2021, 22:04

mudshark wrote:I just can't wait for the review of The Lamb. I know/have known so many genuine Genesis fans that have tried to defend it because they so much adore their little Peter, but ultimately most of them gave in: The Lamb should never have seen the light of day.

I used to have issues with it too. Watch the illustrated video on youtube - it also has the lyrics at the bottom of the screen. The entire album is there with videos for every song. It's a cool gateway into the LP. That same guy (whose name escapes me) also did a video for "Supper's Ready." I'll post links to both when I get to those albums.

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Neil Jung
Watcher Of The Skies
Posts: 10747
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 18:36
Location: In the deepest ocean, bottom of the sea

Re: Genesis

Postby Neil Jung » 22 Aug 2021, 22:35

I’ll reply more fully tomorrow but just to say that for me Genesis were still a worthy Prog band as far as Duke.
Recommendations for solo albums:
Ant P - Geese And Ghost (pastoral) or Sides (proggy)
Steve H - Spectral Mornings
Mike R - Smallcreeps Day
[indistinct chatter]