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toomanyhatz
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Re: Yes

Postby toomanyhatz » 08 Jul 2021, 18:25

So anyway, about Yes...

I have tried with Close to the Edge. Many times. I assure you I've tried.

I remember an amusing conversation between Matt and Quaco at a JU in which Quaco said something about how you have to have a certain amount of life experience before you're 'ready' for it. I guess I still haven't had whatever that experience is. :D

If there's any great investment in what I think of it, when the time comes perhaps I'll give it a re-listen and see if anything has changed.

Not gonna do it with Tales from Topographic Oceans, though. Wouldn't do that to myself.
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Re: Yes

Postby yomptepi » 08 Jul 2021, 21:32

Can we get back to Yes please.
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Re: Yes

Postby yomptepi » 08 Jul 2021, 21:36

toomanyhatz wrote:So anyway, about Yes...

I have tried with Close to the Edge. Many times. I assure you I've tried.

I remember an amusing conversation between Matt and Quaco at a JU in which Quaco said something about how you have to have a certain amount of life experience before you're 'ready' for it. I guess I still haven't had whatever that experience is. :D

If there's any great investment in what I think of it, when the time comes perhaps I'll give it a re-listen and see if anything has changed.

Not gonna do it with Tales from Topographic Oceans, though. Wouldn't do that to myself.


Your loss. Great music needs you to invest in it. Yes are certainly no REO Speedwagon I'm afraid...
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Re: Yes

Postby trans-chigley express » 08 Jul 2021, 23:02

robertff wrote:Time and A Word is generally under appreciated and the forgotten 70's Yes album. A decent gatefold cover design and it might have fared longer in the memory and better sales wise.


.

They could have done with Roger Dean from the beginning, their first 3 albums are all crying out for a decent cover.

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Re: Yes

Postby Neil Jung » 08 Jul 2021, 23:50

Carlsson wrote:A quantum leap indeed (to the third album)

The first two never appealed and then they start to get going

The Yes Album and the next few that followed are awesome

Look at Bruford's T-shirt:



.


That was tremendous. Despite the T shirt. What WAS Squire wearing on his feet?
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Re: Yes

Postby Mike Boom » 09 Jul 2021, 02:56

Carlsson wrote:A quantum leap indeed (to the third album)

The first two never appealed and then they start to get going

The Yes Album and the next few that followed are awesome


.


Exactly.
Close to the Edge being their masterpiece, it’s a stunner for sure.

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Re: Yes

Postby Matt Wilson » 09 Jul 2021, 02:57

ImageImage
Fragile
Two classics in a row in 1971. This definitely put them above ELP with Tarkus and Pictures..., Genesis with Nursery Cryme, Floyd's Meddle, Aqualung, In the Land of the Grey & Pink, Acquiring the Taste, etc. A banner year for the genre, but no band released two albums of this quality (and in a little over nine months between release dates too). You want to know what my favorite Yes album is? It's this one.

Jon Anderson – lead vocals, percussion, acoustic guitar on “We Have Heaven”
Steve Howe – electric and acoustic guitars, backing vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitars, backing vocals
Rick Wakeman – Hammond organ, grand piano, RMI 368 Electra-Piano and Harpsichord, Mellotron, Minimoog synthesiser
Bill Bruford – drums

1. "Roundabout" (Jon Anderson, Steve Howe) 8:29
From the opening guitar, thundering bass, relentless drumming, and Jon's new-found ability to take the listener to new worlds merely with his voice (and maybe the cool Roger Dean LP cover), Yes have upped their game once again. The Yes Album was perfect - I wouldn't change a thing, but this album is just as good. So why do I like it better? The playing is superior for one. Howe continues to amaze but now with Rick Wakeman, they've got a guy just as good on keyboards as Steve is on the six string. "Roundabout" could be the ultimate Yes song. Complex, catchy, a marvel of production and studio recording, and radio-friendly as well. Reaching number 13 on the US Billboard charts, it became a radio staple. This one cut is better than anything on the last album in my estimation. I don't really tire of it.

2."Cans and Brahms" (instrumental) (Johannes Brahms, Arranged by Rick Wakeman) 1:34
People love to complain about the solo pieces on this LP. Here's wiki: "Wakeman later described "Cans and Brahms" as "dreadful", as contractual problems with A&M Records, with whom he was signed as a solo artist, prevented him from writing a composition of his own." So there you go, Rick couldn't put one of his own songs on the record, so he pulled a Keith Emerson and drew from the classical deck for a track barely over a minute-and-a-half. Feel better?

3. "We Have Heaven" (Jon Anderson) 1:38
Jon's experiment with multi-tracking his voice is another one not long enough to become bothersome. The lyrics are "Tell the Moon dog, tell the March hare" and "He is here, to look around." So two solo tracks in a row which don't even add up to four minutes - is this what causes some people to rate this record lower than five-star? Hmmm....

4."South Side of the Sky" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire) 7:57
I notice so far the long ones aren't as lengthy as the ones from the last LP. Another furious almost head-banging (well, mine does) opening with Steve churning out runs before Rick comes in with his beautiful piano part. I like it when Yes play long passages without Jon's lyrics (this song is about death, but you'd be forgiven for not paying attention) and this song fits that category. Plenty of pretty harmony singing though. After the middle section we're back where we were at the beginning and you realize Yes have done it again. Cool sounds from Steve at the end.

ImageImage

5."Five Per Cent for Nothing" (instrumental) (Bill Bruford) 0:35
Bill's avant piece is barely over a half-minute. Do I really need to defend it?

6."Long Distance Runaround" (Jon Anderson) 3:28
One of Anderson's best songs and another radio hit. The words wrestle with organized religion but as always, you can enjoy the tune without thinking too much about the meaning. One of the band's best-known cuts and a highlight of a record full of them.

7. "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)" (Chris Squire) 2:36
These two tracks go together and whenever I'd hear "Long Distance Runaround" on FM growing up I'd hear this next. Chris' solo piece is the best of the five offered here. Jon's church-like vocals accent the piece wonderfully.

8."Mood for a Day" (instrumental) (SteveHowe) 2:55
Love Howe's acoustic numbers. I could listen to an entire album of this. Almost supernaturally gifted in this setting. I don't think he flubs a note. As good as "The Clap?" I'd say so.

9. "Heart of the Sunrise" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Bill Bruford) 11.16
And the mighty "Heart of the Sunrise" is saved for last. Longer than anything on The Yes Album, they're really strutting their stuff here. The first part almost has a Crimson-like complexity in its furious rhythm. Wiki says it's "a track where Wakeman's classically trained background came into play; he introduced the band to the idea of recapitulation where previous segments in music are revisited." Except isn't that what they'd been doing since the first album? If you go to the previous page of this thread I've noticed the same thing in earlier songs. Oh, well, another grade-A example of why these guys were top of the heap in prog-land at the time.

Image
Close to the Edge
Many fans fave, the boys give us yet another complete and total classic the year after gifting us with two others. The iconic Yes logo is here as well on the album cover. Some say this isn't only the best album Yes ever made, it's the finest progressive rock LP as well.

1."Close to the Edge" I. "The Solid Time of Change" II. "Total Mass Retain" III. "I Get Up, I Get Down" IV. "Seasons of Man" (Jon Anderson, Steve Howe) 18:40
Well, they were leading up to this weren't they? The first side-long epic in their discography after Floyd (twice), The Nice, Van Der Graaf Generator, Caravan, ELP, and lots of others tried it. But Yes make this one count. Lots of interlocking riffs, musical passages, wonderful ensemble playing, Anderson's Siddhartha-inspired lyrics, etc. All combine to transport you to wherever Roger Dean's illustrations take place. To me it's all listener-friendly, but then one has to take the time to get to know this music. You can't just take the record out every few years and play it, hoping it'll one day grow on you. Play it in the background one afternoon for an hour or so while you clean the house or goof around on the computer or something. Listen to it on a good system too. I've got this and a few others in 5.1 (those Steven Wilson mixes) and the sound is immersive.

But you don't have to go that far. Give in to it and the music will surprise you. Prog doesn't get any better than this. This is a million miles away from punk rock, but you can love both. I've got it on right now and Wakeman is going crazy, now the band kicks in with a rockin' portion of the song with Bruford showing why he was the best progressive rock drummer around, now Jon is coming in with his uh, I'll let wiki explain: "The lyrical content became a kind of dream sequence in a way. The end verse is a dream that I had a long time ago about passing on from this world to another world, yet feeling so fantastic about it that death never frightened me ever since." I guess it's like "South Side of the Sky" then.

Image

2. "And You and I" I. "Cord of Life" II. "Eclipse" III. "The Preacher, the Teacher" IV. "The Apocalypse" (Jon Anderson Bill Bruford, Chris Squire, Steve Howe (except "Eclipse") 10:09
More brilliance in long-form. The first two sections were released in the US as a single and almost made the top 40, though I'm struggling to recall ever hearing it. The band didn't really get along while making this album, and Bill quit after its release. One can imagine Jon and Steve in control of the ship while the others were called upon to add their portions to the whole - but honestly, you can't tell listening to the album. The iteration of Yes that made Fragile and Close to the Edge was a supreme example of a band firing on all cylinders. Everyone contributes and one can't imagine anyone else playing those parts. Both this and the last cut have four distinct parts, or sections, and the ambition required to realize their fruition is impressive. A folk vibe permeates much of the song.

3."Siberian Khatru" (Jon Anderson, Steve Howe, Rick Wakeman) 8:55
Probably my favorite song on the album. Steve gives us a wonderful guitar riff at the beginning which a band like Zeppelin would have made the basis of an entire track, but Yes almost throw away so they can get to the meat of the meal. Wiki: "Khatru means 'as you wish' in the Yemeni dialect of Arabic. When we were working on it, I kept singing the word over and over again, even though I had no idea what it meant. I asked somebody to look it up for me, and when they told me the meaning, it worked for the song." - Jon Anderson. I think people tend to neglect this cut in favor of the other two, but I love the riffs and rhythm. It's too bad these five guys couldn't have gone on and made another LP after this as they seemed to be on fire in '71 - '72. Is this better than Foxtrot, Octopus, Waterloo Lily, or any of the Italian prog so prevalent that year? Uh, yeah. Is it better than Thick as a Brick? Well, let's not get hasty...

Image
The Six Wives of Henry VIII - Rick Wakeman
Rick had released an album in 1971, or rather his label Polydor did, because he'd just signed on with the Strawbs to A&M. He's just a sideman on that LP though so I'll consider this his first LP. I know Rick thinks of it that way. This is really good too. An LP of instrumentals where each song is an interpretation of Wakeman's impressions of the wives of Henry the eighth. I think you need to be English to even think up such a concept, but like I'm fond of saying regarding Jon Anderson's deep thoughts - you can just ignore the high falutin ideas and get down with the tunes. All songs by Rick Wakeman

Rick Wakeman – 2 Minimoog synthesisers, 2 400-D Mellotrons (one for vocals, sound effects and vibes; the other for brass, strings and flutes), frequency counter, custom mixer, Steinway 9' grand piano, custom-built Hammond C-3 organ, RMI electric piano and harpsichord, ARP synthesiser, Thomas Goff harpsichord, church organ at St Giles-without-Cripplegate, portative organ

Additional musicians
Bill Bruford – drums on "Catherine of Aragon" and "Anne Boleyn"
Ray Cooper – percussion on "Catherine of Aragon" and "Anne Boleyn"
Dave Cousins – electric banjo on "Catherine Howard"
Chas Cronk – bass guitar on "Catherine Howard"
Barry de Souza – drums on "Catherine Howard"
Mike Egan – guitar on "Catherine of Aragon", "Anne of Cleves", "Anne Boleyn", and "Catherine Parr"
Steve Howe – guitar on "Catherine of Aragon"
Les Hurdle – bass guitar on "Catherine of Aragon" and "Anne Boleyn"
Dave Lambert – guitar on "Catherine Howard"
Laura Lee – vocals on "Anne Boleyn"
Sylvia McNeill – vocals on "Anne Boleyn"
Judy Powell – vocals on "Catherine of Aragon"
Frank Ricotti – percussion on "Anne of Cleves", "Catherine Howard", and "Catherine Parr"
Chris Squire – bass guitar on "Catherine of Aragon"
Barry St. John – vocals on "Catherine of Aragon"
Liza Strike – vocals on "Catherine of Aragon" and "Anne Boleyn"
Alan White – drums on "Anne of Cleves", "Jane Seymour", and "Catherine Parr"
Dave Wintour – bass guitar on "Anne of Cleves" and "Catherine Parr"

1. "Catherine of Aragon" 3:44
This is one of the better ones. A forward momentum in regards to the tempo, lots of piano, a bit of organ, and even some Moog. Could have been part of a soundtrack to a film. This is the song he wanted to put on Fragile instead of "Cans and Brahms." Such a pity. Folks wouldn't be complaining about his solo piece then I'll wager. Parts of it do have a Yes flavor as Steve and Chris are playing on it.

2. "Anne of Cleves" 7:53
Another good 'un and the longest track on the album. He's got Alan White on tubs here before he was on a Yes LP. He should have brought this to Yes and let Howe and Squire add their magic. This would have been an outstanding Yes track. Rick describes this song as free-form where "there was a contradiction in what everyone was playing. The guys in the band thought I was completely barking, but it had to be like that." But it sounds like a lot of '70s fusion to me.

3. "Catherine Howard" 6:35
A nice melody starts us off and again, I can't help thinking how Yes would have handled this material. Maybe he was too new to offer songs to the band or something - but everything on side one is wonderful. Wiki again: "It features Strawbs bassist Chas Cronk, who recalled the "total confusion" when he recorded his parts as he "couldn't make head or tail of what [we] were doing. We were going through it part by part and I couldn't see how all the parts were going to match up." He later saw that Wakeman "knew exactly what he was going to do although he had nothing written down. It was all stored in his head." Lots of differing sections a la Brian Wilson during the Smile period. Frankly, I doubt Emerson could have made an album this good in the '70s.

Image

4. "Jane Seymour" 4:46
The opening has more of a classical feel to it than anything so far with Rick sounding like the Phantom of the Opera or something. Could Garth Hudson play like this? Maybe. Wiki: "The organ on "Jane Seymour" was recorded at St Giles-without-Cripplegate church in London. He had difficulty in choosing an adequate sound using the electric instruments in the studio, so he sought permission to record at the church. Wakeman did not want the music to sound overly religious, so he recorded some overdubs of drums, harpsichord, and Moog synthesiser." The least Yes-sounding song on the record. A bit creepy, but I like it.

5. "Anne Boleyn (includes "The Day Thou Gavest Lord Hath Ended")" 6:32
The last one was all organ and this one has a lot of piano for the first half. Someone thought enough of this to release it as a 45. Our good friends at wikipedia: "While recording "Anne Boleyn", Wakeman had a dream where he was in attendance at her execution which inspired him to close the track with a version of "St. Clement", the tune to the hymn "The Day Thou Gavest, Lord, is Ended" by John Ellerton. Though E. J. Hopkins is credited on the album, the piece is generally attributed to Reverend Clement Scholefield. Wakeman plays a portative organ made in the 1700s with reeds and wooden pipes, giving it a sound that he compared to someone's breath." OK... Some backing vocals add to the ambience.

6. "Catherine Parr" 7:06
The last track is another one with a possible Yes vibe. Honestly, I think any of these tracks could have been used by the band and made into something even greater. They're almost too good to waste on a solo album. But then it topped the album charts in four countries and sold millions so I guess he knew what he was doing.
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Re: Yes

Postby toomanyhatz » 09 Jul 2021, 04:58

So I listened to The Yes Album and Fragile today, and am now listening to Close to the Edge. As much as I hate to agree with Matt (kidding!), I started to be a little more accepting of the idea that Fragile might be the best of the bunch.

First off, the little excerpts are all a nice break. I think that's what's missing from CttE, which I am enjoying OK, but find a little wet despite some lovely passages.

Anyway, the short tracks serve two purposes: they give little showcases to each of the participants who were now competing egos. And they give the listener a little dial-back time where they don't have to catch all the twists and turns. And they all have a pop sense. I've always thought of "Long Distance Runaround" as closer to dreamy Beatlish pop than to what's usually referred to as prog.

Not to mention, the long songs are tons better. They have proper sections that work with the (such as it is) lyrical content. CttE (and to a lesser degree tYA) just tends to meander a lot. Perhaps because it sounds like they're vying for control (which they surely were). When Jon sings, it serves him pretty well, but Fragile doesn't leave as much room for (often dull, if I'm totally honest) lengthy instrumental passages. "South Side of the Sky" in particular really keeps moving - probably my favorite of their 'epics'.

I guess I would like CttE more if I could break it down into bite-sized pieces. But I'm finding every time I start to get into it, something tears me away. And usually it's 'oh, here comes Rick's part. Oh, here comes the lengthy guitar solo. OK, here's where the bass gets all trebly...'

Ironically, I don't think they ever sounded more like a band than they do on the full-band tracks of Fragile.

And gosh, Wakeman is BY FAR the best keyboardist they ever had. Not close. My favorite passages on both the ones he's on seem to always have his stamp on them. Pretty much any levity they allow comes from him.

Six Wives of Henry VIII will always be my favorite Yes solo album. Loved his playing in Strawbs too.
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Re: Yes

Postby toomanyhatz » 09 Jul 2021, 05:29

Oh, the other thing I'll say - "And You and I" has one very Strawbs-ish passage. Particularly notable on the alternate take. I like.

Which is reminding me that I've been thinking of doing a similar run-down on Strawbs. I think I will in a bit.
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Re: Yes

Postby trans-chigley express » 09 Jul 2021, 06:00

I've never had a problem with the solo tracks on Fragile except Wakeman's. I love Anderson's, Squire's and Howe's and Bruford's is over fast enough to not be annoying.

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Re: Yes

Postby robertff » 09 Jul 2021, 09:01

trans-chigley express wrote:
robertff wrote:Time and A Word is generally under appreciated and the forgotten 70's Yes album. A decent gatefold cover design and it might have fared longer in the memory and better sales wise.


.

They could have done with Roger Dean from the beginning, their first 3 albums are all crying out for a decent cover.



I agree, even if it hadn't been Roger Dean covers, although I really like the first cover design - a real statement of intent.


.

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Re: Yes

Postby robertff » 09 Jul 2021, 09:10

Matt Wilson wrote:Image
Fragile
Two classics in a row in 1971. This definitely put them above ELP with Tarkus and Pictures..., Genesis with Nursery Cryme, Floyd's Meddle, Aqualung, In the Land of the Grey & Pink, Acquiring the Taste, etc. A banner year for the genre, but no band released two albums of this quality (and in a little over nine months between release dates too). You want to know what my favorite Yes album is? It's this one.

Jon Anderson – lead vocals, percussion, acoustic guitar on “We Have Heaven”
Steve Howe – electric and acoustic guitars, backing vocals
Chris Squire – bass guitars, backing vocals
Rick Wakeman – Hammond organ, grand piano, RMI 368 Electra-Piano and Harpsichord, Mellotron, Minimoog synthesiser
Bill Bruford – drums

1. "Roundabout" (Jon Anderson, Steve Howe) 8:29
From the opening guitar, thundering bass, relentless drumming, and Jon's new-found ability to take the listener to new worlds merely with his voice (and maybe the cool Roger Dean LP cover), Yes have upped their game once again. The Yes Album was perfect - I wouldn't change a thing, but this album is just as good. So why do I like it better? The playing is superior for one. Howe continues to amaze but now with Rick Wakeman, they've got a guy just as good on keyboards as Steve is on the six string. "Roundabout" could be the ultimate Yes song. Complex, catchy, a marvel of production and studio recording, and radio-friendly as well. Reaching number 13 on the US Billboard charts, it became a radio staple. This one cut is better than anything on the last album in my estimation. I don't really tire of it.

2."Cans and Brahms" (instrumental) (Johannes Brahms, Arranged by Rick Wakeman) 1:34
People love to complain about the solo pieces on this LP. Here's wiki: "Wakeman later described "Cans and Brahms" as "dreadful", as contractual problems with A&M Records, with whom he was signed as a solo artist, prevented him from writing a composition of his own." So there you go, Rick couldn't put one of his own songs on the record, so he pulled a Keith Emerson and drew from the classical deck for a track barely over a minute-and-a-half. Feel better?

3. "We Have Heaven" (Jon Anderson) 1:38
Jon's experiment with multi-tracking his voice is another one not long enough to become bothersome. The lyrics are "Tell the Moon dog, tell the March hare" and "He is here, to look around." So two solo tracks in a row which don't even add up to four minutes - is this what causes some people to rate this record lower than five-star? Hmmm....

4."South Side of the Sky" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire) 7:57
I notice so far the long ones aren't as lengthy as the ones from the last LP. Another furious almost head-banging (well, mine does) opening with Steve churning out runs before Rick comes in with his beautiful piano part. I like it when Yes play long passages without Jon's lyrics (this song is about death, but you'd be forgiven for not paying attention) and this song fits that category. Plenty of pretty harmony singing though. After the middle section we're back where we were at the beginning and you realize Yes have done it again. Cool sounds from Steve at the end.

5."Five Per Cent for Nothing" (instrumental) (Bill Bruford) 0:35
Bill's avant piece is barely over a half-minute. Do I really need to defend it?

6."Long Distance Runaround" (Jon Anderson) 3:28
One of Anderson's best songs and another radio hit. The words wrestle with organized religion but as always, you can enjoy the tune without thinking too much about the meaning. One of the band's best-known cuts and a highlight of a record full of them.

7. "The Fish (Schindleria Praematurus)" (Chris Squire) 2:36
These two tracks go together and whenever I'd hear "Long Distance Runaround" on FM growing up I'd hear this next. Chris' solo piece is the best of the five offered here. Jon's church-like vocals accent the piece wonderfully.

8."Mood for a Day" (instrumental) (SteveHowe) 2:55
Love Howe's acoustic numbers. I could listen to an entire album of this. Almost supernaturally gifted in this setting. I don't think he flubs a note. As good as "The Clap?" I'd say so.

9. "Heart of the Sunrise" (Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Bill Bruford) 11.16
And the mighty "Heart of the Sunrise" is saved for last. Longer than anything on The Yes Album, they're really strutting their stuff here. The first part almost has a Crimson-like complexity in its furious rhythm. Wiki says it's "a track where Wakeman's classically trained background came into play; he introduced the band to the idea of recapitulation where previous segments in music are revisited." Except isn't that what they'd been doing since the first album? If you go to the previous page of this thread I've noticed the same thing in earlier songs. Oh, well, another grade-A example of why these guys were top of the heap in prog-land at the time.





I don't have a problem with the solo pieces on the album, quite like them in fact, just don't think they make for a rounded (if that's the right word) LP - just makes it seem bitty.



.
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Re: Yes

Postby Jimbly » 09 Jul 2021, 09:11

I've always had a problem with the solo stuff on Fragile. It's all just filler. Roundabout, South side and Heart of the Sunrise are brilliant. The rest doesn't come close.
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Re: Yes

Postby C » 09 Jul 2021, 11:08

Another excellent write up Matt - good lad




toomanyhatz wrote:Six Wives of Henry VIII will always be my favorite Yes solo album.


Agreed

This is another excellent one:

Image





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Re: Yes

Postby slightbreeze » 09 Jul 2021, 11:25

Jimbly wrote:I've always had a problem with the solo stuff on Fragile. It's all just filler. Roundabout, South side and Heart of the Sunrise are brilliant. The rest doesn't come close.

I would include "Long distant runaround" with the 3 epics, but, I too, am not overly keen on the solo pieces. Rick's is just Rick being Rick, Jon's a precursor for "Olias" (nuff said), Bill? It's drumming, Steve? Pretty but inconsequential. The best, by far, is Chris Squire. I love their version of "America", Paul Simon not Bernstein, and think it would have fit perfectly instead of the solo pieces.
"Close to edge" is peerless, probably the greatest prog rock album of all time, and enough has been said about it already without me adding anything new.
Now, "The 6 wives". I like it a lot, to be honest, but haven't played it on a regular basis for years. It's of it's time, immaculately played, full of nice melodies. With no vocals or guitar solos, it's difficult to compare it to Yes' output, and I think that's what Rick was aiming for. This is a Rick Wakeman album and should stand as such on it's own. Worthy but not essential.

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Re: Yes

Postby Rayge » 09 Jul 2021, 12:39

Matt Wilson wrote:Didn’t you recently give a warning to someone at Preludin because he disagreed with you John? Seems he’s quit posting after that as well…

No Matt, he didn't. In his capacity as a poster, rather than an admin - he leaves all that obergruppenfuehrer unpleasantness to me, he told someone to fuck off, as he so often does as a part of a 'debate' when he disagrees, and unfortunately that person – a valued poster in my view - took it literally.

I'm not taking sides, just clarifying.
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You can't play a tune on an absolute

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OUTPLAY
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Re: Yes

Postby OUTPLAY » 09 Jul 2021, 13:09

Rayge wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:Didn’t you recently give a warning to someone at Preludin because he disagreed with you John? Seems he’s quit posting after that as well…

No Matt, he didn't. In his capacity as a poster, rather than an admin - he leaves all that obergruppenfuehrer unpleasantness to me, he told someone to fuck off, as he so often does as a part of a 'debate' when he disagrees, and unfortunately that person – a valued poster in my view - took it literally.

I'm not taking sides, just clarifying.



Not quite true, Ray. He told me to fuck off.

It's all in the thread.

https://preludin.proboards.com/thread/4 ... ers?page=3

As you were.
GoogaMooga wrote:I don't know who it is that is throwing plastic bags overboard from ships, but it certainly isn't me, and I've never met anyone who does that.

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Re: Yes

Postby Jimbly » 09 Jul 2021, 13:33

OUTPLAY wrote:
Rayge wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:Didn’t you recently give a warning to someone at Preludin because he disagreed with you John? Seems he’s quit posting after that as well…

No Matt, he didn't. In his capacity as a poster, rather than an admin - he leaves all that obergruppenfuehrer unpleasantness to me, he told someone to fuck off, as he so often does as a part of a 'debate' when he disagrees, and unfortunately that person – a valued poster in my view - took it literally.

I'm not taking sides, just clarifying.



Not quite true, Ray. He told me to fuck off.

It's all in the thread.

https://preludin.proboards.com/thread/4 ... ers?page=3

As you were.



You must be FUMING.....
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Re: Yes

Postby OUTPLAY » 09 Jul 2021, 13:37

why, you....!! :x :x :x
GoogaMooga wrote:I don't know who it is that is throwing plastic bags overboard from ships, but it certainly isn't me, and I've never met anyone who does that.

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Re: Yes

Postby Rayge » 09 Jul 2021, 14:07

Jimbly wrote:
OUTPLAY wrote:
Not quite true, Ray. He told me to fuck off.

It's all in the thread.

https://preludin.proboards.com/thread/4 ... ers?page=3

As you were.



You must be FUMING.....

:lol:
In timeless moments we live forever

You can't play a tune on an absolute

Negative Capability...when a man is capable of being in uncertainties, Mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact & reason”