New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 30 Jul 2018, 09:29

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Crime thriller set in the bustling metropolis of Old Sawrey in the lake district. I wondered how it would capture the scenery and feeling of the lakes, and manage to create a convincing, gripping crime thriller. So far, I'm still wondering.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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echolalia
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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 01 Aug 2018, 00:31

Was:

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It’s heady stuff, and not always easy to read. Basically what Soja does is interpret Marxism from a geographic, not historic, perspective – the politics of space. Anyone who chose geography over history at school will sympathize. He owes a lot to the “mystical Marxist” Henri Lefebvre, apparently – I want to read Lefebvre now. Also, it’s a good summation of the whole postmodernist “project”. The text of history is a narrative, and the text of geography is a map, and we need/use more of the latter in our increasingly simultaneous world. So there.

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More imperilled cities… nobody takes the train in this one cause they’re already on it - and it's always late. I’ll read the next Christopher Priest soon – he’s very more-ish.

Am:

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I’ve just started this and it looks promising. The deep sea diver is a professional dreamer who makes his living by bringing back stuff from his dreams which is highly prized as art. Where it’s all going I don’t know but the first chapter, an account of the diver’s heist of a jewellery store in the underwater world, was completely fucking fucked up. “In the dream life you need a rubber soul.”

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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 01 Aug 2018, 12:13

Just into the last chapter of this :

Image

A fascinating in depth analysis of the great film...... by our own Matthew Spektor (who used to post as either The Leviathan or The Electrician - I think?).

Great read if you love the film - it certainly opens up a few possibilities I've not previously considered.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jeemo » 01 Aug 2018, 20:49

Diamond Dog wrote:Just into the last chapter of this :

Image

A fascinating in depth analysis of the great film...... by our own Matthew Spektor (who used to post as either The Leviathan or The Electrician - I think?).

Great read if you love the film - it certainly opens up a few possibilities I've not previously considered.


The Electrician was Hugo that wrote the 33 1/3 book on Low.

Leviathan was Paul from Edinburgh.

i think
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 01 Aug 2018, 20:50

Jeemo wrote:
Diamond Dog wrote:Just into the last chapter of this :

Image

A fascinating in depth analysis of the great film...... by our own Matthew Spektor (who used to post as either The Leviathan or The Electrician - I think?).

Great read if you love the film - it certainly opens up a few possibilities I've not previously considered.


The Electrician was Hugo that wrote the 33 1/3 book on Low.

Leviathan was Paul from Edinburgh.

i think


Yes I have the Low book... and I think you're right on The Leviathan too Jim!

So - who was Matthew Spektor on here?!
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 01 Aug 2018, 21:02

He was, apparently, m spektor!
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”
"Don't be seduced into thinking that which did not make a profit is without value"
"'Seize the moments as they fly, know to live and learn to die'."

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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 01 Aug 2018, 22:35

He also wrote American Dream Machine (good) and the introduction to Eve Babitz's Slow Days, Fast Company. Good to see he has a new book out.

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Re: New now reading

Postby never/ever » 04 Aug 2018, 11:41

https://mma.napubcoonline.com/cgi-bin/m ... ------1---

This is brilliant!

NR- Trans Oceanic Trouser Press October 1977
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 04 Aug 2018, 23:50

never/ever wrote:https://mma.napubcoonline.com/cgi-bin/mma?a=cl&cl=CL1&sp=TRA&ai=1&e=-------en-20-CRE-1--txt-txIN-creem-------1---

This is brilliant!

NR- Trans Oceanic Trouser Press October 1977

Holy bananas, that was my favorite thing when I was a teen. Still got the whole set in a closet somewhere. Thanks!!!
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 09 Aug 2018, 12:49

echolalia wrote:Image

The looks, styles and products of the world’s first-ever consumer boom (1955-65). It covers architecture, interior design, cars, labour-saving appliances, nuclear fallout shelters etc. It’s fascinating, if you like this kind of thing.

The illustrations are great – some of them amazing. The adverts for the products were often more interesting than the products themselves.

It’s well-written and quite witty in places. You can tell Hines loves his subject deeply, and nothing is too trivial to mention. One innovation of the populuxe period, apparently, was the corrugated potato chip, whose form was borrowed from structural engineering, the idea being to make it stronger and therefore able to scoop up more dip. But that’s an exception – in most instances the look was pure styling, with no practical function. Not that it was empty – it embodied a “fantasy”, usually a positive and optimistic perspective on the future.

The dominant visual motifs were borrowed from jet planes and rockets (most manufacturers of consumer goods were also military contractors). Stuff was curvy yet angular – both acute and obtuse, as exemplified in the “leaning forward” look that appeared in cars in about 1957. Rectangles which were perfectly happy just to sit there became parallelograms, itching to go where they were pointing. The tailfins tend to attract more attention but there was plenty of evolution at the front ends of cars too, such as the introduction of useless conical protuberances synechdochically termed dagmars after the actress of the same name. Some fronts are really beautiful – chrome bumpers that break forward and backward with the voluptuous rhythms of a Borromini façade. But not all designs were successful and one model with a curiously-shaped radiator grille was especially unloved – “like a great gaping minge bearing down on me,” as one English visitor described it.

The ability of a design element to embody meaning sometimes determined its inclusion even at the expense of functionality. He’s quite close to Americana-loving French intellectuals like Barthes and Baudrillard in his semiological approach here. So push buttons became ubiquitous features on household appliances during the period, often when a dial would have done the job better, such as setting the temperature on a washing machine or whatever. Maybe the appeal of buttons lay in their binariness and the way this prefigured the “digital” age. It was a terrible decade for the rheostat, anyway.

I want a formica-topped blob table now!


Great review from you there Echo... I bought this on the back of it and it lives up to all you posted.

A really good overview of the subject (consumerism from 53-65) which, if you have any love of the subject, you really ought to get hold of.
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”
"Don't be seduced into thinking that which did not make a profit is without value"
"'Seize the moments as they fly, know to live and learn to die'."

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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 09 Aug 2018, 17:14

^^^ I'm sold, except the paperback edition is weirdly more expensive than the hardcover. (I prefer the paperback format -it's smaller and lighter.)
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 09 Aug 2018, 21:40

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A book that Jeremy Corbyn AND Boris Johnson can get behind.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 14 Aug 2018, 14:27

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A panoramic, Tom Wolfe/Dickens kind of thing, taking place in NYC 1976/77. I recalled a good review, so I grabbed it at half-price.

I see that one critic called it "the kind of exuberant, Zeitgeisty New York novel, like The Bonfire of the Vanities or The Goldfinch, that you’ll either love, hate, or pretend to have read," while another called it "overhyped" and "a steaming pile of literary dung." LOL

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_on_F ... berg_novel)
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 14 Aug 2018, 14:35

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Deeper and deeper into the rabbit hole … :?
“It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.” Mark Twain

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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 28 Aug 2018, 13:29

Diamond Dog wrote:A few of you on here may be interested in this crowdfunded book, entitled "A Guide To Modernism In Metro-Land" by Joshua Abbott.
It's halfway to being fully funded so please take a look and sign up if you fancy a copy of the book.

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Modernism in Metro-Land started as a website in 2011 and has grown to explore modernist buildings throughout suburban London. Inspired by John Betjeman’s Metro-Land (1973) television programme and the architectural books by Ian Nairn, the website examines the growth of the suburbs from the 1920s to the present day through its modernist designs. Featuring architects such as Charles Holden, Erno Goldfinger and Norman Foster, Modernism in Metro-Land also shows the development of modernist architecture in Britain from its introduction in the 1920s right up to the brink of the 21st century. As well as the website, Modernism in Metro-Land also hosts tours of the modernist stations of the Piccadilly and Central Lines, as well as being a fixture of the annual Open House London weekend with its Stanmore Art Deco house walking tour.

And, no, I'm not on commission.


I'm still not, but it's only 71% funded and I want my copy!

So.... take a look and see if it's something you'd be interested in.

I'd think John Coan and maybe The Modernist would be interested in it.
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”
"Don't be seduced into thinking that which did not make a profit is without value"
"'Seize the moments as they fly, know to live and learn to die'."

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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 28 Aug 2018, 19:59

Image

For an airport novel, this is a bit of a doorstop at well over 600 pages long. So far, it's rollicking away at quite a pace, but it's not convincing me that it wants to be anything but a miniseries on Sky Atlantic or somefink.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Deebank » 28 Aug 2018, 20:15

Darkness_Fish wrote:Image

For an airport novel, this is a bit of a doorstop at well over 600 pages long. So far, it's rollicking away at quite a pace, but it's not convincing me that it wants to be anything but a miniseries on Sky Atlantic or somefink.



Isn’t A G Riddle Lord Voldemort’s real name?
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 28 Aug 2018, 20:20

:-D

Before he got ideas above his station. I reckon A. G. Riddle also batted at 4 for Slytherin, and had quite a handy off-break.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 04 Sep 2018, 13:26

Image
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby harvey k-tel » 04 Sep 2018, 18:37

Hey lawdy mama, that's a good book!
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