Other people's misconceptions about your kind of music.

Backslapping time. Well done us. We are fantastic.
User avatar
Ray K.
Posts: 5556
Joined: 17 Jul 2003, 21:06
Location: Philadelphia PA

Postby Ray K. » 11 Jun 2004, 14:32

Older friends who I don't see very often still assume I'm on my metal kick from the early 80's.

User avatar
catboy
Posts: 1118
Joined: 11 Jun 2004, 13:27

Postby catboy » 11 Jun 2004, 14:41

Have to say, the Greatful Dead have no tunes or songs


no...never heard of them..now The Grateful Dead now theres a band...mmmmm!!

User avatar
bhoywonder
The Magnificent
Posts: 27391
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 19:06
Location: Bristol, UK
Contact:

Postby bhoywonder » 11 Jun 2004, 14:47

catboy wrote:
Have to say, the Greatful Dead have no tunes or songs


no...never heard of them..now The Grateful Dead now theres a band...mmmmm!!


yes, well, there was some guinness at lunchtime...

User avatar
catboy
Posts: 1118
Joined: 11 Jun 2004, 13:27

Postby catboy » 11 Jun 2004, 14:50

as it should be!.....

suggestions for a new post...what are we drinking later???....or did we do that already...sorry new here....

Reeecheee
Posts: 149
Joined: 20 Nov 2003, 17:44
Contact:

Postby Reeecheee » 11 Jun 2004, 18:35

My friends call me the goth and think i'm into heavy metal and goth rock when the heaviest thing i listen to is Tool or RATM. Apart from that its mainly indie or dance.

All because i went through a nu metal phase a few when i was 15-17.
If at first you don't succeed, remove all evidence you ever tried.

User avatar
The Write Profile
2017 BCB Cup Champ
Posts: 14613
Joined: 15 Sep 2003, 10:55
Location: Today, Tomorrow, Timaru
Contact:

Postby The Write Profile » 07 Sep 2004, 00:29

Bumping this thread for one last time, because I kind of like it...

One last question I have to ask regarding it though..at what point did most of you realise that you'd start getting into "all kinds" of music--i.e. you wouldn't be the one album a year type person.

I have a frightening suspicion that in another life I could have easily been that sort of person, and I'm trying to figure out at what point I moved the other way. It's not as if my parents actively encouraged me either way, aside from the fact that they were very much into the contemporary music of their time a couple of decades previously.



What "saved" us?

Or not, as the case may be, we could be far (financially) richer as a result if we didn't like music. Whether we'd have decent taste is a another matter entirely
It's before my time but I've been told, he never came back from Karangahape Road.

User avatar
beenieman
Posts: 15400
Joined: 20 Jul 2003, 21:43

Postby beenieman » 07 Sep 2004, 00:32

The Right Scarfie Profile wrote:Bumping this thread for one last time, because I kind of like it...

One last question I have to ask regarding it though..at what point did most of you realise that you'd start getting into "all kinds" of music--i.e. you wouldn't be the one album a year type person.

I have a frightening suspicion that in another life I could have easily been that sort of person, and I'm trying to figure out at what point I moved the other way. It's not as if my parents actively encouraged me either way, aside from the fact that they were very much into the contemporary music of their time a couple of decades previously.



What "saved" us?

Or not, as the case may be, we could be far (financially) richer as a result if we didn't like music. Whether we'd have decent taste is a another matter entirely


I've been gathering/collecting/listening to music since I was at least 8-9 years old. there's no doubt I'd have more money if i didn't but that's not the point is it?

Most people to look at me would not expect me to have such a large number of reggae records.

User avatar
Magilla
Otago Mago
Posts: 15081
Joined: 19 Jul 2003, 04:02
Location: Gazing at the harbour.
Contact:

Postby Magilla » 07 Sep 2004, 00:42

The Right Scarfie Profile wrote:...at what point did most of you realise that you'd start getting into "all kinds" of music--i.e. you wouldn't be the one album a year type person.

...we could be far (financially) richer as a result if we didn't like music. Whether we'd have decent taste is a another matter entirely


I first started buying albums in about '81, aged 13, and would buy a new one every few months. I'm not sure when I actually realised this as such, it just got going and probably never stop.

As for "all kinds" of music, not until I was in my mid-twenties, prior to that it was noisy guitar stuff or not at all.
Yes, I may have been financially better off, but who knows? But with regard to the wealth vs taste thing, it is interesting how many wealthy people do tend to be into "music for people that don't like music". (Though I'm sure there are wealthy people with good musical taste).

As an example of this, a good mate of mine is pretty well of, owns a really flash house, etc. He really likes VU, Beefheart, Zappa, Beach Boys, etc, stuff us music snobs also like.
He and his wife have a typical, average stereo system.
However, this friend of his wife's, she's got a huge, flash stereo system, speakers worth NZ$8000 all the bells and whistles, etc. and the sort of bands she plays: The Eagles. :cry:
"U2 routinely spent a year in the studio...I have a theory: if you put four monkeys in the studio for a year with Lanois and Eno and Lillywhite, they would make a pretty good record, too."

User avatar
Snowdog
Real Doyen
Posts: 14491
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 09:36
Location: Sitting at the back, looking cool but feeling all alone.
Contact:

Postby Snowdog » 07 Sep 2004, 01:01

bhoywonder wrote:Interesting question... Blah, blah, blah... There's nothing wrong with liking shit, we all have little self-indulgences, but, to me anyway, you have to know it's shit. Otherwise you've lost.


I won't quote the whole thing, but I thought it was an excellent post.

The thing that troubles me is that when one does have a context, in my case several thousand albums across many many genres, & one still really rates music that so many trusted & respected friends think is shite, it does leave one scratching one's head somewhat.
"Elements of the past & future, combining to make something not quite as good as either."

User avatar
Snowdog
Real Doyen
Posts: 14491
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 09:36
Location: Sitting at the back, looking cool but feeling all alone.
Contact:

Postby Snowdog » 07 Sep 2004, 01:04

Jeff K wrote:
cheepniz wrote:My dad often sends me things like Ambient Sounds from Nature, and so I put it on, and listen to trees breathe, crickets chirp, and frogs eat their own legs off.

I don't have the heart to tell him.


Sounds great! *cough*


And me. Cough.
"Elements of the past & future, combining to make something not quite as good as either."

User avatar
Snowdog
Real Doyen
Posts: 14491
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 09:36
Location: Sitting at the back, looking cool but feeling all alone.
Contact:

Postby Snowdog » 07 Sep 2004, 01:06

fear_satan wrote:Well.... One of my flatmates constantly refers to anything I listen to with some fuzzy guitar as "church-burning" music.


You can picture the scene...

A howling mob, baying for blood, each one with a flaming torch...

Except for the guy carrying the portable stereo.
"Elements of the past & future, combining to make something not quite as good as either."

User avatar
Snowdog
Real Doyen
Posts: 14491
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 09:36
Location: Sitting at the back, looking cool but feeling all alone.
Contact:

Postby Snowdog » 07 Sep 2004, 01:09

bhoywonder wrote:B&S are nothing. They are valueless. Bowie made a few great records, things like Ziggy Stardust and Hunky Dory are among the best 3 or 4 hundred records of the early 70s. But he never had anything like consistency. He made, maybe, 5 good albums and then 30 very average to completely awful ones. He's OK, just phenomenally over-rated, is all.




I'll never get used to opinion stated as fact though.




*imagines beaming grin barely visible through smoke from A-team cigar*
"Elements of the past & future, combining to make something not quite as good as either."

User avatar
beenieman
Posts: 15400
Joined: 20 Jul 2003, 21:43

Postby beenieman » 07 Sep 2004, 01:13

Magilla wrote:
The Right Scarfie Profile wrote:...at what point did most of you realise that you'd start getting into "all kinds" of music--i.e. you wouldn't be the one album a year type person.

...we could be far (financially) richer as a result if we didn't like music. Whether we'd have decent taste is a another matter entirely


I first started buying albums in about '81, aged 13, and would buy a new one every few months. I'm not sure when I actually realised this as such, it just got going and probably never stop.

As for "all kinds" of music, not until I was in my mid-twenties, prior to that it was noisy guitar stuff or not at all.
Yes, I may have been financially better off, but who knows? But with regard to the wealth vs taste thing, it is interesting how many wealthy people do tend to be into "music for people that don't like music". (Though I'm sure there are wealthy people with good musical taste).

As an example of this, a good mate of mine is pretty well of, owns a really flash house, etc. He really likes VU, Beefheart, Zappa, Beach Boys, etc, stuff us music snobs also like.
He and his wife have a typical, average stereo system.
However, this friend of his wife's, she's got a huge, flash stereo system, speakers worth NZ$8000 all the bells and whistles, etc. and the sort of bands she plays: The Eagles. :cry:


I like the Eagles. And Beach Boys & VU.

I don't like Beefheart or Zappa.

Don't judge me :roll:

Guest

Postby Guest » 07 Sep 2004, 01:14

beenieman wrote:I like the Eagles. And Beach Boys & VU.

I don't like Beefheart or Zappa.

Don't judge me :roll:


Oh don't worry, we won't bother about that.

Just straight to the gallows.....

User avatar
Still Baron
Diamond Geezer
Posts: 42078
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 05:38
Location: Impregnable Citadel of Technicality

Postby Still Baron » 07 Sep 2004, 01:33

The main misconception I have to deal with is people who will think I want to go somewhere or do something because live music will be involved. "C'mon, it'll be great, there's a funk band playing!" It's an epidemic where I live. Austin* has done such a good job of claiming to be the "live music capital of the world" that people assume it's a good thing to have live music. I used to live in a small, fun, college town. A great new scummy little bar opened up and quickly ruined itself by insisting on having "Live Music 365 Days A Year" as some sort of calling card. When there's a good band there, it's a great time, but the majority of the time it's a shitty bar because there's a shitty band playing. That's enough of that.


*I don't live in Austin but I'm there a lot. Thankfully, this isn't such a problem there.
take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.

User avatar
The Write Profile
2017 BCB Cup Champ
Posts: 14613
Joined: 15 Sep 2003, 10:55
Location: Today, Tomorrow, Timaru
Contact:

Postby The Write Profile » 07 Sep 2004, 06:10

Magilla wrote:
..

I first started buying albums in about '81, aged 13, and would buy a new one every few months. I'm not sure when I actually realised this as such, it just got going and probably never stop.

:


I think I must have started buying frequently about the age of about 13 or 14. As odd as it sounds, attending musicals, concertos and opera (read: being dragged along by parents who couldn't be bothered paying for a baby sitter that night) when I was an even smaller lad than I am now probably got me started early.
It's not the sort of thing I listen to now, but in an odd sort of way it got me into paying attention to the music. I think that's crucial
It's before my time but I've been told, he never came back from Karangahape Road.

User avatar
Happy Little Elf
Posts: 1398
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 00:53
Location: sunnyside of the street
Contact:

Postby Happy Little Elf » 07 Sep 2004, 07:59

The Right Scarfie Profile wrote:
Magilla wrote:
..

I first started buying albums in about '81, aged 13, and would buy a new one every few months. I'm not sure when I actually realised this as such, it just got going and probably never stop.

:


I think I must have started buying frequently about the age of about 13 or 14. As odd as it sounds, attending musicals, concertos and opera (read: being dragged along by parents who couldn't be bothered paying for a baby sitter that night) when I was an even smaller lad than I am now probably got me started early.
It's not the sort of thing I listen to now, but in an odd sort of way it got me into paying attention to the music. I think that's crucial


My parents were into Tirolean folk music and polka. I guess this could have been a motivation for my interest in exploring other genres of music. Also i've played the piano since i was 4 (which might be part of the reason for my appreciation of tori amos).

Having few friends and no girlfriends growing up also did wonders for my interest in music and books. In my defense though, i'm unattractive and not too bright.
(\_/)<*}}}><
(O.o)
(")(")

User avatar
beenieman
Posts: 15400
Joined: 20 Jul 2003, 21:43

Re:

Postby beenieman » 26 Apr 2013, 02:32

Doobie Baron wrote:The main misconception I have to deal with is people who will think I want to go somewhere or do something because live music will be involved. "C'mon, it'll be great, there's a funk band playing!" It's an epidemic where I live. Austin* has done such a good job of claiming to be the "live music capital of the world" that people assume it's a good thing to have live music. I used to live in a small, fun, college town. A great new scummy little bar opened up and quickly ruined itself by insisting on having "Live Music 365 Days A Year" as some sort of calling card. When there's a good band there, it's a great time, but the majority of the time it's a shitty bar because there's a shitty band playing. That's enough of that.


*I don't live in Austin but I'm there a lot. Thankfully, this isn't such a problem there.

I've never been a big man of going to see music live. I appreciate we need live music for the system to work but I've always enjoyed listening in my own environment.
One night, an evil spirit held me down
I could not make one single sound
Jah told me, 'Son, use the word'
And now I'm as free as a bird