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Matt Wilson
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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 17 Jul 2021, 05:01

Should've reviewed this before Relayer, but I wasn't sure I was going to use it because Moraz wasn't in the band yet. Then someone posted it on 'Now Playing' and I thought, 'why not?'

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Refugee
I don’t recall if these guys had their fifteen minutes AFTER Yes came calling and snatched Patrick Moraz up, or if Refugee had acquired some degree of fame pre-Relayer. I suspect the former but maybe someone can enlighten me. A pretty good prog album from a time when labels gave money to musicians for recording this kind of music. As always, I’m no fan of Lee Jackson’s voice, but he doesn’t sing all that much on this record, and the music does the talking. Not a masterpiece, but some like it and since I own it – you’re getting a review.

• Patrick Moraz - mini-moog, AKS synthesiser, piano, electric piano, clavinet, organ, pipe organ, marimbaphone, alpine horn, electronic slinky, mellotron, occasional vocals
• Lee Jackson - bass, electric cello, guitar, 12-string acoustic guitar, lead vocals
• Brian Davison - drums, tympani, gongs, Tibetan temple bells, African drums, kabassa, broken glass

1. "Papillion" (instrumental) – (Patrick Moraz) 5:10
“Papillion” is a dazzling display of virtuosity. Moraz wasn’t really allowed to dominate the keys in Yes the way he able to here. Spacey sound effects, a rapid clip, and furious drumming make this as good an instrumental as anything on Six Wives of Henry VIII. One can imagine Jackson approaching Patrick and hoping for another Keith Emerson-type player, and being gobsmacked when he realized he’d practically got one. This one cut is worth the price of the LP.

2. “Someday” (Patrick Moraz, Lee Jackson) 5:03
And there’s Lee singing again and we have the same issues we had with The Nice. Oh, well, I’m used to it. Can’t help thinking what a real vocalist could do with this material. Naturally, I’m hearing Jon Anderson in my head, but it’s not really fair to do that so I’ll desist. Lee almost sounds like Shane MacGowan sometimes on this song. LOL. Now I can’t get that thought out of my head.

3. "Grand Canyon Suite" – (Lee Jackson, Patrick Moraz) 16:54
A very new-agey vibe permeates the beginning of this track until after a few minutes when things pick up. What does this remind me of? “Devil’s Triangle” by Crimson perhaps in places. But when the piano begins there’s a cocktail lounge jazzy thing which is most pleasant. Then, um, singing. It all is supposed to make you think of the Grand Canyon, see, and the words paint a picture in your mind and… Oh well, other bands do this kind of thing better, but it doesn’t offend either. “The Rapids” section throws a spanner in the works a bit for some progtastic playing. I always like it when excellent musicians play well rapidly, and I have to admit I never noticed what a good drummer Brian Davison was. Almost sounds like ELP in places now.

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4. “Gatecrasher” (Lee Jackson, Patrick Moraz) 1:03
Too short to create an impression but I rather liked it while it lasted.

5. "Ritt Mickley" (instrumental) (Patrick Moraz) - 5:57
Another highlight to go along with “Papillion” and the way they pound away (almost like Yes in places) makes one realize Refugee could have had a future. A mixture of progressive rock and jazz fusion maybe?

Wiki: “The title of the track "Ritt Mickley" originated from Moraz's strong French Swiss accent when he asked the other band members to play the track again but more "rhythmically"”


6. "Credo" - (Patrick Moraz,j Lee Jackson) 18:08
The longest track on a long album begins with more jazzy piano with Moraz’ Gershwinesque noodling providing forward momentum to his overdubbed synths. Before the five-minute mark though Jackson comes in like Peter Hammill and the effect changes. I think overall, I like this more than “Grand Canyon Suite” but neither are truly transcendent either. I can definitely see what the guys in Yes saw in Moraz though and why he was invited to audition. It was a wise decision to accept the offer too. After the eleven-minute mark I’m digging the cacophony of this song now. Wait, now there’s more words, dammit… Just kidding. I can see how some would see this as a highlight.

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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 17 Jul 2021, 17:12

I haven’t heard the Refugee album in about 40 plus years. But I do know that Lee Jackson should never have been let near a microphone. He’s abysmal.
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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 17 Jul 2021, 17:13

Neil Jung wrote:I haven’t heard the Refugee album in about 40 plus years. But I do know that Lee Jackson should never have been let near a microphone. He’s abysmal.


I might give it a go later. Out of academic interest.
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Re: Yes

Postby Good Night Dallas, Texas » 19 Jul 2021, 00:26

Views on Drama?

it's now my favourite Yes album after the big 3

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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 20 Jul 2021, 06:18

Okay, some more housecleaning before I resume the thread proper with the Chris Squire album. Earlier, I mentioned I was going to look for that Peter Banks album to review, but I couldn't find it. So I'm just going to listen to it on Youtube and write something. I don't like doing this because I like to hear a CD playing on my system nice and loud when I'm deciding what to say. But I'm not about to start pulling out everything in my closets looking for that Japanese disc. I haven't the stomach for it.

Anyway, this was released in 1973 so I should have touched upon it a couple of weeks ago when I was writing about Tales from Topographic Oceans, Six Wives of Henry VIII and Yessongs. So how is Two Sides of Peter Banks? Well, I like it - otherwise I wouldn't be foisting it on this thread. As I've mentioned, I'm not the biggest fan of the first two Yes albums, but I have played them more than I have this LP. This doesn't mean that I value it any less though. Banks was no Steve Howe, but then few in the prog community of guitarists were. An instrumental record and it's stronger for it. Steve's first album had him singing - and it drags down the record's appeal.

Image


Acoustic Guitar – Jan Akkerman
Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Synthesizer [Arp], Synthesizer [Mini-moog], Piano [Fender], producer - Peter Banks
Bass Guitar – John Whetton, Ray Bennett
Drums – Mike Hough, Phil Collins
Guitar – Jan Akkerman, Steve Hackett


1. Vision Of The King (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 1:25
I don't know when Peter Banks started to be called Two Sides of Peter Banks, but I guess that was the original title. My CD is called Peter Banks, but most books use the latter title. This starts off with some nice electric guitar sounds almost like Steve Howe before fading away into the next track.

2. The White Horse Vale A. On The Hill B. Lord Of The Dragon (Peter Banks) 7:13
Acoustic and electric guitars as Peter and Focus’ Jan Akkerman trade licks. Love this stuff and a definite highlight. Cool dynamics as the tracks simmers down to slight playing before blasting into…

3. Knights A. The Falcon B. The Bear (Peter Banks) 6:53
A proper prog song with a great riff to start things off. After that things go back to the slow momentum of the previous tune. It almost sounds like they’re just messing around but the mood established is quite pleasant. More than a slight resemblance to fusion here. Intense, Crimson-like riffing towards the end. Banks and Ackerman make a good team. Another ace track.

4. Battles (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 2:23
Love this one too. These cuts flow right into each other so it’s difficult to know where one ends and the next begins unless you’re paying attention.

5. Knights-Reprise (Peter Banks) 2:13
Steve Hackett is on this number and the “Knights Reprise” is just another piece of the suite of tracks which make up the album. Synths here too.

6.Last Eclipse (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 2:28
Return to slower paces and atmospheric melodies.

Image

7. Beyond The Loneliest Sea (Jan Akkerman) 3:04
Or maybe it’s this number which fits the above description. See, that’s the thing with listening to albums on youtube, you can’t tell when one song ends and the next begins when all the tracks are linked. Sure sounds moody though.

8. Stop That! (Jan Ackerman, Peter Banks) 13:44
Pretty acoustic guitar separates this from the last one. Not to mention the length. It’s almost like all of these cuts are different sections of the same song – thus the suite description. I couldn’t find any articles on the album on wiki and was too lazy to look it up elsewhere. I’m lost actually. It would be easier to write about this music and what’s happening if I could look at the CD player and know what track is playing, alas… It’s all cut from the same cloth and seems like one long number. I’m not bored in the slightest either. Like jazz, you can put it on and concentrate on something else or pay attention to what’s going on – whatever suits you. These definitely aren't songs which would be played on the radio though. They're not compositions as such and are more like structured jams with probable embellishment.

9. Get Out Of My Fridge (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 3:20
The last track isn't part of the earlier numbers. Kind've a country feel to it actually, but not in the way you'd imagine. Some more intensity and raw feeling perhaps. I like the LP, but it's not going to be for people who want songs.

All right - next time we return to 1975 and Fish Out of Water.
Last edited by Matt Wilson on 20 Jul 2021, 15:00, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Yes

Postby C » 20 Jul 2021, 08:20

Matt Wilson wrote:Okay, some more housecleaning before I resume the thread proper with the Chris Squire album. Earlier, I mentioned I was going to look for that Peter Banks album to review, but I couldn't find it. So I'm just going to listen to it on Youtube and write something. I don't like doing this because I like to hear a CD playing on my system nice and loud when I'm deciding what to say. But I'm not about to start pulling out everything in my closets looking for that Japanese disc. I haven't the stomach for it.

Anyway, this was released in 1973 so I should have touched upon it a couple of weeks ago when I was writing about Tales from Topographic Oceans, Six Wives of Henry VIII and Yessongs. So how is Two Sides of Peter Banks? Well, I like it - otherwise I wouldn't be foisting it on this thread. As I've mentioned, I'm not the biggest fan of the first two Yes albums, but I have played them more than I have this LP. This doesn't mean that I value it any less though. Banks was no Steve Howe, but then few in the prog community of guitarists were. An instrumental record and it's stronger for it. Steve's first album had him singing - and it drags down the record's appeal.

Image


Acoustic Guitar – Jan Akkerman
Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Synthesizer [Arp], Synthesizer [Mini-moog], Piano [Fender],
Bass Guitar – John Whetton, Ray Bennett
Drums – Mike Hough, Phil Collins
Guitar – Jan Akkerman, Steve Hackett


1. Vision Of The King (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 1:25
I don't know when Peter Banks started to be called Two Sides of Peter Banks, but I guess that was the original title. My CD is called Peter Banks, but most books use the latter title. This starts off with some nice electric guitar sounds almost like Steve Howe before fading away into the next track.

2. The White Horse Vale A. On The Hill B. Lord Of The Dragon (Peter Banks) 7:13
Acoustic and electric guitars as Peter and Focus’ Jan Akkerman trade licks. Love this stuff and a definite highlight. Cool dynamics as the tracks simmers down to slight playing before blasting into…

3. Knights A. The Falcon B. The Bear (Peter Banks) 6:53
A proper prog song with a great riff to start things off. After that things go back to the slow momentum of the previous tune. It almost sounds like they’re just messing around but the mood established is quite pleasant. More than a slight resemblance to fusion here. Intense, Crimson-like riffing towards the end. Banks and Ackerman make a good team. Another ace track.

4. Battles (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 2:23
Love this one too. These cuts flow right into each other so it’s difficult to know where one ends and the next begins unless you’re paying attention.

5. Knights-Reprise (Peter Banks) 2:13
Steve Hackett is on this number and the “Knights Reprise” is just another piece of the suite of tracks which make up the album. Synths here too.

6.Last Eclipse (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 2:28
Return to slower paces and atmospheric melodies.

Image

7. Beyond The Loneliest Sea (Jan Akkerman) 3:04
Or maybe it’s this number which fits the above description. See, that’s the thing with listening to albums on youtube, you can’t tell when one song ends and the next begins when all the tracks are linked. Sure sounds moody though.

8. Stop That! (Jan Ackerman, Peter Banks) 13:44
Pretty acoustic guitar separates this from the last one. Not to mention the length. It’s almost like all of these cuts are different sections of the same song – thus the suite description. I couldn’t find any articles on the album on wiki and was too lazy to look it up elsewhere. I’m lost actually. It would be easier to write about this music and what’s happening if I could look at the CD player and know what track is playing, alas… It’s all cut from the same cloth and seems like one long number. I’m not bored in the slightest either. Like jazz, you can put it on and concentrate on something else or pay attention to what’s going on – whatever suits you. These definitely aren't songs which would be played on the radio though. They're not compositions as such and are more like structured jams with probable embellishment.

9. Get Out Of My Fridge (Jan Akkerman, Peter Banks) 3:20
The last track isn't part of the earlier numbers. Kind've a country feel to it actually, but not in the way you'd imagine. Some more intensity and raw feeling perhaps. I like the LP, but it's not going to be for people who want songs.

All right - next time we return to 1975 and Fish Out of Water.


Nice

A very good album

I had forgotten Jan Ackerman co-wrote so much

I'll dig it out and give it a spin today




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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 20 Jul 2021, 08:22

It's just "ok". To be honest, never rated Banks that highly as a guitarist. If he hadn't been replaced by Howe, couldn't see Yes ever making the Holy Trinity.

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Re: Yes

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 20 Jul 2021, 10:54

Matt Wilson wrote:
Acoustic Guitar – Jan Akkerman
Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Synthesizer [Arp], Synthesizer [Mini-moog], Piano [Fender],
Bass Guitar – John Whetton, Ray Bennett
Drums – Mike Hough, Phil Collins
Guitar – Jan Akkerman, Steve Hackett



Not familiar with this album, but is Peter Banks name missing from the credits above?
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Re: Yes

Postby C » 20 Jul 2021, 12:24

ConnyOlivetti wrote:but is Peter Banks name missing from the credits above?


Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Synthesiser [ARP], Synthesiser [Mini Moog], Piano [Fender]





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toomanyhatz wrote:I'd go with a squirrel's testicle, or maybe a racoon's.

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Re: Yes

Postby C » 20 Jul 2021, 12:26

ConnyOlivetti wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:
Acoustic Guitar – Jan Akkerman
Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Synthesizer [Arp], Synthesizer [Mini-moog], Piano [Fender]- Peter Banks
Bass Guitar – John Whetton, Ray Bennett
Drums – Mike Hough, Phil Collins
Guitar – Jan Akkerman, Steve Hackett



[...] is Peter Banks name missing from the credits above?


Get a grip Conny!




:D
John aka Josh wrote:
toomanyhatz wrote:I'd go with a squirrel's testicle, or maybe a racoon's.

I'm a hedgehog testicle kind of guy.
Like onion bhajis but earthier.

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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 20 Jul 2021, 15:01

ConnyOlivetti wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:
Acoustic Guitar – Jan Akkerman
Acoustic Guitar, Guitar, Synthesizer [Arp], Synthesizer [Mini-moog], Piano [Fender],
Bass Guitar – John Whetton, Ray Bennett
Drums – Mike Hough, Phil Collins
Guitar – Jan Akkerman, Steve Hackett



Not familiar with this album, but is Peter Banks name missing from the credits above?


Fixed it.

Didn't realize people who read this thread actually looked at that stuff!

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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 22 Jul 2021, 03:35

ImageImage

All right, I got Progeny: Seven Songs from Seventy Two and thought I'd drop a few lines concerning the best Yes live set you can buy. First, it's the "source code" of Yessongs, as the liner notes suggest. Which is to say all the Alan White material on that album comes from these shows. 'So why didn't they just use these versions in place of the muddy-sounding ones on that triple LP and rerelease that CD?' you ask? Well, it's tricky. You see - Yessongs was created ("Frankensteined" is a phrase I used earlier to describe another LP - but it applies here too) by taking this portion of that song and sticking it to that section of another song, etc. You get it. Yessongs isn't an honest documentation of a live performance in other words. Not only is it an album of performances from various shows (with different drummers too), it's also an album of songs which are patched together from different performances of said songs on different nights. Not every song on the LP fits that category, but it would require more effort than Atlantic wants to put into it. So it's difficult to even guess with absolute certainty which songs on Yessongs come from which nights. Also, some of the songs were edited, with whole minutes taken out, for the vinyl records. These, obviously, are the complete performances.

Image

And then there's the issue of the Bruford material - which hasn't been found in better sound quality. So any attempt to update the tapes and remix the album wouldn't take into account those tracks. Easier to just do what Rhino did and release the shows in their entirety as a box set - already out of print I might add. Oh, and the folks responsible for the box mislabeled two of the shows on the first pressing - by far the most common printing on the used market I might add. The Athens show (discs 9 and 10) is really the Knoxville show (discs 11 and 12). No biggie, one simply switches the discs in their respective cardboard sleeves and voila! Everything is hunky dory. I got the mislabel of course, and couldn't find a seller who would answer my questions regarding this issue. They probably didn't even know about it.

Image

Image

The above is the tracklisting for all shows as the setlist is identical. Each show is two discs - so fourteen discs for seven concerts. All shows are outstanding and with the same sound quality. Conny illustrated the issues of the Dolby units being misaligned during the recording of Yessongs - causing its famous murky sound (some people actually like the sound of that record though and prefer it to the clear recordings presented here, which they find sterile. Look to the Hoffman thread for further elucidation) and much is made of how they corrected Chris' bass tone and Rick's synths for this box. The sound is different to the triple LP, but if you're used to the way Yessongs sounds, then you might not care for this 21st Century rethink of most of the 1973 album.

Image


With that out of the way...

Image
Fish Out of Water - Chris Squire
When I was coming up as a young Yes fan, outside of the Wakeman albums, most people I knew said Fish Out of Water was the best solo offering. A claim I'm not sure of anymore, but I still enjoy it plenty. Squire was a hell of a bass player, and his songs written for Yes (usually with Jon) were outstanding. His voice is neither here nor there - certainly not on Anderson's level, but better than Howe's or even Lee Jackson's if you want to go there. I've got a great 5.1 mix of this which I'm blasting as I write.

Chris Squire – lead and backing vocals, bass guitar, 12-string guitar (tracks 3 and 5)
Bill Bruford – drums, percussion
Mel Collins – tenor saxophone (track 3), alto & soprano saxophones (track 4)
Jimmy Hastings – flute (track 2)
Patrick Moraz – synthesiser, organ on track 3
Barry Rose – pipe organ (track 1)
Andrew Pryce Jackman – acoustic and electric pianos, orchestration, conductor
Julian Gaillard – strings leader
John Wilbraham – brass leader
Jim Buck – horns leader
Adrian Bett – woodwinds leader
Nikki Squire – backing vocals (track 1)

All tracks written by Chris Squire

Wiki: "When Squire started work on this, he contacted Andrew Pryce Jackman, a childhood friend and keyboardist/composer, who assisted with the album's conception and orchestration. Over the course of their collaboration, Jackman also contributed significantly to the writing. Squire offered to give him co-writing credits, but Jackman declined."

1. "Hold Out Your Hand" 4:13
Starts off nice and funky, with the bass right up front where you want it. You can really picture Anderson singing this because of Chris' higher registers, and should Yes have recorded an album in 1975, this would have been a prime candidate for inclusion. Yes later performed it live. And would you look at the musicians listed above? He's got Bill Bruford and Patrick Moraz on these sessions. Hot damn! Great Opener.

Wiki: "The introduction to "Hold Out Your Hand" features a passage played on the pipe organ at St Paul's Cathedral by cathedral organist Barry Rose, who had known Squire and Jackman during their boyhoods. The organ continues throughout the song, creating a rather original sound and reflecting Squire and Jackman's experiences together as church choristers."

2. "You by My Side" 5:00
Maybe the best thing on the record and should've been played on FM radio at the time. A pop song, really, and catchy as hell. A reflective, almost somber mood permeates and I find myself singing this sometimes during odd times of the day. It's the vocals of all things which make it.

3. "Silently Falling" 11:27
The big number from the first side and the one Chris worked on the longest. I think I'm reevaluating this record. I'm thinking these songs are ace and that it would've made a great Yes LP. The band definitely would've spruced these numbers up and added some intricacy to them, but they're fine the way they are. Squire has a soulfulness which comes out more in this arena than it does as merely a bass player in a big rock group. There's a beautiful Moraz organ solo which makes me sad he wasn't given the opportunity to record with Yes more. But I need to concentrate more on what the album is and not what it could've been, so let me go on... The music is moving along at a fast tempo until it slows down to just piano and Chris singing again. His bass is practically a lead instrument in the mix but he's not overdoing the playing either. Everything is as it should be. A memorable chorus too, just like on "You by My Side."

ImageImage

4. "Lucky Seven" 6:54
Another one which sounds like it could've received airplay. It was released as an edited 45, but it's the full-length version you want. The strings are tasteful, and used much better than on Time and a Word. There hasn't been a weak moment on this album yet. I should play it more. Crimson's Collins on sax stands out. A great little chill song to sip a glass of wine and sit on the couch to. Easy-listening prog, indeed.

5. "Safe (Canon Song)" 14:56
Piano begins the longest cut on the LP and it's more or less in keeping with the rest of the record. For some reason it doesn't resonate with me quite as much as the other tracks though. Nothing mediocre about it, maybe I just need to play it more. The song seems stretched out, like they didn't have any more material, so they just played this as long as they could.

Wiki: "A melodic passage from Yes' song "Close to the Edge" appears in the finale of "Safe (Canon Song)". The closing passage on "Safe" was played on the 4-string bass section of a double-neck guitar, using only the pickups of the 6-string guitar section."

Image
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Re: Yes

Postby C » 22 Jul 2021, 10:53

Matt Wilson wrote:Image


A great album and another splendid write-up.

Good lad

At the time, my kid brother's first wife Romaine painted that image large on their lounge/living room/sitting room wall

It looked rather good




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I'm a hedgehog testicle kind of guy.
Like onion bhajis but earthier.

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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 22 Jul 2021, 11:46

Without a doubt, "Fish out of water" is my favourite of all Yes' solo ventures. The opening two tracks are magnificent, and when you hear Chris' voice, you realise how important it was to the Yes sound. If it wasn't for the lack of guitar, could be a Yes album in the making...and we don't have the nonsense lyrics :)

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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 22 Jul 2021, 11:46

in retrospect, Yes actually need Jon's lyrics

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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 22 Jul 2021, 17:47

slightbreeze wrote:Without a doubt, "Fish out of water" is my favourite of all Yes' solo ventures. The opening two tracks are magnificent, and when you hear Chris' voice, you realise how important it was to the Yes sound. If it wasn't for the lack of guitar, could be a Yes album in the making...and we don't have the nonsense lyrics :)


My favourite too. But why didn’t he hire a guitarist - surely some tasteful guitar would have improved it? I’d ask the same question to Tony Banks, who also thought his solo albums didn’t need a guitar.
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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 22 Jul 2021, 19:58

I'd like to think that it was Chris' vision to make an album sans guitar so it didn't sound too much like Yes. As for Banks, he probably didn't want guitar because he's an arse with a huge ego. "Guitars? On my album? As if!"
Don't know if you saw the documentary about Genesis. One section was asking band members which were their favourite Genesis tracks. When it came to Banks, he chose ..... "I wrote that one" etc etc. Bet he was well pissed that he was the least successful solo artist. Compared to Gabriel, Collins, Rutherford, even Hackett, he was a none starter

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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 24 Jul 2021, 18:43

By 1976 the members of Yes were all in the process of releasing solo albums, or had just done so the previous year. Wakeman aside, I'm going to review one solo album per musician, but as I'm only picking one, they won't all be from '75 - '76. Steve Howe, for instance, released Beginnings at this time, but I like The Steve Howe Album better from 1979, and since it falls within the confines of this thread's era, I'll do that one later when I get to that year. Similarly, Bill Bruford's One of a Kind from that same time will get a look in as well. And poor old Alan White won't get a review from me at all because I don't own his Ramshackled record from '76, and have never even heard it. Tony Kaye didn't release a solo project in the '70s but he did return to the Yes fold in the early '80s, so we'll be seeing him again before this is through as I plan to go through 90125.

Image
The Story of I - Patrick Moraz

All songs written by Patrick Moraz & John McBurnie (McBurnie's input is mostly limited to the lyrics in English)

The album is based around a romantic story of a massive tower in the middle of a jungle. The tower lures people from all over the world to go inside it. Inside the tower, people are able to experience their wildest desires and fantasies. The only rule is that the people inside the tower may not fall in love with each other. However two people inside do so and decide to escape since the tower acts also as a prison which inhabitants are slaves of their own desires.

The album consists of fourteen tracks related to the story. The album, particularly the percussion section, is strongly influenced by Brazilian music. Much of the Latin percussion was recorded in Rio de Janeiro over two days in August 1975 and dubbed on to the tracks. The album uses pitch-bend controls on the synth/organ notes. The Story of I was chosen as the album of the year by Keyboard Magazine. - wiki

Patrick Moraz - keyboards, piano, synthesizers, organ, marimbaphone, additional assorted percussion
John McBurnie - lead vocals
Vivienne McAuliffe - vocals and additional lead vocals
Ray Gomez - electric lead and rhythm guitars
Jean de Antoni - electric lead and rhythm guitars
Jeff Berlin - electric basses
Alphonse Mouzon - drums (1-7)
Andy Newmark - drums (8-14)
The Percussionists of Rio de Janeiro

1. "Impact" (3:31)
All right, I'm unfamiliar with this LP, and only bought it for this thread. So I'll be navigating Swiss waters today. Moraz pulls out all the stops in this track. Lots of spacey effects in the beginning give way to a Latin-type beat with the drums. Patrick is on piano, synths, and God knows what else. Largely percussive with lots of layered synths on top. It's got that soundtrack-to-a-film vibe that so much '70s instrumental prog has.

2. "Warmer Hands" (3:31)
Exactly like the Peter Banks album, these songs blend right into each other so you can't tell where one ends and the next begins, but since he's got wordless background vocals on this track, you know it's not "Impact" anymore. Now there's words by what sounds like a chorus, but since only Vivienne McAuliffe is credited, I guess she's multi-tracking. As per my usual tradition with progressive rock albums, I'm not even going to attempt to pay attention to the words. Great solo by Patrick though.

3. "The Storm" (0:52)
Well, as you can see by the title, this short piece deals with a storm. Any questions?

4. "Cachaça (Baião)" (4:07)
Another clue from the title as to the sound of this tune - samba-type rythms pervade and there's a jolly melody. Wonder who he thinks his audience is with this one? Music for a carnivale with synths. The longest number so far.

5. "Intermezzo" (2:49)
Abrupt change of style here, as we have almost a medieval sound. Vivienne overdubbing herself again as well. Lots of piano, but then back to the synths. I like this one.

6. "Indoors" (3:44)
Segues right into this tune. Part two of "Intermezzo" basically. A furious tempo, more vocals telling the tower tale (does anyone pay attention to words on these records?). Moraz sounds as fleet-fingered as Emerson.

7. "Best Years of Our Lives" (3:59)
Ooo, mellow, laid back male vocals by John McBurnie are not really my thing. Oh well, most of side one was fine.

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8. "Descent" (1:43)
Brisk little number to start off side two with Patrick rapidly running his fingers over the keys to impress us. Well, this is why one would buy an album like this I suppose.

9. "Incantation (Procession)" (1:51) (includes a brief piece of a field recording of Amazon Indian music)
The last one went right into this one as per usual. Weird riffs with the Amazon Indian music melded in - an early exploration into World Music maybe?

10. "Dancing Now" (4:38)
More Latin drums, you can tell the songs he's putting more time into by the lengths of the numbers. McBurnie vocals again - at least I guess that's him. The most pop song here. "There's nothing new except what's been forgotten." Indeed.

11. "Impressions (The Dream)" (2:49)
Piano begins this song and we're off into a nice, jazzy tune which wouldn't sound out of place on a Rick Wakeman album. Actually, I wouldn't mind a bit more of this.

12. "Like a Child in Disguise" (4:05)
Part two of "Impressions" except this time with vocals. The singers give this a more middle-of-the-road, loungey, fusion vibe. Not to my taste, really. "Saturday makes the week." Okay.

13. "Rise and Fall" (5:34)
Now this is the longest cut on the LP, so I'm prepared to be enchanted. A funky rhythm with some guitar overlaid, more soundtrack-like musical themes, a fusionesque approach with an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink feel before the Latin rhythms come back. Patrick is working up to something big, folks. Ah, here it is - more synth solos! LOL. He made many more albums after this of course...

14. "Symphony in the Space" (2:56)
The last piece is a more delicate affair. Remember when Edward G. Robinson died as an old man in Soylent Green? They showed pleasing images of nature as he passed. I picture music like this playing in the background.

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C
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Re: Yes

Postby C » 24 Jul 2021, 23:22

slightbreeze wrote:Without a doubt, "Fish out of water" is my favourite of all Yes' solo ventures.


That and Rick's Six Wives





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John aka Josh wrote:
toomanyhatz wrote:I'd go with a squirrel's testicle, or maybe a racoon's.

I'm a hedgehog testicle kind of guy.
Like onion bhajis but earthier.

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Neil Jung
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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 25 Jul 2021, 13:37

slightbreeze wrote:I'd like to think that it was Chris' vision to make an album sans guitar so it didn't sound too much like Yes. As for Banks, he probably didn't want guitar because he's an arse with a huge ego. "Guitars? On my album? As if!"
Don't know if you saw the documentary about Genesis. One section was asking band members which were their favourite Genesis tracks. When it came to Banks, he chose ..... "I wrote that one" etc etc. Bet he was well pissed that he was the least successful solo artist. Compared to Gabriel, Collins, Rutherford, even Hackett, he was a none starter


I did see it. Steve Hackett was whitewashed from it despite being interviewed at length. Tony Banks came over as a complete arse as usual. Probably because he is.
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