So, what do we think of "Britpop" now?

Backslapping time. Well done us. We are fantastic.

Britpop...was

One of the most vibrant times in British music
5
7%
Responsible for some of the 90s best stuff
14
20%
Mostly a media-beat up, but a few great groups arose out of it
21
30%
A shamelessly derivative cover-up, in which only a couple of acts justified even half their hype
18
26%
A joke, just terrible mostly
7
10%
What's Britpop?
5
7%
 
Total votes: 70

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Postby Love Vigilante » 08 Dec 2003, 09:30

Just by the by, I went to see Suede last night (for the final time, it would seem) and they were terrific. Brett is a star.
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Postby The Write Profile » 24 Jan 2004, 09:35

Okay, reviving this thread to ask the key question...

Of all those acts who were in that supposed "movement", who will have the most most lasting legacy, if any?

Blur did well in carrying on after Coxon's depature, and Think Tank was actually a very good album at times, even if it was stupendously erratic. Mind you, Blur never made a great album, but they did release several great songs (obviously that's personal opinion)
Think Tank also distances them from their past so dramatically that it gives the impression that they might still have legs for at least a short while yet. It's certainly miles better than the overly-retread Great Escape and the shoe-gazing, grating "13"

Suede's work post- Bernard Butler isn't really that interesting, an it shows badly on the singles collection. They had their moments most certainly, but it's hard to justify their carrying on so long probably.

Supergrass' albums were fun, and I still dust them off every now and then, but it's safe to say that of that "era" so to speak, only SFA's double of Fuzzy Logic/Radiator strikes as purely great "pop music"

Pulp were clearly outsiders, but Different Class is seemingly perfect. I hear Jarvis has been touring with Lee Hazlewood over the last year or so, is that true?

Just out of curiousity, who here has seen the "Live Forever" doco?
It's before my time but I've been told, he never came back from Karangahape Road.

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Postby The Write Profile » 05 Apr 2004, 03:06

Just bumped in case someone has something to comment and/or has seen "Live Forever" doco. I've been wanting to rent it, but the blurb at the back has put me off, almost as self-deluding as the Gallagher brothers it is...
It's before my time but I've been told, he never came back from Karangahape Road.

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Postby Silent Bob » 05 Apr 2004, 14:09

The Right Scarfie Profile wrote:Just bumped in case someone has something to comment and/or has seen "Live Forever" doco. I've been wanting to rent it, but the blurb at the back has put me off, almost as self-deluding as the Gallagher brothers it is...


The Live Forever documentary was poor. People just taking themselves too seriously. Damon Albarn came over as a complete twat.

Of the 2 films about my favourite musical eras, 24 Hour Party People stamps all over this piss poor effort. I was reading the Mojo Britpop special from last year 2 weeks ago (at last!) and the media influence was very evident as well as the copious amount of cocaine going down.

I might have to do myself a Britpop CDR one of these days.
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Postby The Modernist » 05 Apr 2004, 17:18

I remember quite enjoying Live Forever when it was on tv, mainly because Jarvis Cocker and Noel Gallagher were quite entertaining. However in it's attempts to say something more profound about the whole social context of the mid-nineties the documentary was less successful, this is perhaps not surprising as, as others have said already, there was something very vacuous about Britpop; ultimately it was a creation of the media. I thought the cleverest bit of the documentary was when they showed the millenium dome with a soundtrack of Do You Know What I Mean? I thought it was quite perceptive to draw a link between the two. Both were fuelled by the same sense of bombast and self-importance which saw big self-regarding gestures override any sense of content or perspective.
Overall the documentary didn't reach this level of insight very often though and came across more as a collection of soundbites, a slightly more elevated version of all those I Love 1989 type of programmes. Still a moderately entertaining way to while away an hour and a half.

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Postby lemon » 05 Apr 2004, 18:07

Having only been about 7+ at the time and way before I got into "real" music, I sort of missed the whole thing. However, I am now quite getting into it, listening to bands like the Bluetones, Oasis, Blur, Echobelly and a lot of the stuff that led up to it, Stone Roses, Mondays and Black Grape. So er, at the moment I like it, if you'd asked me a couple of months ago (which presumably you did as this is an old topic), I'd have said I hate it.

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Re: So, what do we think of "Britpop" now?

Postby Toby » 09 Aug 2012, 16:34

It's still SHITE

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Re: So, what do we think of "Britpop" now?

Postby Bungo the Mungo » 15 Aug 2012, 17:12

The usual tiresome snobbery on display, I see.