Share your Musical Life Story

Backslapping time. Well done us. We are fantastic.
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frimleygreener
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Postby frimleygreener » 23 Mar 2007, 10:40

born in 1952. everything was in black and white back then.dad was an aircraft engineer,mum looked after us and worked part time in the corner co-op.we had that radio that george ivan morrison sang about in "the days before rock n'roll"..i remember the orange glow of the mullard valves and the delivery in halting tones via the ether of the exploits of my beloved 'spurs in europe....cut to the chase....we land in accra,ghana...from the grey west london suburbs that seemed to consist of men in mufflers in flat caps regardless of the weather,and no discernable gap between childhood and adulthood regardless of gender, to graceful girls in their kenti cloth,sashaying down the street with baskets of fruit balanced on their heads:to eddie and the messengers at the ambassador hotel with their "highlife" credo..and then back to england...and the first "record" that made its indelible mark on my psyche?..."house of the rising sun".. the animals....it came from nowhere and never went away....then it was the pirate radio stations...the who,the small faces,the beatles and stones of course....then jimi happened and blew everything apart...the discs were no longer enough..i needed to see that cataclysmic meld of raw power and tenderness in the flesh and did:at the royal albert hall.i was away.on the train(not out of my brain) every weekend for all nighters...edgar broughton...family...caravan, soft machine ....the nice,egg,blossom toes...and d.j mr dexter..and then some "rehearsal room hosting" for the nascent hawkwind,deviants/faries guys in floral street basements...and now?..best part of 40 years on?..i loved every bloody second of it.

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Copehead
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Postby Copehead » 23 Mar 2007, 10:46

Childhood: Trad jazz, Beatles, Simon and Garfunkle

For me it went:

Glam,Football, Punk, New wave/post punk, heavy metal, rediscover 60s/bitofprog, C86, Rap, C86, Rave/Madchester, C86, C86, Britpop, C86, C86, present day.

Albums I was bought for Xmas went something like Gary Glitters greatest hits, Tonic for the troops, Great Rock n Roll swindle, If you want blood.
Last edited by Copehead on 23 Mar 2007, 13:40, edited 1 time in total.
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king feeb
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Postby king feeb » 23 Mar 2007, 11:57

Davey owes me a warm Corona with a hair in it.

One important thing I forgot to mention (and was reminded of by Kath) was the infliuence of Creem magazine on me and my friends when I was in my early teens. There wasn't any internet or MTV, so in a dinky WVa town, that was our source of information and new bands. Of course we were still "buying blind" since there was no way to actually hear The Stooges or The Velvets or any of the other many bands I discovered via Creem. But they were a lifesaver for young, isolated music fans like me.

Also, Creem was the first magazine that had sarcastic and disrespectful photo captions, another source of appeal. A favorite I still remember: a photo of Keef with a very chubby Anita Pallenberg had the caption "A proud Anita Pallenberg smiles as her new belt is unfurled from the 33rd floor".
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kath
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Postby kath » 23 Mar 2007, 12:45

a few things...

1. davey owes me a beer. my fave brand: jack n coke.

2. i love this thread. i really, truly love this thread. maybe many of the folk who reside primarily in nextdoorland should post in it, too. everyone should. whoever's got the bacon avatar said it already. it should be a requirement.

and

3. why do i keep craving bacon?

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brotherlouie
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Postby brotherlouie » 23 Mar 2007, 13:52

Slade :lol:
ABBA :roll:
Genesis :wink:
Heavy Metal :twisted:
Marillion :oops:
Violent Femmes - Smiths - Led Zeppelin - A Blue Note Compilation - The Cocteaus - Neil young (art school, dig it)
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Jeff K
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Postby Jeff K » 23 Mar 2007, 14:53

I think this thread is all the proof you need that we aren't the average, normal music fan. It's amazing how we remember every little thing that was significant to our lives when it pertains to music. Stuff that might seem irrelevant to someone else was a big deal for us. After reading through these wonderfully written testimonials it's not surprising we all ended up on a board like BCB.

Keep 'em coming!
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Davey the Fat Boy
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Postby Davey the Fat Boy » 23 Mar 2007, 15:35

Sneelock wrote:I read it twice. do I get two beers?
that was pretty great reading, davey.
good luck with that!

"blue blue morning" like the Randy Newman song?


I'd buy you a whole six-pack Sneelock.

Actually the band was the named before the Randy Newman song, but given what a huge fan I was, it would have made sense.
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Davey the Fat Boy
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Postby Davey the Fat Boy » 23 Mar 2007, 16:16

toomanyhatz wrote:You are a good man, I love you and please make mine a Red Hook.

I'm glad you remember KHJ. It was a good breeding ground for eclecticism. Amazing what disparate things were hits in our lifetime, huh? Those of you who might hold current pop music in close to the same league with the pop music of old should check out a KHJ playlist from '73 or '74. My "roots" if you will are from that period- Elton, Stevie Wonder, The O'Jays and the Philadelphia sound, those Charlie Rich singles- that's what I grew up on.

The thing I remember most about that '91 tour is how we kept noticing that the "scene" was absolutely identical in every town or city regardless of the size of it. We met some nice people, though, and had some adventures. In case anyone's wondering why we seem to know each other so well. Though if either of us harbored any illusions that those particular streets were paved with gold, we sure didn't come back with them.

I didn't know about the fate of those master tapes before. I'm glad you're thinking of recording, though. Hey, I hear BCB is covering the White Album...


Red Hook it is. And you know I love you back my friend.

I never knew we were both KHJ kids. Funny that comes out now after all this time. I bet it has a lot to do with our common musical vocabulary. A couple of other LA radio influences that bear mentioning were KTNQ (The New Ten Q) which was even more eclectic then KHJ (picking up on protopunk and mixing it into a top 40 bubblegum context), and KNX FM the first adult alternative format in the country according to legend. They leaned a little to heavy of the California sound for some (playing healthy doses of Dan Fogelberg and his ilk), but they were also the only place you'd hear guys like McGuinn, Clark and Hillman, plus they introduced me to Randy Newman and Harry Nilsson. They'd also mix in things like The Korgis, Gram Parsons, and Van Morrison.

The thing I remember most about that '91 tour is how we kept noticing that the "scene" was absolutely identical in every town or city regardless of the size of it. We met some nice people, though, and had some adventures. In case anyone's wondering why we seem to know each other so well. Though if either of us harbored any illusions that those particular streets were paved with gold, we sure didn't come back with them.


Yeah - that's certainly how I recall it as well. If I'm honest I'd have to admit that my career started to end right there. I just didn't love it. Not hanging out with you, which was the fun part (other than the Irish music quotient :x ) - but driving around the country trying to convince kids at colege radio stations that I was as cool as King Missile or The Butthole Surfers. It just got old fast.

I didn't know about the fate of those master tapes before. I'm glad you're thinking of recording, though. Hey, I hear BCB is covering the White Album...


Well the master tapes seemed like a minor issue at the time given the enormity of the situation. I didn't really bring it up much then. It seemed petty.

As for the White Album, I don't have any recording equipment here. But like I said, if they do Loveless I'll book a studio. :D

P.S. Beer for all. Thanks everybody. I'm enjoying reading all of yours as well.
Last edited by Davey the Fat Boy on 23 Mar 2007, 16:21, edited 1 time in total.
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Matt Wilson
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Postby Matt Wilson » 23 Mar 2007, 16:20

Born in '65 in Houston, Texas. Both my parents and all my relatives were born and raised in the South. I was a military brat (Navy) and we moved all the time. I've lived all over the place and even in different countries but from 1972 on every place has been in California so I consider myself a Californian now (although not your typical one).
I really don't remember any musical epiphany in my youth, I think I always loved music. My parents had a few rock albums in their collection but this seemed to have little impact on me--I've mostly got into bands through reading about them or because everyone else in the '70s seemed to like them. I was buying critics' lists as far back as the late '70s when I was about 12 or 13. I distinctly recall Paul Gambaccini's Top 200 book from around '77-'78 and how I wanted to own every one of them. I've still got a copy.
When I was a little kid in the early '70s I loved The Osmonds--even seeing them in concert (my first). The first rock band I was passionate about was KISS (we all were), but when I moved onto Led Zeppelin at around 1977 I never looked back. There were many other Zep fanatics in those days so I certainly wasn't unique. But even back then I was the one who was the MOST into it. Yeah, a lot of people had albums but if I was into a band I had ALL their LPs PLUS a book or two about them. I was also the guy into the '60s when all my friends were busy enjoying the '70s.

By the end of the '70s I had been through major Doors, Stones, Who, & Hendrix phases as well--what we now call "classic rock." Punk completely passed my generation by. We were too young for it and England and New York were a million miles away. They didn't play that stuff on the radio and none of my friends were into that kind of music either. We mostly looked like the kind of little brats in the Over the Edge film, or maybe Fast Times at Ridgemont High (about a school in San Diego).
In 1980 my Dad was stationed in Stockton, CA. A little podunk town a couple of hours from San Francisco and an hour South of Sacramento. While there I got into Bay Area bands in a big way. CCR, Santana, The Dead, etc. Even thouth I lived there none of my friends were really into this kind of music--I had to turn them on to these bands. When I moved back to San Diego in 1982 I finally started to buy punk albums. Suddenly THAT was my passion and I did a 180 and virtually never listened to classic rock for the next few years. In college the '80s underground music scene was big and every party I went to played all the typical bands of the time: The Smiths, Cure, New Order, REM, U2, etc. By the time I graduated in '88 I was completely immersed in the '80s punk/post punk/new wave thing but was also starting to get into African American music like Stax/Volt & Atlantic. By that time I saw myself as a rock historian, if you will, and I still knew of no one like me. I was alone in my tree. I had lived in my fraternity (my parents had moved to Hawaii with my sisters) with hundreds of CDs (some of which were stolen, of course) and shelves of music books. I'm sure a few people thought of me as weird but everyone wanted to borrow my albums so what the fuck...

Anyway, when I graduated and got away from the collegiate influence (and my peers) I gravitated back to older music. Remastered, reissued CDs became my thing but I still listened to modern rock as well. I loved the grunge era, for instance, and the Britpop one too. By 30 (in 1995) I thought I had a pretty good handle on old AND new music and when I moved up here to LA I still felt tied to the then-current music scene.

So here I am twelve years later and I have almost no interest in modern music but I have met many people like me through the internet. I have never regretted not trying to make a career out of music in some way (either as a musician or as a writer). I'm content to just listen to the art that others produce. As I get older I'm somewhat saddened by the fact that our music has been coopted by the establishment to the point that it means nothing but nostalgia for most. As I type this a girl is sitting across from me with a Hendrix T-shirt on. I bet if I asked her to name one Jimi song she wouldn't be able to come up with one. But maybe it's me who should change his opinion. After all--what else could we have expected?

There's many other great artists/bands I love that I didn't mention and I'm not going to now. Needless to say I've been through a phase with nearly every great artist/band in the 'canon' when I listened to practically nothing else for six months or so.

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Postby Billybob Dylan » 23 Mar 2007, 16:23

1963 – 1979
I was born in 1959. Earliest musical memory is my dad playing ‘Please Please Me’ on his open reel tape deck.

My parents had a fairly extensive record collection, but in those days it was almost exclusively classical. My mum was an amateur opera singer, and I can still recall her singing along on Sunday mornings to a John Shirley Quirke record, really belting it out. The only concessions were a couple of jazz albums of my dad’s, and the only one I can recall was by Chris Barber.

The radio was almost my only source of music up to around age 9 or so. I still recall being fascinated with the ‘Penny Lane’/’Strawberry Fields’ single, and always rushing to the wireless and turning it up when it came on. My dad told me I could always go to the record shop and buy the single with my pocket money. I suppose it had never really occurred to me up to that point that I could actually own a copy and listen to it anytime I liked. That may have been a life changing moment.

First album was ‘Electric Warrior’ in 1971, followed by ‘Ziggy Stardust’ and ‘Slayed?’ I can still recall seeing a copy of ‘Slayed?’ hanging in the window of Spinning Disc Records on Chiswick High Road with a price tag of £1.80. This was the golden age of glam which was always more about singles than albums, and that was what I mostly bought. I really don’t have much recollection of the post-glam/pre-punk days (even though looking back it was only a couple of years or so).

I started listening to John Peel on a regular basis in mid-1975 and in early/mid 1976 I started buying the NME and Sounds. I had a great scam going. Back then, the cost of both papers combined was less than 50p. I’d go into WH Smith’s on a Wednesday morning on the way to work, slip a copy of Sounds inside the NME and give the cashier a 50p piece. Then, as I received my change, I nonchalantly looked away, deliberately not checking my change so that if I got caught, I could say I’d given the girl enough money for both papers – it was her fault she didn’t spot the copy of Sounds secreted within the NME. I got away with this for years!

By late ’76, via the pages of the music press, I was finding out about the punk ‘movement’ and searching in vain for a record shop that sold those kinds of records. That was a tough assignment in Cirencester. Fortunately, my mum worked in Cheltenham, so I’d giver her lists of singles I’d heard on Peel’s show and get her to buy them for me.

Living in a backwater like Cirencester in those days turned out to be a blessing in disguise as Swindon was only about half an hour away, and I, and some like-minded friends, discovered that the Affair club had punk bands on every Tuesday night, and the Brunel Rooms had punk bands on every Friday night. Most weeks we had no idea who was playing until we got there, but that wasn’t a problem. We saw many, many bands on their very first tour, some were somewhat shambolic, but there were a few surprises. I do recall The Pop Group completely blowing me away.

XTC, being a local band, played the backroom at the Brunel every Friday night. Bear in mind this was early/mid 1977 and they hadn’t released a record yet. I must have seen them 30 or 40 times in those days, and was chuffed when they finally “made it.”

By October 1977 I’d moved to Cheltenham where punk bands played at the Town Hall on an irregular basis. By early 1978 a regular venue had been established at Whitcombe Lodge, halfway between Cheltenham & Gloucester, with reggae acts every Friday and punk bands every Saturday. I googled "Whitcombe Lodge" for the hell of it and found this Cure tour poster. Brings back a lot of memories. I remember that show on June 2nd.

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The council successfully closed the venue down after a couple of years, and my band, Scream And Scream Again, had the honour of playing the last night of Whitcombe Lodge supporting the UK Subs, with Blurt supporting us!
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Nikki Gradual
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Postby Nikki Gradual » 23 Mar 2007, 16:40

Slow day at work...

Part 1 (birth-18ish)
I was born in 1968 into a non-musical family. Well, that’s not strictly true, my grandmother was a concert pianist (proof that musical talent can skip at least two generations) and my housewife mum used to play Radio 1 through the house all day. Which meant that I was brought up on a diet of Radio 1 early 1970s staples, the Glitter Band and Leo Sayer spring to mind. My Dad had no idea and no interest and I have told the following story many times to illustrate that, but one more outing will do it no harm. In the early-to-mid 1970s he became a suburban radical by buying Audis, something of a leftfield choice back then before this became an A3 infested planet. They were great, too except that the auto boxes were always going wrong and his 100 saloon was a peach. That’s the one that I remember best because it had an 8 track and on that 8 Track dad would endlessly play the one 8 track he owned, the greatest hits of Frank Sinatra. Nice thing, Ol Blue Eyes smiling and pulling off an accomplished mid-distance stare while wearing a black with white striped lightweight golf jacket. It was a Christmas gift from my grandparents, well more precisely a Christmas gift that my mum bought for him on behalf of my grandparents as was the routine. As an aside, many years later when we did dispatch my Gran to buy an album for my brother’s Christmas present, she boldy walked into WHSmith in Windsor and asked for Black Rose by Skinny Elizabeth. True story. Anyway, family days out were such fun, all of us trundling along in the Audi singing along with Frankie: “When this old world starts getting me down, and people are just too much for me to face…” Christ, we knew Dad’s one album off by heart as you would if that is all you ever heard. Pause. Maybe I do my Dad a disservice: he did have another record, a very early pressing of Rock Around The Clock, I distinctly remember my brother and I using it for target practice with our air rifles once the cuddly toys were destroyed. I digress, back to Ol Blue Eyes still warbling away with his multi-toned warm brown soulful voice in my memory: “They say the girls are something else on broadway…” Are you starting to get suspicious about this Sinatra 8 Track. We never did, until years later when it was pointed out that it was in fact a mislabelled copy of The Drifters Greatest Hits. Hey, I was about six, I wasn’t to know. Normally in these circumstances you could rely on an older brother to give you the education that your parents clearly could not provide. But all I remember then was my brother being into Supertramp and singing along to Dreamer in a very gay way. He later progressed to the Now albums and even more gay stuff like Wham! Yup, with hindsight, Wham! Was as butch as his listening habits got. I was in the wilderness. Need more proof. When Dad was successful enough to have a car with a cassette player, it came with a Beatles Collection cassette, all the worst songs naturally, and I remember my Mum declaring that the mop tops were a 1960s boyband who didn’t play their own instruments. It was around the same time that she declared that Hank Marvin and Cliff Richard were lovers. My God, these people were precisely the right age in the 1960s to be there and lap it all up, but instead they chose their own path. I quizzed them once on their 1960s musical experiences and all they could remember was going to see the Honeycombs at a “dinner-dance”. I craved more detail but none was forthcoming. They couldn’t even remember the hit (Have I the Right?) and all Dad could grunt was “girl drummer”. And the final memory to make my point was from much later, it must have been because Trivial Pursuit existed. Just. We lived in the countryside and it was still in the days when a man knocks on your door and tells you that his car has broken down outside, you just let him in and point him to the phone, even if Dad’s not home. So mum did and as this hip young blade, all beardy and flared suits like The History Man breezed through the lounge, I asked my brother the following Triv question: “Who sang Sitting on the Dock of the Bay?” “Otis Redding” said the man as he stack-heeled his way out of the house. “Don’t listen to him,” said mum after he had gone, “I think it was Gilbert O’Sullivan.”
So I was left to discover and then in a few days undiscover my own musical tastes.
First single, when I so young that I needn’t be embarrassed about it, was either Long Haired Lover From Liverpool by Little Jimmy Osmond or Muhammed Ali, Black Superman by Johnny Wakelin and the Kinshasa Band. I still have both. Then came the mighty Quo. Lord knows why but I became a complete Quo head, I could have gone on Mastermind answering questions about them. The first proper LP I bought with my own money was the cassette of Rockin’ all Over the World (Boots, Bracknell Town Centre). Many more followed. Epithany came at big school when I met cool kids. The Quo weren’t cool. Given the early-1980s era I could go one of two ways: burgundy slacks and Duran Duran or leather and rock. I opted for the latter, thank God. I bought a Velvet Underground LP – purely on the basis of the first issue of the History of Rock part-work, the only one I bought – declaring them the greatest rock n roll band ever. I didn’t like it. Too screechy. Which makes it strange that I did like Where’s Captain Kirk by Spizz and Banned from the Pubs by Peter & The Test Tube Babies. And that was my course for the next few years: down, down, deeper and down into the world of hardcore. The Subs, Conflict, Partisans, Outcasts, One Way System, all melded with an ever-growing retro-punk edge as such “relics” as X-Ray Spex, the Pistols and the Buzzcocks crept into the back of the collection as if they had been there the whole time. Wire, on the other hand, really had been there the whole time. Someone, somewhere (Chris Yates’ elder brother I think) played me two tracks even back in my Quo-loving days. One was 12XU, the other was Outdoor Miner. I loved the second, but told him I liked the first. My first proper gig was the UK Subs at the 100 Club. Nothing special in that, but pretty extreme for a 14-year-old who was meant to be staying with his mate Stephen Daniel in Windsor for the night. Instead Steve’s brother John, a peripheral nutter on the early ’80s hardcore scene drove us up to London in his Ford Escort (mk1, two-door, Alan Mann red and gold racing colours). I was blown away. I drank cider. I pogoed behind a tall mohicanned guy with a studded jacket which raked my face throughout and left it bloodied and corrugated at the end. There was no pain, it was the best thing ever. And then John drove us home, though drove is probably a little too genereous a term, he seemed to be asleep most of the way, the car gently lighting up the sky with sparks as it buffeted the M4 armco. That was just the start: many more gigs followed, but the must-see was always the Subs at the 100 Club. It was there that Charlie Harper bought me a pint, and Captain Scarlet (short-lived guitar tosser) wouldn’t let my mate in because he was a skinhead, it was there that I discovered that Naomi Bourne kept her eyes open while she kissed, it was there that I went from gobbing novice to saliva spitting God.
They were happy days (though I was never comfortable with Naomi’s open eyes and she did complain that the gigs were a bit rough, when she lived in Mile bloody End – but called it Poplar – the hypocrite). I was a man of the world, a very grown-up mid-teenager indeed. Oh yes. Except that I wasn’t really, my naivite shining through the time that I was meeting some friends at Victoria station before a gig and they were late, Really late. This was back in the days when the concours was properly dirty – binmen strike-like filth and detritus everywhere and little wooden huts on the station with benches around them, populated by pissed-up tramps whose eye you dared not catch. So I didn’t, I moved to one side and leaned on a pillar looking mean and moody and manly and threatening in my punk garb. Man of the world. Still they didn’t show. Eventually a nice man, a smart man in his 30s (how could people live to be that old?) a suit and everything came over, offered me a stick of Wrigleys and started chatting. If they didn’t turn up I could always crash at his place, he said, got a spare room, he said. What a nice man I thought as my friends piled through the gates swinging bottles of Merrydown Vintage (silver top, gold top was for snobs) and chanting Warhead: “There’s a burning sun, and it sets in the western world…” Regrets? Oh yes. I told them all about the nice people in London, the generous offer of somewhere to crash. I can still hear the laughter. Man of the world. I’m doubly pleased I didn't tell them about the time me and Al Deane got picked up by the cops in one of those small roads of Carnaby Street because they thought we were rent boys. Men of the world.
I think it was at Septics house that I first heard Syd. Actually I embellish: the only decent record I can remember my brother having (sorry Supertramp fans) was Relics by Pink Floyd. The Floyd were massive still and Music For Pleasure made sure Relics was in stack shelves in the weirdest shops (I even saw it in a hardware store), always £1.99, a cheap way into getting your first Pink Floyd LP. Like thousands of others my bro fell for it and got a hell of a shock because it wasn’t exactly The Wall. Reckon he never even played it all the way through. I can’t remember it from when my brother played it though, I remember it from when Septic played it (if indeed it was him, in fact I was sniffing so much aerosol in those days that everything is rather hazy. I’m pretty sure about the rest, but take this entire recollection with a pinch of salt, like a dream sequence or something). Septic was famous, he was in the Guinness Book of Records for having the most piercings in one ear (and he really bloody was too) and was the ace face in Farnham. Years later he would be much more famous for having dated Liz Hurley in her youth. Anyway, somewhere along the lines I heard Relics and fell in love with Syd. Then came the Television Personalities and Swell Maps. Syd first, I am sure of that. Then came more Floyd, and it was as if time sped up and I was hurtling towards all this stuff faster than I could comprehend it. Traffic, Stones, Hendrix, Zep, Fairport Convention, big jumpers with messages about saving whales on them (“extinction is forever”), Glastonbury, dope and a whole new world. It was as if the Doc Martens had never existed. Then Blues, jazz and more, it kept developing, changing and evolving, but always growing. Things went on to the back shelf, but nothing was ever gone forever. I only ever flogged one LP (Nobody’s Heroes – SLF) and I bought that back a few years later. I’ve even still got those Status Quo LPs, Or maybe it wasn’t evolution and growing, maybe it was just my confusion expanding, sprawling itself ever further across the available space in my room and my life. As it continues to do so. But is it any wonder that I have always been musically confused given the musical abuse I suffered as a child? As Frank Sinatra sang: “Saturday night at the movies,?who cares what picture you see, when you're hugging with your baby in last row in the balcony.”
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Deebank
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Postby Deebank » 23 Mar 2007, 16:54

Nikki Gradual wrote: Long Haired Lover From Liverpool by Little Jimmy Osmond or Muhammed Ali


It was definately Little Jimmy Osmond... I hope this helps.
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souphound
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Postby souphound » 27 Mar 2007, 21:18

Just bumping this fabulous thread. It'll sink fast enough later on when I post my own story, don't worry.
Footy wrote:Last week, I discovered that the cordless drill I bought about 5 years ago is, in fact, a cordless screwdiver.

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kath
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Postby kath » 27 Mar 2007, 22:46

souphound wrote:Just bumping this fabulous thread. It'll sink fast enough later on when I post my own story, don't worry.


taptaptaptap...

kath
(glancing at watch, returning to tapping)

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beenieman
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Postby beenieman » 28 Mar 2007, 03:04

If everybody posted this could be a classic thread.

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souphound
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Postby souphound » 28 Mar 2007, 15:24

beenieman wrote:If everybody posted this could be a classic thread.


Most certainly. I love the way some of the posters here can actually write.


I'm on chapter 11 of my tome, shouldn't be too long now.
Footy wrote:Last week, I discovered that the cordless drill I bought about 5 years ago is, in fact, a cordless screwdiver.

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kath
Groovy Queen of the Cosmos
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Joined: 22 Feb 2006, 15:20
Location: bama via new orleans

Postby kath » 28 Mar 2007, 17:43

souphound wrote:
beenieman wrote:If everybody posted this could be a classic thread.


Most certainly. I love the way some of the posters here can actually write.


I'm on chapter 11 of my tome, shouldn't be too long now.


i feel i haven't represented myself all too well, because my entry in this thread was more of a list than anything else. i will hafta work on something better.

not that i mind continually bumping this thread to the top.

cmon, folk who have not responded. this is a great thread. delve into yer musical past. who was the famous writer who once said, "writing is easy. all you do is open a vein and bleed"...?

ok, so maybe that quote isn't the best advertisement.

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Cosmic American Girl
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Joined: 27 Jan 2007, 02:15
Location: second star to the right

Postby Cosmic American Girl » 28 Mar 2007, 19:44

I was born the year Barbie got a boyfriend and Breakfast At Tiffany's came out, 1961. Ouch.....
My first musical memories were of playing my parent's 45's, in particular, I Got You Babe, Love Potion #9 and Little Red Riding Hood. On TV there was Ed Sullivan, The Monkees, and Sonny And Cher.
I can relate most of my memories in life to music. My first album, a gift from my cool uncle, Slayed?, first one I bought, Beatles blue. My first poster, Peter Frampton, the only one I still have, that big White Album one and the 8x10's. By Jr High I was totally into the Beatles, when they were not at all popular and was convinced I would someday marry George. It was at this time I started collecting as above mention uncle started giving me more, and I still have a few of them.
First kiss- Locomotion-Grand Funk
First serious make out session-Saturday Night
Lost virginity- Captured Angel, Ouch, but Dan Fogelberg's dad really was the leader of our high school band and he was the hometown hero at the time. Susan Dey is also from my home town.
First trip-Decade, over and over and over.
Sorta ran away from home-London Calling

I was always the one in charge of bringing the music to parties, well,more like a few years of one continuous party, just moving from place to place. God, I hauled those crates everywhere, until the day a roommate decided to take them and skip town. A very hard lesson learned.

Then marriage, kids, college, widowhood and work caused music to take a backseat. Only time to be mildly in touch for the next twenty years. Keeping up on everything new was easier with teenagers with excellent musical tastes. When they both had moved out, the first thing I did was dive into music with the vim and vigor of a kid. I have lived and breathed music for the last four years. I always have a feeling of needing to "catch up" on everything I missed and sometimes behave with a little overzealousness. Every turn leads to a new and exciting path and being steered here is something I will forever be grateful for.

:D

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souphound
World Class Ignoramus
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Postby souphound » 28 Mar 2007, 20:04

[quote="Cosmic American Girl"][/quote]

Very cool! How would you describe your musical taste?
Footy wrote:Last week, I discovered that the cordless drill I bought about 5 years ago is, in fact, a cordless screwdiver.

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Walk In My Shadow
Hello Laydeez
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Joined: 23 Jul 2003, 20:02
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Postby Walk In My Shadow » 28 Mar 2007, 20:08

[quote="souphound"][/quote]




Hey that's cool!
Beneluxfunkmeisterlurvegod


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