Which songs had the most impact on you?

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Postby mentalist (slight return) » 17 Aug 2004, 15:56

Van Morrison - Madame George
I bought Astral Weeks on a cassette twofer, with Moondance on the other side. I was quite young and remember being blown away by all of Astral Weeks, Madame George in particular.

John Coltrane - A Love Supreme
I know this sounds like an absolute cliche to pick this one. But I read so many good things about A Love Supreme so bought it and played it to death, and didn't get or understand the fuss. It didn't connect in any way. Until it clicked one day at Birdland Records in Sydney. It was playing in the background as I was browsing through the CDs and when I wasn't really listening to it it managed to seep it's way in to my stubborn brain. Ambiently dare I say. I though what the fuck is that, and then the familiarlity became clarity. That's A Love Supreme. It suddenly made a whole lot of sense. It's fantastic.

Beck - Nobody's Fault But My Own
I'm not a big lyrics person. If I want great words I'll read a book. Ignorant I know. Anyhow, I remember listening to this once and identifying with it in a profound way at that time for many reasons.

Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five - The Message
Never get sick of this. One of those hip hop foundation songs that everyone knows.

Beatles - Strawberry Fields Forever
I know, another cliche song. But it hit me the first time I took acid with a friend. After about 5 hours wandering around the local park laughing ourselves until it was painful, we retired to his house and put on music, as you do. When Strawberry Fields Forever came on my whole being went WOW. I was connected to the uber-John. And I have never stopped being fascinated with John Lennon. But please no more Beatles Mojo covers.
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Postby Mozz » 17 Aug 2004, 15:57

Nancy Von Eldritch wrote:
The Mozz wrote:To think that TRP will wake up, see his thread has had many responses, and then find that for the most part it's a Nancy-Mr Zebra love-in; he won't be very impressed. :D


I've tried to stop but just couldn't because of him! I thought it was enough.
End of.


BTW, love your avatar!

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Postby Earthling » 17 Aug 2004, 15:57

Most IMPACT..would have to be
'Maxwell's Silver Hammer' (that hurt!) and later
'One Divine Hammer' (which also hurt but with more feeling)

Anon

Postby Anon » 17 Aug 2004, 15:59

Nancy Von Eldritch wrote:
The Mozz wrote:To think that TRP will wake up, see his thread has had many responses, and then find that for the most part it's a Nancy-Mr Zebra love-in; he won't be very impressed. :D


I've tried to stop but just couldn't because of him! I thought it was enough.
End of.
sure, blame me and the family tradition to keep talking when conversation is over!
for shame!

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Postby LeBaron » 17 Aug 2004, 15:59

There's more than five, but I made up for it by substituting superficial remarks for deep insights (as if). In rough chronological order.

Stevie Wonder Sir Duke, John Lennon/Elton Whatever Gets You Through The Night

I'm younger than six, probably four. It's the seventies in San Antonio and I'm riding down Broadway with my mom. Everything is funky. Our car is big and sorta yellow with black leather interior. Summertime in San Antonio is hot. The black leather soaked up all the sun and it was painful to get into the car. The seat belt buckles were out of the question. My mother, while driving alone (without my more reticent father), likes to jam. "Sir Duke" is on the radio and we are jamming. Happy is good, funky is happy.

Fleetwood Mac Over My Head, John Lennon #9 Dream, Joni Mitchell Help Me

Same time period, same car, same surroundings, but my father is in the car, the radio is not as loud, I am in the back seat alone, and it is dark. I lie down as we drive, watching the light from the street lights rhythmically swish across the ceiling of the car. The world is a stranger, more ambiguous place, but I like that too. Music does not have to be happy to be good and I do not have to be happy to be happy. Today, these songs are like a bubblebath and I still think they all rock like crazy.

Led Zeppelin Good Times, Bad Times

I am 8 or 9 years old. My older cousin is determined to make me a rocker in his image. He gives me Led Zeppelin IV for Christmas. However, he simultaneously receives a tape with LZI on one side and LZIV on the other. We trade so I can have more LZ. I play it later by myself and am floored. I have never heard anything like this. Taken as a whole, the tape is perfect in every way. Robert Plant and Jimmy Page are my big brothers. The other guys are my cousins. I am the world's biggest Led Zeppelin fan.

Osborne Brothers/Goolaks Rocky Top

I am 10. There is an assembly at my elementary school and the local country dance band is playing. The Goolaks. It must've been the end of the school year. This is exciting because although I've seen pictures of drum sets and electric guitars, I've never seen people play them in the flesh and rarely on TV. I'm ok with country music because I like Alabama and a few other things. I think they rock. They did rock. They played "Rocky Top" and though it isn't much like the original version, when I finally heard the original version, it was what I had heard in my head the whole time. Country music can get stuck in your head and everything.

Byrds Bells of Rhymney, Chimes of Freedom

I am 12 or 13. I have a little brother, so I'm not the only child anymore. I have my own tapes, one of which is the Byrd's Greatest Hits. In retrospect, it's obvious that a rock snob didn't compile it because it doesn't really have their best songs on it. It's almost as if it was made for kids. Anyway, this is where I start to really listen to music in a more solitary way. These two songs always stuck out. I loved the harmonies of "Chimes of Freedom" when they get to the doo doo dee dee dum bit. As for "Bells of Rhymney," I always liked the guitars. I couldn't choose one over the other.

R.E.M. Murmur LP

I am 16. I saw R.E.M. with Robyn Hitchcock when I was 15. It was my first real rock show. Everybody rocked like crazy. Who knew they had it in them? Peter Buck moved around kinda like Jimmy Page. They were cooler than I expected. Murmur is the greatest thing I've ever heard. How could you pick a song? Sorry there Profile. Guess this belongs somewhere else. Too late now. It is uncanny that they were able to get so many details about my environment exactly right. How could they have known? For the first time, I think I can relate to a band and I feel like they would understand me too. They are my new big brothers. Thanks LZ, nice knowin' ya. Lots of laughs.

Doug Sahm/Sir Doug (Is Anybody Goin' To) San Antone?

I am in college in Pennsylvania. I am probably 20. Until I am 21, Pennsylvania SUCKS except for when I'm on the radio or reading for class. All my friends pledged frats. Fuck em', they'll be back. This sucks. The best song on Uncle Tupelo's record is a Doug Sahm song. Maybe he's not one of those stupid Austin hippies after all. I go to the dodgy record shop and get the hits. Immediately, it's perfect. But at the end of the cd, loopy Doug, already my friend, says "This is a song about my hometown," and launches into the tune. It's my hometown too. And what about Doug? He's a German guy too and he's not a totally square and anal domino freak like the rest -- in fact, he seems pretty cool to me. The fiddles are all choppy and messed up and the pedal steel is perfect. Doug really is my brother, those R.E.M. guys were no fun anyway. This music is perfect. I want to be back in San Antone. These Yankees are weird. All they talk about is jerking off and doing whippets. Get me outta here.

Horace Silver Moon Rays

I am still in Pennsylvania and everything sucks even worse. I start off my regular radio show with "Everybody (everyone?) Knows This is Nowhere" every week. This is a pretty average Horace Silver tune (he's a favorite of mine), but I had it in the headphones and was walking down Chew St. between the two cemeteries at dusk on a crisp fall night. For some reason, I was totally despondent and was about to cry and then this song came on. I remembered I had liked it in the past and started listening. The release in the tune was amazing. The song single handedly lifted me out of whatever funk I was in. I've never been that depressed since. Lucky me.

Beach Boys Til' I Die

If there was one song I wished I had written, this is it. First heard it during the record store days in San Marcos, TX. Perfect. Brian Wilson is not my brother though.
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Postby Guest » 17 Aug 2004, 16:11

Horace Silver Moon Rays-----I've never been that depressed since. Lucky me.



Funny, Prescription for the Blues really makes me happy as well. Not one of his 'classic' works, but what a tune! Horace does that to people.

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Postby NancyL21st » 17 Aug 2004, 17:21

The Mozz wrote:
Nancy Von Eldritch wrote:
The Mozz wrote:To think that TRP will wake up, see his thread has had many responses, and then find that for the most part it's a Nancy-Mr Zebra love-in; he won't be very impressed. :D


I've tried to stop but just couldn't because of him! I thought it was enough.
End of.


BTW, love your avatar!


Thank you, Mozzer! Gorgeous Siouxsie Sioux is on it. I love your current one too! :-)

Mr. Zebra wrote: sure, blame me and the family tradition to keep talking when conversation is over!
for shame!


I just didn't want this thread to be ruined further on anymore. That's all. I still love you, Phaeton (ahem) Mr. Zebra. End of conversation! :wink:
...Pick me up
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Anon

Postby Anon » 17 Aug 2004, 17:27

Nancy Von Eldritch wrote:
The Mozz wrote:
Nancy Von Eldritch wrote:
The Mozz wrote:To think that TRP will wake up, see his thread has had many responses, and then find that for the most part it's a Nancy-Mr Zebra love-in; he won't be very impressed. :D


I've tried to stop but just couldn't because of him! I thought it was enough.
End of.


BTW, love your avatar!


Thank you, Mozzer! Gorgeous Siouxsie Sioux is on it. I love your current one too! :-)

Mr. Zebra wrote: sure, blame me and the family tradition to keep talking when conversation is over!
for shame!


I just didn't want this thread to be ruined further on anymore. That's all. I still love you, Phaeton (ahem) Mr. Zebra. End of conversation! :wink:
yes ma'am
*salutes*

everyone, back on topic! NOW!!

edit: mmm... siouxsie... fond memories...

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Postby the masked man » 17 Aug 2004, 17:51

I've been thinking about this all day, and I think I've got five ones that hit me hard during my life:

1) Walk On The Wild Side - Lou Reed. I must have been eight or nine when I heard this, and it sounded like nothing I'd ever heard before; it barely even sounded like 'pop' music as I understood it. I loved Herbie Flowers's bassline, and the way the singer was basically just talking his way through the record. It was all so mysterious, as if in a code I'd only understand when older. This was true, as I lost track of this for about ten years - as a student in the mid-80s I bought "Transformer" and couldn't believe the lyrics. Presumably, this had escaped censorship because the BBC was as innocent as I was of the song's true meaning back in the day.

2) Autobahn - Kraftwerk. I heard this when I was nine, and it seemed even further away from commerciality, yet was still highly accessible. I couldn't understand the lyrics, yet I just loved the whole feel of the record, the way sound panned from speaker to speaker. It was all very cinematic, and it open my eyes to the fact that music could be as much about texture as melody. Only in the last few years have I spotted the cheeky reference to The Beach Boys' "Fun Fun Fun", however...

3) New Dawn Fades - Joy Division. I heard John Peel play this the night he announced the sad news of Ian Curtis' suicide. I wasn't too aware of the band at this point, but on hearing the first few bars, I knew this was the band I was looking for. Bleak but paradoxically uplifting, the brooding atmosphere of this song spills over into shattering violence by the song's peak. To this day, I have not heard any rock music as powerful as this.

4) When Doves Cry - Prince. Again, it was the unusual sound of this record that attracted me so much. There's no bassline; the electronic percussion sounds like billiard balls being struck; and queasy washes of synthesizer are everywhere. It was as skeletal as a demo, yet you couldn't forget it once you'd heard it, and it was a genuine emotional experience. If it were released today, it would still sound ahead of its time.

5) You Made Me Realise - My Bloody Valentine. This proved that, even in the late eighties, it was possible to take a standard guitar/bass/drums line-up and create something new. Once more, this has an amazing sound, heavily distorted but carefully controlled; it's the musical equivalent of a carcrash in slow motion. There's even a sweet vocal harmony buried in the busy mix which just gives the track a pop edge before it descends into a glorious bliss-out of feedback. "Loveless" is usually regarded as MBV's masterpiece, but I always think that, great as that record is, it's tame and sterile compared to this monster of a record.

I could have picked more than five, but if asked to define my tastes in five songs (impossible, of course), I'd choose these records.

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Postby Guest » 17 Aug 2004, 17:58

Joe the Lion - Bowie, for pure being weirded out there and capable of anything, such as posting too much.

Erik Satie - Gymnopedies, for just plain being out there

Resurrection Shuffle - Ashton, Gardner and Dyke, one of my first ever singles, and which epitomizes rock and roll for me. IE, a lot of bombastic bullshit which, for some reason, we go nuts for.

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Postby andymacandy » 17 Aug 2004, 18:00

The Carpet Crawl by Genesis, from Seconds Out.
This was the moment when I grew up, when music suddenly meant something.
I always loved listening to the radio, and taped the chart shows, so music was always in my life, but it was hearing this for the first time that it stirred me into new places.Firstly, nobody ever heard this stuff on Radio 1, and the other kids looked blank too.But it had a sweeping orchestral beauty that lifted me to places I didnt know music went to.
Okay, so I know its Genesis, and its not even the best one, or the Gabriel one, or the one that I play most often.But it did it.I then started to look for music, rather than let it come to me.I started to find things that moved me, made me think, or cry, or just make space to listen too.
Music stopped being a pastime, and became a passion.

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Postby take5_d_shorterer » 17 Aug 2004, 22:33

Q: Name something that's changed you.

For the most part, I feel that I am largely invariant. That is to say, I am what I am, and art has almost no ability to change me (although it can at times interest and amuse me). I've listened for many years to The Beatles, and while I've observed some of the monumental things they've implied about what democracy (and have pointed this out), I have done almost nothing in my personal life to put this into effect. Similarly, while I appreciate Firesign Theatre or The Who Sell Out, their particular brands of commercial absurdity has had almost no real influence on how I create things in my day-to-day life. Bach is almost a world in an of himself, yet the actual brass tacks of absorbing counterpoint and becoming a mystic are too much for me, and I can't say that I've been bothered to pursue much of this at any length. Thelonious Monk stands as maybe the most important eccentric in American music. He suggested possibilities that we really haven't been to explore--I mean ``we'' as in all musicians, but I also mean that I am not likely to explore any of these possibilities really either, so I can understand why we've generally been so thick about his accomplishments.

The one thing that may have changed how I write (and maybe how I think) is Walter Benjamin's One-Way Street. Once a long time ago, I tried to write in the style outlined in that book. I've since become verbose and lost the feel of aphorism.

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Postby The Write Profile » 18 Aug 2004, 02:22

Good to see Mr Zebra on this board! :)

Anyway, I've got time for 5 more

Dusty Springfield--Son of A Preacher Man

There's something about this song, that always hooks me--the perfectly understated vocal, and then the way it moves into orgasmic overdrive, the taboo nature of the story, the drums, the horns. It's all of a piece, but in the middle, there's Dusty.

The Clash--The Right Profile

Yeah, well you would expect that wouldn't you? Except, I think, this song, more than any other, summarises why I love the Clash. It's the sheer rambunctiousness of it, the realisation that, yes, it's a mess, Joe's vocal is all over the place, the horns don't come in on any moment that could be described as "on time", Mick Jones' guitar-riff is just a simple one-two-three chord strum...Yet, it's got the energy, the wit, and the arrogance that drew me into this band

Che Fu- Chains

This is kind of a special song for me. I do actually remember when this song came out, when I was 12, and it topping the NZ charts (back then, it was very rare for a NZ song to top the NZ singles charts). And once again, there is something genuinely antipodean about the song, though I didn't realise it at the time. Particularly in his musings about being a Pacific Islander living miles away from home, though this is the best home for him. And the fact that it was written on a 8-track, and managed to contain three vocal over-dubs, a scratch sample and a great riff, says a lot about kiwi ingenuity too.


DJ Shadow--Building Steam with a Grain of Salt...

Endtroducing is one of the two or three albums that really shook me up. I wasn't expecting it too either, but here was a perfectly, fully fledged song, that...wasn't a song at all, in the traditional songwriting sense. But it was marvellous

Sly & The Family Stone- I Aint Got Nobody (for Real)

This was the first Sly track that I played constantly for a week. Oh boy, was it worth it. These days there are others which I consider much better SFS tracks, but it's always the first one that's important.
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Postby Copehead » 18 Aug 2004, 02:47

I think there is a special time in your life when your musical tastes are formed, for me in my late teens. So while the Sex Pistols and ac/dc were important when I was growing up in the late 70s and bands like Public Enemy and Belle and Sebastian came along later there are only 3 songs that actually defined my tastes in that malleable period.

The 3 are

Atmosphere - Joy Division
I can remember laughing at the vocal performance on this single when my mate Aled played it for me, but I still went out and bought it the next day anyway.

This Charming Man -The Smiths
I can remember driving back back from Oxford with 2 friends after picking one of them up from college there, we listened to a tape with the Smiths on one side and talking heads 77 on the other, I bought both albums but the Smiths became a way of life.

Upside Down -JAMC

I can remember talking to a guy from East Kilbride about them, he thought they were shit, but he was heavily into cool funk and was resolutley anti-rockist ( remember those days when being rockist was a crime? pah! )so I assumed he was a perfect negative indicator, if he hated it it must be good, and it was, I knew from the first second of squeeling feedback that this was one of the best songs ever.

apologies for the typing but I am in the middle of severe tropical storm Megi here and I am hanging on to the desk grimly as i write.
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Postby Owen » 18 Aug 2004, 02:59

Let's go crazy - prince
Some candy talking - JAMC
Perfect Circle - REM
wednesday night prayer meeting - charles mingus
I'm your puppet - Dan Penn and spooner Oldham

I wouldn't be the same person without them

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Postby Ivana Padham-Purtleigh » 18 Aug 2004, 03:29

Only one song has ever had a massive impact on me. 'I've never been to me' by Charlene.

I was in tears as I listened to it.
It's that man you fought with this morning
the same one you're going to make love with tonight

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Postby LeBaron » 18 Aug 2004, 03:31

Owen wrote:Perfect Circle - REM


This is one of my faves. The live version I saw them do in 89 was cool because there were drums behind it that gave it just the right backbone. Of course, the version on Murmur is perfect, but the live version was a treat. As seen on tourfilm.
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Postby Owen » 18 Aug 2004, 03:34

Trill Azz Baron wrote:
Owen wrote:Perfect Circle - REM


This is one of my faves. The live version I saw them do in 89 was cool because there were drums behind it that gave it just the right backbone. Of course, the version on Murmur is perfect, but the live version was a treat. As seen on tourfilm.


when I was Ivana's age a girlfriend and I would exchange tapes every week we were apart and Perfect Cirlce was on every one going one way and Fall On Me was on every one going the other.

The live versions do really add something to it. the Bingo Hand Job one that is prefixed with 'you're from south wales right' (which I am) as Stipes put down to brain dead hecklers is a particular fave

marios

Postby marios » 18 Aug 2004, 04:47

I like what i'm reading so far! I never consciously think about this stuff so it's difficult to revisit it like this but i'll try.

As a kid a lot of the music that got stuck in my head wasn't from the radio or albums, it was from movies. So, now that i think about it i'd say these songs kinda paved the way for my future musical explorations:

Ritchie Valens - La Bamba

Loved the film, with Lou Diamond Phillips! My cousin, who later moved to the US, and i used to rent it on video all the time when we were kids (8-10 years old). I always felt sad by the end of it but i couldn't keep this song out of my head! Rock'n'roll and in a language that sounded so strange to me...yet it was so immediate and memorable! Thinking about it now this could very well be ground zero for me.

Jerry Lee Lewis - Great Balls Of Fire

I must have been 12 when i first rented this film and i just couldn't believe what a crazy bastard this guy was and how right his music sounded! This is the point when i invented the Air Piano(TM)!

Elvis Presley - Hound Dog

Those Elvis films were on TV all the time when i was a kid and i actually did like a few of them. This song wasn't in any of them (as far as i know) but an uncle of mine gave me an Elvis tape he had in the car and i remember playing this song to death. The King was probably my first idol...i even got a poster for my wall :roll:

The Blues Brothers - Gimme Some Lovin' (the Spencer Davis Group song from the film)

If i remember correctly the boys don't even get to sing the song but they do play the introduction before they're heckled by a crowd full of drunk cowboys. I'm not sure if it's repeated later on in the film but that's the scene that's stayed with me and the song was like dynamite! Some real gems on the soundtrack but for some reason this is the one i always associated with the film.

The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night

Not film related this one (actually this where the film connection kinda stops). A friend of mine was a huge fan and he always played this for me when i went over to his house. I thought my Elvis fixation was much cooler though... It would take me another 11 years to finally start buying the records and paying attention to the music. Sometimes i wish i payed more attention back then...instead the only thing that had stuck was this song.

Nirvana - Smells Like Teen Spirit / Soundgarden - Black Hole Sun

I'm a teenager now and i kinda feel i am obliged to rebel against all that Greek pop nonsense that everyone else seems to be enjoying so much. I work for a couple of weeks in the summer at the CyBC (Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation - my father who worked there got me the job) as an errand boy and the huge perk was that i could sneak into the music library quite easily and once the ladies there got to know me they would let me take CDs into the listening booth. A friend of mine who also worked there was into grunge and suggested we play some Nirvana and some Soundgarden and he promised that it would blow me away! At the time it really did...Nevermind was one of the first CDs i ever bought and from that point on i think i started looking at music as sth i could spend money on, not just trade mix tapes of stuff i recorded off the radio.

Jimi Hendrix - All Along The Watchtower / Them - Baby Please Don't Go

I included these 2 together because they were both on the first CD i ever bought: the Blue Chips soundtrack :roll: I bought my first CD player at the time of the film's release and i was a huge basketball nut back then. I needed sth to test the CD player when i got back home but i didn't have a lot of time to choose so i grabbed it, took it to the counter, payed for it and regretted it all the way home. First time i played it i wasn't really into it at all. And there were some stupid medleys on it and shit. Then i started paying more attention and these 2 songs started creeping up on me. This purchase led me to get a Jimi best of, a Dylan best of and even a Led Zep best of. No Them for quite a few years i'm afraid though.

The Stooges - Search And Destroy

I'm at university and i finally start to buy music a bit more methodically. After investigating stuff by the usual rock deities i decide to dig a bit deeper and go for sth described in a few articles i had read as proto-punk and garage rock. I wasn't sure if i'd like sth like that but if there was ever a song that grabbed me by the balls and didn't let go from the first second then this was it! This is the song that destroyed my childish notion that i could have a collection of 20 CDs and be content. How can i be content when there might be such great music out there waiting to be discovered?!

VU - Venus In Furs

This was the most incredible and inventive song in the world for me when i discovered it 3 years ago. A bit too dramatic for me these days but back then it meant a lot to me.

Marvin Gaye - I Heard It Through The Grapevine

I had heard soul before but this song made me realize this was a genre i could actually spend money on. Before this song i never paid much attention to soul music...lesson learned.

JAMC - Just Like Honey

I had sworn never to purchase anything released in the 80s as it was the decade of bad dress sense, bad haircuts and even worse music. So much stuff i loathed was from this decade and i couldn't really feel any need to risk the little money i had on an 80s album. Having discovered VU first convinced me that this was a band i should take more notice of. Funny name, i remember thinking, and fortunately the debut was in a 3-for-20 offer at the local MusicZone.

Mission Of Burma - That's When I Reach For My Revolver

I remember someone on the Mojo board mentioning it (Giselle Fauquet i think) and thinking it was such a cool title for a song. I decided to get the EP and it became a huge huge favourite, and further reinforced my newfound love for music released in the 80s.

Johnny Cash - A Boy Named Sue

This is the song that, more than any other, helped me understand that country music ain't shit...cause that's what i thought about it, more or less. Perhaps it was the humour, or the storytelling, or the ferocity of the performer, or the crowd in the prison loving every minute of it but i was hooked!

The Beatles - I Saw Her Standing There

I had always dismissed the Beatles' early period as disposable pop, something i would never have the need to own, yet when The Slider sent me some CD-Rs of their early albums i just couldn't get enough! This song was, and still is, one of my fave Beatles tunes.

The Rolling Stones - Under My Thumb

OK, i could do many many more of these but i'll just bring you as up to date as possible and this track by the Stones, which i'm sure i'd heard before but didn't properly own until i got Aftermath a few weeks ago, is the latest one in this long series of songs that pushed all the right buttons and got me singing along like a madman! Despite its misogynistic undertones i really love this song!

Shit, i'm sitting here thinking of at least a dozen more but this is getting ridiculously long as it is. Take care.

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Postby LeBaron » 18 Aug 2004, 04:59

Magic Marios wrote:The Rolling Stones - Under My Thumb


Compare with "Monkey Man" ... two of the best things that they ever did! (and then there was 19th Nervous Breakdown and Exile)
Quaco wrote:Are you fucking high?

take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.