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Charlie O.
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Re: Yes

Postby Charlie O. » 09 Aug 2021, 00:01

C wrote:I don't know the Howe album.

:!: Stephen!! :o

I think you'd like it. (And I wouldn't say that to anyone regarding any other Howe album I've heard.)
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Re: Yes

Postby trans-chigley express » 09 Aug 2021, 05:33

Matt Wilson wrote:5. "Look Over Your Shoulder" – 5:00
This is the one with Claire Hamill singing and sounds like a more conventional song than most of the other cuts on the record. Not one of my favorites, but once the vocals cease and the band picks it up, it's another great musical feast for the ears. The whole album is strong.



This is actually one of my favourites on the album, which I agree is strong and a step up from his first one.

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Re: Yes

Postby trans-chigley express » 09 Aug 2021, 05:47

Matt Wilson wrote:
2. "Man In A White Car" 1:18
Horn's lyrics were about seeing pop figure Gary Numan driving his Stingray, which was given to him by his record company."

Well I never knew that.

Matt Wilson wrote:4. "Into the Lens" 8:31
Another strong opener for side two, with Chris' bass being the first thing you hear before the riffs begin. How come the previous edition of the band couldn't come up with material like this for the Tormato sessions? I'll tell you why - it was originally a Horn/Downes tune.

Wikipedia: "Into the Lens" was originally completed by Horn and Downes before they joined the group, but Squire took a liking to it and wished to re-arrange it as a Yes track, which he completed with Downes. Squire later said that the track suffered a little due to the lack of time to complete the album. It features Downes using a vocoder, further highlighting the band's new sound. A version recorded by Horn and Downes only was later released on the second Buggles album, Adventures in Modern Recording (1981), with the title "I Am a Camera".

I really like The Buggles version too where they turn it into a cool little electro-pop number

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Re: Yes

Postby C » 09 Aug 2021, 20:43

Charlie O. wrote:
C wrote:I don't know the Howe album.

:!: Stephen!! :o

I think you'd like it. (And I wouldn't say that to anyone regarding any other Howe album I've heard.)



Okay - I may have laid it on a bit thick.

I don't know it well Chas - it didn't grab me at the time and I haven't heard/played it much since.

Perhaps after your recommendation I should reappraise.....




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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 10 Aug 2021, 22:00

Matt Wilson wrote:
C wrote:I would be interested in your (re)views of Camel

But already looking for the three bands you've mentioned

Keep up the good work

.


Love Camel, but I only have the first four. I should at least get I Can See Your House from Here. Would you recommend everything up through Nude?


Breathless, I Can See Your House, and Nude aren’t as strong as earlier albums but Nude would be a good place to stop as subsequent albums were a bit patchy.
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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 10 Aug 2021, 23:19

trans-chigley express wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:5. "Look Over Your Shoulder" – 5:00
This is the one with Claire Hamill singing and sounds like a more conventional song than most of the other cuts on the record. Not one of my favorites, but once the vocals cease and the band picks it up, it's another great musical feast for the ears. The whole album is strong.



This is actually one of my favourites on the album, which I agree is strong and a step up from his first one.

You mean he doesn't sing a much. Great guitarist, voice like a drain

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Re: Yes

Postby trans-chigley express » 10 Aug 2021, 23:33

slightbreeze wrote:
trans-chigley express wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:5. "Look Over Your Shoulder" – 5:00
This is the one with Claire Hamill singing and sounds like a more conventional song than most of the other cuts on the record. Not one of my favorites, but once the vocals cease and the band picks it up, it's another great musical feast for the ears. The whole album is strong.



This is actually one of my favourites on the album, which I agree is strong and a step up from his first one.

You mean he doesn't sing a much. Great guitarist, voice like a drain

If he'd used a different singer on.his debut it would have been a lot better as some of the songs are quite good until he opens his gob.

He's got better at singing over the years though as I don't mind his vocals on the couple of tracks he sings on Fly From Here

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Re: Yes

Postby C » 11 Aug 2021, 08:34

Neil Jung wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:
C wrote:I would be interested in your (re)views of Camel

But already looking for the three bands you've mentioned

Keep up the good work

.


Love Camel, but I only have the first four. I should at least get I Can See Your House from Here. Would you recommend everything up through Nude?


Breathless, I Can See Your House, and Nude aren’t as strong as earlier albums but Nude would be a good place to stop as subsequent albums were a bit patchy.


Absolutely spot on, although I am not too keen on I Can See Your House from Here, but unless I have misunderstood Rain Dances is essential too and my fave post-Moonmadness album




.
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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 11 Aug 2021, 17:20

Image
Yesshows
Not nearly as well-known as Yessongs, this release came out right after Drama and was actually mixed by Chris Squire. Comprised of live recordings from '76 - '78, it functions as a celebration of the later years of the Anderson, Wakeman, Squire, Howe, and White version of the band, with Patrick Moraz on two cuts as well. It's quite good and if you've never heard it, do so promptly. Better recorded than Yessongs, and with a more adventurous song selection too. Pity it didn't sell more as it's still relatively unknown outside of Yes circles. I guess it must have been weird to have a live double LP with the older version of the band so soon after the new album from the latest edition of the group.

Jon Anderson – lead vocals, guitar, keyboards on "Don't Kill the Whale"
Steve Howe – electric and acoustic guitars, backing vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitar, backing vocals, percussion on "Ritual"
Patrick Moraz – keyboards on "The Gates of Delirium" and "Ritual"
Rick Wakeman – keyboards on all other tracks
Alan White – drums, percussion

1. "Parallels" (Chris Squire) 24 November 1977 at Ahoy-Hal, Rotterdam 7:07
A pre-recorded musical fanfare opens the proceedings much like on the previous live LP before we realize the band is playing this Going for the One number. It's nice but surprisingly not one of the better takes on older material to be found here. Chris singing his own song.

2. "Time and a Word" (Jon Anderson, David Foster) 27 October 1978 at Empire Pool, London 4:06
Now this one is surprising. Going back to 1970 and the title track of their second album, which makes this tune older than anything on Yessongs as well. A right pleasant experience it is too.

3. "Going for the One" (Jon Anderson) 18 November 1977 at Festhalle, Frankfurt 5:18
The first rocker probably should have been the opening cut instead of the last one on side one, but it was worth the wait. I don't really get tired of this song for some reason even though I've heard it more than any other cut on the 1977 record.

Image

4. "The Gates of Delirium" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Alan White, Patrick Moraz) 17 August 1976 at Cobo Hall, Detroit 22:40
Well, here we have it - one of the reasons to own this record is an almost-twenty three minute version of one of Relayer's highlights with Moraz on keys. It's tremendous, as one might expect. I would love to hear an entire show with Patrick to see what he did with Wakeman's material.

Image

5. "Don't Kill the Whale" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire) 28 October 1978 at Empire Pool, London 4:12
I mentioned when I reviewed Tormato that this tune takes a lot of stick from folks with negative views towards that album. I don't mind it in the context there and I don't mind it here. Good solo by first Steve, then Rick.

6. "Ritual (Part 1)" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, Alan White) 17 August 1976 at Cobo Hall, Detroit 14:53
Get the Japanese CD and it combines both parts of this Topographic Oceans track into one seamless cut lasting almost 29 minutes. The purchase is worth it for this one song alone.

Image

7. "Ritual (Part 2)" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, Alan White) 17 August 1976 at Cobo Hall, Detroit 17:06
The LP divided "Ritual" into two tracks spread over two sides of the second LP. It's better as one CD song of course.

8. "Wonderous Stories" (Jon Anderson) 24 November 1977 at Ahoy-Hal, Rotterdam 3:54
I love this live version of the Going for the One cut. Crystal-clear clarity and a top notch performance.

Image
Asia
Well, this LP will take some flak here, so I'll see what I can do to rustle up any sense of justification. We're all the way into 1982 now, and it's VERY difficult to find any really good prog. I mean does Signals by Rush count? There was a good Allan Holdsworth record called i.o.u, and uh... Genesis' Three Sides Live maybe? Christ, Marillion hadn't even dropped their debut (but they did have that excellent Market Square Heroes EP). So into the dwindling fray comes Steve Howe and Geoff Downes, John Wetton (fresh from his other super group band of progressives - UK), and Carl Palmer (probably bored out of his mind with the demise of Emerson, Lake and Palmer). The music is proggy but commercial - much like the idea that UK had a few years earlier, but this time more successful in terms of sales. The album went to number one in several countries and has sold more copies than any Yes LP. In fact, it sold more in the US than any other record that year. You read that right. Roger Dean even did the cover.

John Wetton – lead vocals, bass
Geoff Downes – keyboards, backing vocals
Steve Howe – guitar, backing vocals
Carl Palmer – drums, percussion

1. "Heat of the Moment" (John Wetton, Geoff Downes) 3:48
Funny how Wetton and Downes formed such a songwriting team. Wonder if they knew each other before the formation of this band? Steve's guitar sells the music with power chords he never displayed in Yes, but then he didn't write this one, so that has to be taken into consideration. The last song written for the LP, it made top ten in the US, German, Canadian, Polish, South African, and Swiss charts.

2. "Only Time Will Tell" (John Wetton ,Geoff Downes) 4:44
Another hit from the Wetton/Downes team, and one of the highlights here. I prefer it to most of the pop songs Genesis gave us after this. Silly lyrics though. Number 17 in the states and top ten in Canada.

3. "Sole Survivor" (John Wetton, Geoff Downes) 4:48
Yep, rock radio here even played this one to death in my high school days. I'm not gonna make any grandiose claims for these tunes, but I recall being pleased that Steve and Carl were having so much success in the new decade with songs that didn't sound any worse than so many others at the time.

4. "One Step Closer" (John Wetton, Steve Howe) 4:16
The first one for which I have little to no use for. The keys are fine, I guess - but it's just another mid tempo number which certainly doesn't sound anything like Yes. Asia would fill their second album with songs like this. Numbers designed to be sung aloud with pleasing melodies and nothing challenging in the way of music at all.

5. "Time Again" (Geoff Downes, Steve Howe, Carl Palmer, John Wetton) 4:45
Well, they're trying here. All of them wrote it, it starts off with a dramatic flourish and builds slowly before the vocals begin, but it doesn't quite get anywhere. Harmonized vocals in the chorus, power chords, etc. But try to remember it five minutes after it's over. I don't know, maybe it is a highlight in terms of songs which weren't released as singles from this LP.

ImageImage

6. "Wildest Dreams" (John Wetton, Geoff Downes) 5:10
Side two begins with another radio hit here in the US. I heard this one plenty of times in high school. Steve is in fine form, and there's a certain rhythmic propulsion which Yes would adapt on many of the 90125 tunes. Another silly chorus though.

7. "Without You" (John Wetton, Steve Howe) 5:04
Geoff's synths start off this ballad written by John and Steve - who did not get along by the way. I guess Wetton had an ego when it came to this band because he thought he was the reason they were successful and he and Howe clashed repeatedly. Anyway, a dull tune.

8. "Cutting It Fine" (John Wetton, Geoff Downes, Steve Howe) 5:35
This one doesn't really inspire confidence either. They sound fine in terms of the playing, but you can tell they're not pushing the envelope anymore as musicians or songwriters. Well-produced in that eighties sort of way, but also polished to too fine a sheen if you know what I mean. Some of these tunes need more grit.

9. "Here Comes the Feeling" (John Wetton, Steve Howe) 5:42
Some of the pomp and circumstance of the earlier numbers returns here, but the song is still sunk by Wetton's slightly melodramatic vocals and corny choruses. Oh well - I still like the singles from this album.

Image
Last edited by Matt Wilson on 11 Aug 2021, 21:59, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Yes

Postby Tom Waits For No One » 11 Aug 2021, 21:50

Matt Wilson wrote:6. "Ritual (Part 1)" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman, Alan White) 17 August 1976 at Cobo Hall, Detroit 14:53
Get the Japanese CD and it combines both parts of this Topographic Oceans track into one seamless cut lasting almost 29 minutes. The purchase is worth it for this one song alone.


Just for a bit of info, the European remastered CD from 1994 has this as one track also.

Really enjoying the reviews Matt.
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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 11 Aug 2021, 22:02

Thanks, I figured the CDs of Yesshows all probably had "Ritual" as one track, but I went with the one I owned.
Just like I'm sure all the CDs of the Allman's Eat a Peach have "Mountain Jam" as one cut.

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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 11 Aug 2021, 22:13

Yesshows. I have owned it for ever but have rarely played it. Not sure why. I must try it again.

Asia. I only ever play the first two tracks. It was downhill after that.
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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 11 Aug 2021, 22:39

Neil Jung wrote:
Asia. I only ever play the first two tracks. It was downhill after that.

The 80's had a lot to answer for
Last edited by slightbreeze on 12 Aug 2021, 09:00, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 11 Aug 2021, 22:43

Neil Jung wrote:Yesshows. I have owned it for ever but have rarely played it. Not sure why. I must try it again.

Asia. I only ever play the first two tracks. It was downhill after that.

Yesshows is pretty good and Gates of Delerium is better than the studio version, but "Don't kill the whale" must be Anderson's most embarrassing song. No interest in Asia.Only ever heard "Heat of the moment" and it's horrendous. 80's production, the band ....mutton dressed as lamb, with hair highlights to boot, and Wetton's bland vocals. If you weren't aware of the personnel, they could be stablemates with REO Speedwagon

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Re: Yes

Postby trans-chigley express » 12 Aug 2021, 05:33

slightbreeze wrote: "Don't kill the whale" must be Anderson's most embarrassing song.


It was Chris Squire's (or was it a co-write?). Not that Anderson hasn't written embarrassing songs of his own, Circus of Heaven from the same album for example.

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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 12 Aug 2021, 08:57

Apparently, Squire melody and Anderson lyrics. Still dire

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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 15 Aug 2021, 18:38

Image
90125
Well, this completes my contribution to the Yes thread. Anyone else feel free to add reviews of any Yes album you like, or dislike for that matter. Though I certainly haven't heard all, or even half of the post-1983 Yes albums, I feel relatively certain that there aren't too many good ones after this. The Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe CD perhaps, or The Ladder, or maybe Magnification could be contenders. But I don't think I'm going too far out on a limb when I say after 90125 their glory days were over.

It had been a little over three years since Drama, and the band had broken up in 1981. Squire and White had recruited Trevor Rabin and even got Tony Kaye back in the fold for a band called Cinema. When Jon Anderson came onboard it seemed silly not to call the group Yes. Steve Howe was still with Asia of course.

Jon Anderson – vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitars, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitars, keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, percussion, backing vocals, Fairlight CMI
Tony Kaye – keyboards

1. "Owner of a Lonely Heart" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Trevor Horn) 4:27
When those guitars come blasting out with a riff Steve Howe never would have written, you know you're in store for something different. Once Jon's vocals come in you know it's Yes though. An MTV-friendly hit which was everywhere at the time, this was just the kick in the pants the band needed to establish them in the '80s - and I enjoy it more than any Genesis hit which would come after. Come to think of it - I like it more than any song from their album of the same year called simply Genesis. Too bad Yes couldn't come up with a song like this every couple of years or so for the rest of the decade. Their last great single. A number one hit in the states, as well as top ten in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada, Germany, Norway, Spain, and Sweden.

2. "Hold On" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire) 5:15
This was another hit here, though it didn't make the top 40. You can definitely hear Chris singing along with Jon throughout the track. I notice Rabin's guitars are more dominant in the mix than Howe's were in the past. I wonder how Steve felt about that? There's definitely a commercial vibe with this music which one might have thought beneath Yes in the '70s, but now would be the established norm for a band of this vintage trying to make it in the new decade.

3. "It Can Happen" (Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin) 5:39
Is that a sitar in the beginning? It's meant to sound like one anyway. Once again - a mainstream rock hit (as opposed to a Billboard pop hit) in America, all of these songs are listener-friendly, made-for-the-radio, post-prog pop songs. You're both reminded of the old Yes with Anderson's vocals, and cognizant of the fact that the production (most noticeably in the drums) makes this very much music of the early '80s. Chris had sung this song when it was done by Cinema, but Jon takes over the main vocal duties here with Squire adding support.

4. "Changes" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Alan White) 6:16
An almost Peter Gabrielesque opening becomes yet another big mainstream rock hit (in the states), making all of side one of 90125 a hit on US radio. Yes had never done anything like this before, and never would again of course. "But how good is the music?" I hear you ask. Well, I don't mind it at all. Is it ever going to compare to the '71 - '77 heyday? Of course not, much less the concentrated years of The Yes Album/Fragile/Close to the Edge for that matter. But then nothing compares to that - so one has to take it all into consideration. You think it's easy to merge proggy aspects with '80s production for big hit records? Genesis could do it, but precious few bands ever managed this at the time. Consider the failure of Big Generator for further elucidation.

Image

5. "Cinema" (Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Alan White, Tony Kaye) Instrumental 2:09
This was originally a much longer cut reduced to its current instrumental length for the LP - almost as an acknowledgment that huge, progressive rock tracks were no longer in the cards for our boys. At least not in 1983. I would love to hear a longer version of this.

6. "Leave It" (Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Trevor Horn) 4:10
You guessed it - another mainstream rock hit in the US, and it even made number 56 in the UK charts. Catchy, vocal-driven, which I'm sure Jon loved, even though he had no hand in writing it. There hasn't been a mediocre song on the record so far to these ears.

7. "Our Song" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Alan White) 4:16
So this one was also promoted as a 45 in the USA but I don't ever recall hearing it on the radio. Much is made of Toledo, Ohio in the lyrics, so I'm sure it was popular there. It still generated a lot of money for the band though because it was the b-side of "Owner of a Lonely Heart." Fairly average though in my estimation.

8. "City of Love" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson) 4:48
The first mundane cut on the record is thankfully saved for nearly the end. Guitar chords, harmonized vocals, standard keys, etc.

9. "Hearts" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Alan White, Toney Kaye) 7:34
The longest song on the CD might be seen as their sop to progressive rock, like throwing the prog fans a bone, I suppose. I'm not crazy about the melody or vocal line is the only problem. Some dynamics I guess, but all-in-all, it doesn't really stay with me. Anyway, most of the album is pretty good, so I'm not gonna whine about the last few tracks. Is it better than Drama? Hard to say as one's opinion about the eighties production would determine the answer.

ImageImage

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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 16 Aug 2021, 18:32

90125 was quite a shock at the time; it’s clearly primarily Trevor Robin’s album with Jon drafted in to do some singing and allow the band to be called Yes. I liked it at the time.

Whilst I haven’t played it for a while, isn’t the follow up Big Generator pretty much an attempt at a carbon copy of 90125?
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Re: Yes

Postby C » 16 Aug 2021, 19:23

Matt Wilson wrote:Image
90125
Well, this completes my contribution to the Yes thread. Anyone else feel free to add reviews of any Yes album you like, or dislike for that matter. Though I certainly haven't heard all, or even half of the post-1983 Yes albums, I feel relatively certain that there aren't too many good ones after this. The Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe CD perhaps, or The Ladder, or maybe Magnification could be contenders. But I don't think I'm going too far out on a limb when I say after 90125 their glory days were over.

It had been a little over three years since Drama, and the band had broken up in 1981. Squire and White had recruited Trevor Rabin and even got Tony Kaye back in the fold for a band called Cinema. When Jon Anderson came onboard it seemed silly not to call the group Yes. Steve Howe was still with Asia of course.

Jon Anderson – vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitars, vocals
Trevor Rabin – guitars, keyboards, vocals
Alan White – drums, percussion, backing vocals, Fairlight CMI
Tony Kaye – keyboards

1. "Owner of a Lonely Heart" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Trevor Horn) 4:27
When those guitars come blasting out with a riff Steve Howe never would have written, you know you're in store for something different. Once Jon's vocals come in you know it's Yes though. An MTV-friendly hit which was everywhere at the time, this was just the kick in the pants the band needed to establish them in the '80s - and I enjoy it more than any Genesis hit which would come after. Come to think of it - I like it more than any song from their album of the same year called simply Genesis. Too bad Yes couldn't come up with a song like this every couple of years or so for the rest of the decade. Their last great single. A number one hit in the states, as well as top ten in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada, Germany, Norway, Spain, and Sweden.

2. "Hold On" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Chris Squire) 5:15
This was another hit here, though it didn't make the top 40. You can definitely hear Chris singing along with Jon throughout the track. I notice Rabin's guitars are more dominant in the mix than Howe's were in the past. I wonder how Steve felt about that? There's definitely a commercial vibe with this music which one might have thought beneath Yes in the '70s, but now would be the established norm for a band of this vintage trying to make it in the new decade.

3. "It Can Happen" (Chris Squire, Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin) 5:39
Is that a sitar in the beginning? It's meant to sound like one anyway. Once again - a mainstream rock hit (as opposed to a Billboard pop hit) in America, all of these songs are listener-friendly, made-for-the-radio, post-prog pop songs. You're both reminded of the old Yes with Anderson's vocals, and cognizant of the fact that the production (most noticeably in the drums) makes this very much music of the early '80s. Chris had sung this song when it was done by Cinema, but Jon takes over the main vocal duties here with Squire adding support.

4. "Changes" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson, Alan White) 6:16
An almost Peter Gabrielesque opening becomes yet another big mainstream rock hit (in the states), making all of side one of 90125 a hit on US radio. Yes had never done anything like this before, and never would again of course. "But how good is the music?" I hear you ask. Well, I don't mind it at all. Is it ever going to compare to the '71 - '77 heyday? Of course not, much less the concentrated years of The Yes Album/Fragile/Close to the Edge for that matter. But then nothing compares to that - so one has to take it all into consideration. You think it's easy to merge proggy aspects with '80s production for big hit records? Genesis could do it, but precious few bands ever managed this at the time. Consider the failure of Big Generator for further elucidation.

Image

5. "Cinema" (Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Alan White, Tony Kaye) Instrumental 2:09
This was originally a much longer cut reduced to its current instrumental length for the LP - almost as an acknowledgment that huge, progressive rock tracks were no longer in the cards for our boys. At least not in 1983. I would love to hear a longer version of this.

6. "Leave It" (Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Trevor Horn) 4:10
You guessed it - another mainstream rock hit in the US, and it even made number 56 in the UK charts. Catchy, vocal-driven, which I'm sure Jon loved, even though he had no hand in writing it. There hasn't been a mediocre song on the record so far to these ears.

7. "Our Song" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Alan White) 4:16
So this one was also promoted as a 45 in the USA but I don't ever recall hearing it on the radio. Much is made of Toledo, Ohio in the lyrics, so I'm sure it was popular there. It still generated a lot of money for the band though because it was the b-side of "Owner of a Lonely Heart." Fairly average though in my estimation.

8. "City of Love" (Trevor Rabin, Jon Anderson) 4:48
The first mundane cut on the record is thankfully saved for nearly the end. Guitar chords, harmonized vocals, standard keys, etc.

9. "Hearts" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Trevor Rabin, Alan White, Toney Kaye) 7:34
The longest song on the CD might be seen as their sop to progressive rock, like throwing the prog fans a bone, I suppose. I'm not crazy about the melody or vocal line is the only problem. Some dynamics I guess, but all-in-all, it doesn't really stay with me. Anyway, most of the album is pretty good, so I'm not gonna whine about the last few tracks. Is it better than Drama? Hard to say as one's opinion about the eighties production would determine the answer.

ImageImage



A good write up of a very good album.

I had lost interest on it's release but a free ticket to see them live resparked my interest and I bought this album.


Robust stuff and full off music






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LMG wrote:Everyone I have ever met was at Baker's Airforce show where it was recorded. My boss, various ex-girlfriends, my postman was reminiscing about it the other day. My Mum went, my Dad and both sets of grandparents. I got stuck at home with a babysitter!

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robertff
Posts: 7268
Joined: 20 Jul 2003, 06:59

Re: Yes

Postby robertff » 17 Aug 2021, 06:30

I liked/like 90125, although Owner of a Lonely Heart is the track that is the standout and the rest are good enough.

This is the point where I completely lost interest and the last time I bought anything new by them, although I did find Big Generator going for a few pennies somewhere. I listen to this more than Tormato, Drama and Going For The One but by this time, if not before, they were just no longer Yes in my mind. They had had a good run but like most good things it comes to an end.


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