The Jazz Workshop

Backslapping time. Well done us. We are fantastic.
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T. Willy Rye
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby T. Willy Rye » 13 Mar 2011, 21:55

I don't have that one SS, but I'm playing When Farmer Met Gryce. I don't have much Gryce, I need to delve more thoroughly into his work, but Farmer definitely deserves more love. His work is so consistently good and the groups he assembles around him are loaded with talent.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 13 Mar 2011, 23:23

That's probably the most famous of the collaborations with Gryce and for good reason. I have a lot of Farmer on lp and cd and none of it is bad. From his hardbop days to his kinder/gentler twilight years he was always a tasty player in my book. It took me a while to appreciate his mellower side but I finally got it.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 18 Mar 2011, 19:39

I got a nice little package from Music Matters today.

Sam Rivers - Fuschia Swing Song
Paul Chambers - Paul Chambers Quintet

The Chambers lp is my favorite of his Blue Note albums. The first time I heard it was at a guy's house who has an amazing sound system and he played his original pressing of the album. I went out shortly after that and bought the album on cd which is ok but I've always wanted a nice vinyl copy of this album. The Sam Rivers album is another great choice by Music Matters for the fans of the more outside BN recordings. Even though their choices lean too heavily on Lee Morgan and Hank Mobley at the moment, I'm glad they are reissuing some of the less common albums in the label's discography.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Nolamike » 18 Mar 2011, 19:52

Picked up a vinyl reissue of this:

Image

and gave it a spin the other night. Good stuff! Yeah, he did the whole playing three horns at once thing, but man, Kirk was anything but a gimmick. Great album.
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 20 Mar 2011, 19:02

Nolamike wrote:Picked up a vinyl reissue of this:

Image

and gave it a spin the other night. Good stuff! Yeah, he did the whole playing three horns at once thing, but man, Kirk was anything but a gimmick. Great album.


Agreed. I think that was the first album I bought by RRK. Have you read his bio, Bright Moments? It has some amazing stories in it and definitely worth picking it up.

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Balboa
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Balboa » 20 Mar 2011, 19:06

I've got a bunch of Roland Kirk stuff that I keep meaning to dig deeper into - I love what I have heard but haven't found the time to actually listen to some more of his stuff.
Of course, I was mostly stoned at the time.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby fange » 21 Mar 2011, 00:40

Six String wrote:I got a nice little package from Music Matters today.

Sam Rivers - Fuschia Swing Song
Paul Chambers - Paul Chambers Quintet

The Chambers lp is my favorite of his Blue Note albums. The first time I heard it was at a guy's house who has an amazing sound system and he played his original pressing of the album. I went out shortly after that and bought the album on cd which is ok but I've always wanted a nice vinyl copy of this album. The Sam Rivers album is another great choice by Music Matters for the fans of the more outside BN recordings. Even though their choices lean too heavily on Lee Morgan and Hank Mobley at the moment, I'm glad they are reissuing some of the less common albums in the label's discography.


Some lovely albums there, SS. I was just playing some Sam Rivers on Sat. myself, the Dimensions & Extensions album, just great. He had a very robust way of mixing the avant with the more traditional, and it invariably came out as a delicious and satisfying 60s jazz hot-pot.

Nolamike wrote: Yeah, he did the whole playing three horns at once thing, but man, Kirk was anything but a gimmick. Great album.


Nope, never sounded gimmicky to me either. Everything i've heard him play sounded as though it was serving a musical aim, and the man had the talent and vision to make it work at the highest level (though the stritch thing can get a little raw on the ears sometimes after long listens). His album The Inflated Tear is one of my favourite records of all time - as creative and beautiful an album as you'd ever wish to hear.
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Nolamike » 21 Mar 2011, 14:13

Balboa wrote:I've got a bunch of Roland Kirk stuff that I keep meaning to dig deeper into - I love what I have heard but haven't found the time to actually listen to some more of his stuff.


Yeah, this was only my second Kirk album. I also have this:

Image

which I picked up after seeing video footage of the show. Fantastic.
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby hookfinger » 21 Mar 2011, 16:57

Fangedango! wrote:. His album The Inflated Tear is one of my favorite records of all time - as creative and beautiful an album as you'd ever wish to hear.


Indubitably.
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Balboa » 21 Mar 2011, 18:48

Image

I've had this on in the car today - and with the sun coming out for a little while it was perfect. It leans towards jazz rock, but is funky and has a sountracky feel to it at times - recommended.

Harold McNair - Sax, Flute, Electric Sax
Rick Grech - Bass Guitar
Keith Tippett - Piano
Colin Green - Guitar
Alan Branscombe - Piano
Terry Cox - Drums
Danny Thompson - String Bass
Tony Carr - Percussion
Of course, I was mostly stoned at the time.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Balboa » 22 Mar 2011, 20:02

Last year I bought a few of those Black Saint/Soul Note collections that came out - they covered a variety of artists and contained 6 or 7 albums of theirs in slipcases at a pretty great price. I picked up the Bill Dixon one, the George Russell and the Henry Threadgill. I just haven't had time to listen to them as much as I would like, but what I have heard has been really, really good - challenging music on the whole, but rewarding and deep. I should pick up a few of the other sets before these all start going oop or something.

Today I cracked open the Henry Threadgill set - I was excited about it because he was being likened to Anthony Braxton and he was also part of that whole late 60s/early 70s Chicago scene. First up was this:

Image

Pretty free stuff, but not in a skronky kinda way - thoughtful and lots of space between the players. It is a trio setting with Threadgill playing flute (this is fantastic - he plays in a really Eastern style [I am sure there is a term for it!]), as well as tenor sax, and he is joined by Steve McCall on drums and Fred Hopkins on bass. Recorded live at 2 different date (one of them in Sam Rivers' NYC loft in '76), they really go out there and it feels like total improvisation, but I can imagine them all focusing on each others' playing. The NYC stuff is really incredible - almost not there at times. Do you know who I was reminded of? Supersilent! I'm not sure how well known they are round here (Specbebop is a fan), but there is that same kinda percussive element to the improvisation, and the same use of space.

Then I listened to this:

Image

Which was different, but equally as good. It felt a little more structured than the earlier set (and comes from late '80), but the trio was the same and the playing was equally as great. Still pretty free at times, but again it doesn't get too skronky at any point. Threadgill composes everything, and you can hear him playing with the riffs and turning them inside out whilst the band do the same (the opening few minutes of the track 'CT, JL' are brilliant - the band just take that riff and run with it, each interpretating it their own way).

Anyway, looking forward to hearing more of this set - any other fans of Henry Threadgill or Air round here? This might even lure Pig Bodine out of retirement!
Of course, I was mostly stoned at the time.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby hookfinger » 22 Mar 2011, 20:23

Big fan of most Threadgill, even the more accessible work such as You Know The Number. Nolamike will soon be the recipient of Air Lore and a few others so hopefully he will be a new fan.

That Bill Dixon set is dense, but worth your time.
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Balboa » 24 Mar 2011, 18:38

hookfinger wrote:Big fan of most Threadgill, even the more accessible work such as You Know The Number. Nolamike will soon be the recipient of Air Lore and a few others so hopefully he will be a new fan.

That Bill Dixon set is dense, but worth your time.


Yeah, I listened to a little of the Dixon set when I got it and it was, well, 'dense' is absolutely the word for it. I need to settle down one night and give it a good listen.

I carried on with the Threadgill stuff and listened to this a couple of times today..

Image

and again, I really enjoyed it. Recorded in 1990, 2 guitars, 2 tubas, trombone, drums and Threadgill (there is an odd line up if ever I saw one!) - less free than the earlier Air stuff, but equally as great. I'm really enjoying hearing the band and Threadgill himself take his opening lines and just twist them inside out and back again. Great stuff.

And all this talk of Roland Kirk made me reach for this;

Image

Its an interesting set for sure, and a great band - Lonnie Liston Smith, Grady Tate, Ronald Boykins - and recorded in April '67; it sounds like it, it has some great soul jazz sounds on it, and the playing is pretty safe (but good!). A couple of modal sounding tracks give the whole thing an edge (including the title track itself) - I'll dig into a few of his others over the weekend.
Of course, I was mostly stoned at the time.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 31 Mar 2011, 21:46

Yesterday I picked up a reissue from LIght in the Attic by Gabor Szabo (Jazz Raga). It was originally on Impulse and the label did a pretty nice job on the cover aesthetics as well as the vinyl. Don't know if it's from the orig. master tapes or anything but it sounds good to my ears. I've really been drawn into Gabor Szabo's world in the last ten years. His playing was so interestingly understated and singular and he had a pretty impressive run for a few years. When you factor in his work with Chico Hamilton and/or Charles Lloyd you have quite an impressive list of albums.

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T. Willy Rye
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby T. Willy Rye » 05 Apr 2011, 20:43

Five days since you guys last posted and one week went by before then. If I don't start seeing more regular posts I'm going to turn this into a Blue Note juke box. To show I mean business:


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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Spec » 05 Apr 2011, 20:55

listening to this today. It is one of my favourites and has had mentions on here before. But today for some reason it sounded better than ever.

Image

Highlight: the second half of You And The Night And The Music / Extension and Song Is You

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 06 Apr 2011, 17:15

Spec wrote:listening to this today. It is one of my favourites and has had mentions on here before. But today for some reason it sounded better than ever.

Image

Highlight: the second half of You And The Night And The Music / Extension and Song Is You


It's hard to beat a live recording from that trio. One of the best bands of the genre.

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 06 Apr 2011, 22:57

FYI for those who don't know this site. It's got a lot of interviews with jazz musicians and other people associated with the music.

http://www.jazzwax.com/

Check it out.

Do we need to got to create a pt.2 thread ala What Are You Playing Now?

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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Snarfyguy » 06 Apr 2011, 23:07

Six String wrote:Do we need to got to create a pt.2 thread ala What Are You Playing Now?


This makes 1600 posts. Well done, all. :)

Can we get a moderator to put this one somewhere it won't get purged? There are a lot of recommendations on this one and I'd like to have it preserved for future perusal.
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Re: The Jazz Workshop

Postby Six String » 06 Apr 2011, 23:20

Snarfyguy wrote:
Six String wrote:Do we need to got to create a pt.2 thread ala What Are You Playing Now?


This makes 1600 posts. Well done, all. :)

Can we get a moderator to put this one somewhere it won't get purged? There are a lot of recommendations on this one and I'd like to have it preserved for future perusal.


Is it better to split it up or is it ok to just keep it going so it doesn't get lost, even accidently?