Films, Music and do you have a preference?

Backslapping time. Well done us. We are fantastic.

Do you have a preference?

I prefer films
2
4%
I'm better at expressing my enjoyment of films, but I like both
10
20%
Films and music interlinked are interlinked
3
6%
I'm better at expressing my enjoyment of music, but I like both
10
20%
I prefer music
26
51%
 
Total votes: 51

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Butch Manly
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Postby Butch Manly » 11 Apr 2006, 11:04

The Right Scarfie Profile wrote:Apologies for reviving this thread for the umpteenth time


you just want to eclipse the "straight to hell" thread. :x
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take5_d_shorterer
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Postby take5_d_shorterer » 11 Apr 2006, 16:35

Elect The Modernist! wrote:
take5_d_shorterer wrote:1) The first is that this is something that Jim Woodring mentioned in an interview from the early 1990s in which he was suggesting that cartoons are a more difficult art form to work within because there were fewer tools available for the cartoonist to use to manipulate an audience. I agree. The examples he came up with for movies were a) put a hot chick or b) a sad kid on the the screen, add the appropriate soundtrack, swell accordingly, and voila, instant hard-on or instant sentimentality.

.


Well it's certainly true that cartoons are a far more limited artform in terms of form and expression and in that sense it is more difficult to produce something affecting. At the same time that's why cartoons seldom transcend their own limitations. They are very much a lesser artform in the wider scheme of things.


No. Everything that you said above could be said about the sonnet form compared to, let's say, plays. Yes, the form of a sonnet is much more restrictive, but this does not give us an upper bound on what the expressive power of sonnets is.

Cartoons are impoverished not because of the limitations of the form itself but because of the limitations of its audience.

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Postby The Write Profile » 12 Apr 2006, 07:10

take5_d_shorterer wrote:No. Everything that you said above could be said about the sonnet form compared to, let's say, plays. Yes, the form of a sonnet is much more restrictive, but this does not give us an upper bound on what the expressive power of sonnets is.

Cartoons are impoverished not because of the limitations of the form itself but because of the limitations of its audience.


Absolutely, and it's something I've been thinking about after reading quite a bit of Frank Miller's work recently. Now, he's a terrific artist and is able to evoke a great sense of setting and mood, but his themes are usually very onenote, whether it's Hardboiled, Sin City or the Dark Knight Returns- all of them share very similar preocuppations with vigilante justice and conflicted heroes. The detail is in the image, not in the characters and yet they are incredibly gripping despite their limitations.

I prefer something along the lines of Daniel Clowes' magnificent Ghost World, which managed to capture burgeoning adolescence and the struggle to define oneself in the modern environment far better than any book I've read (certainly better than any film, perhaps even the admittedly excellent adaptation).

Dylan Horrocks's Hicksville, too, is incredible in its scope of references, not just to the comic world, but pop culture in general. It would be very, very difficult to capture the discursive, self-involved feel on film, particularly considering the characters are essentially extensions of Horrocks's personality.

As a form, I don't really like the Sonnet- it seems too contrived, too contained for my liking- but then this is not to discredit the great poetry that it has produced on occasion.
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