Which songs had the most impact on you?

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Dave the Jackal
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Postby Dave the Jackal » 27 Sep 2004, 19:34

Hendrix 'killing floor' from the BBC album-Just got me obsessed with the big distorted sound of an electric guitar.
Pink Floyd-'Echoes' Like having a bath
Sly and the family Stone-Family Affair. Nuff said
either the intro or the outro from 'Histoire de melody Nelson'
'A love supreme'

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Postby Prez! » 27 Sep 2004, 21:06

Silence is golden - The Tremeloes

It was 1967,I was 7 years old,I still remember every word.I remember hearing it on a radio in class at school and amusing my teacher by singing it all the way through under my breath.

Don't let it die - Hurricane Smith

A pretty serious song for an eleven year old,but it still sounds good to me now.

Teenage Kicks - The Undertones

Needs no explanation.

Man out of Time - Elvis Costello & The Attractions

Profound because it represented the peak {and end} of a much loved singers career.

Pressure Drop - Robert Palmer

Again,needs no explanation,other than it convinced me white men could do reggae.

The Modernist

Postby The Modernist » 27 Sep 2004, 21:34

Blockbuster -The Sweet
I remember finding it very exciting but not quite knowing why. The first pop record to make an impression on me.
In My Life - The Beatles

Pop music was banned in my household (it's a long story). I came across a recorded tape of The Beatles 62-66 and it was like discovering some hidden contraband. It was like alchemy, suddenly my world seemed more transformed and exotic. I liked this track in particular, I became a Beatles obsessive after that.

No More Heroes - The Stranglers. The first punk record I remember buying. I bought it off a bloke at school. I soon left The Stranglers behind and got into The Clash. Great single though.

Sex Machine - James Brown As a young teenager, I was wary of soul and dance music. I thought alternative music was somehow superior, much of this, I now realise, was because I was uncomfortable with the physical nature of soul. I heard this on the radio and it blew me away. Shortly after I started going to clubs and parties and it all made sense. It kickstarted my lifelong love of jazz, soul, funk etc.

The Message - Grandmaster Flash. The first hip-hop record to blow me away. I'd never heard anything so pared down and to the point.

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Postby Conrad Knight Socks » 27 Sep 2004, 21:41

In recent years

Ready or not, by the Fugees;
Jumpin' jumpin' by Destiny's Child
Can't get you out of my head, by Kylie
I kept thinking "swim as far as you can, swim as far as you can".

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Matt Wilson
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Postby Matt Wilson » 27 Sep 2004, 21:49

So many to choose from, so little time...

Shaun Cassidy--Rebel Rebel
So much better than Bowie's version. When Cheapniz sent me this I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Shaun's innate sense of style and class just rips the Dame's version to smithereens. Rock and fuckin' Roll.

Insane Clown Posse--complete recorded works
I suppose I could choose, but what would be the point? The same for G.G. Allin's work...

Helen Ready--I Am Woman
I've lauded this masterpiece before, and heavens--I'm sure I'll do it again. Nothing has put me in touch with my inner woman more than this estrogen ode to you-go-girls everywhere. Hand me a tissue, sister.

Morrissey--I'm a Whiney Little Fuck and I Can't Shut Up
I can't really remember the exact single which changed my life, but I think this was the title.


There was also some Scott Walker song where he was singing about French existentialists revolting against Da Da in the 1920s whose title escapes me. Sorry.

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Postby Guest » 27 Sep 2004, 21:51

Matt Wilson wrote:So many to choose from, so little time...

Shaun Cassidy--Rebel Rebel
So much better than Bowie's version. When Cheapniz sent me this I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Shaun's innate sense of style and class just rips the Dame's version to smithereens. Rock and fuckin' Roll.

Insane Clown Posse--complete recorded works
I suppose I could choose, but what would be the point? The same for G.G. Allin's work...

Helen Ready--I Am Woman
I've lauded this masterpiece before, and heavens--I'm sure I'll do it again. Nothing has put me in touch with my inner woman more than this estrogen ode to you-go-girls everywhere. Hand me a tissue, sister.

Morrissey--I'm a Whiney Little Fuck and I Can't Shut Up
I can't really remember the exact single which changed my life, but I think this was the title.


There was also some Scott Walker song where he was singing about French existentialists revolting against Da Da in the 1920s whose title escapes me. Sorry.


Gee Matt, that's swell and sweet of you and all, but you could at least spell my name right.....

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Postby Conrad Knight Socks » 27 Sep 2004, 21:54

Matt Wilson wrote:So many to choose from, so little time...

Shaun Cassidy--Rebel Rebel
So much better than Bowie's version. When Cheapniz sent me this I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Shaun's innate sense of style and class just rips the Dame's version to smithereens. Rock and fuckin' Roll.

Insane Clown Posse--complete recorded works
I suppose I could choose, but what would be the point? The same for G.G. Allin's work...

Helen Ready--I Am Woman
I've lauded this masterpiece before, and heavens--I'm sure I'll do it again. Nothing has put me in touch with my inner woman more than this estrogen ode to you-go-girls everywhere. Hand me a tissue, sister.

Morrissey--I'm a Whiney Little Fuck and I Can't Shut Up
I can't really remember the exact single which changed my life, but I think this was the title.


There was also some Scott Walker song where he was singing about French existentialists revolting against Da Da in the 1920s whose title escapes me. Sorry.


I think the Morrisey song you mean is Heaven knows I'm miserable now, which is the Smiths, not Morrisey, and changed the lives of all who heard it during the Miners' Strike.
I kept thinking "swim as far as you can, swim as far as you can".

The Modernist

Postby The Modernist » 27 Sep 2004, 21:56

Oh No Not Susan wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:So many to choose from, so little time...

Shaun Cassidy--Rebel Rebel
So much better than Bowie's version. When Cheapniz sent me this I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Shaun's innate sense of style and class just rips the Dame's version to smithereens. Rock and fuckin' Roll.

Insane Clown Posse--complete recorded works
I suppose I could choose, but what would be the point? The same for G.G. Allin's work...

Helen Ready--I Am Woman
I've lauded this masterpiece before, and heavens--I'm sure I'll do it again. Nothing has put me in touch with my inner woman more than this estrogen ode to you-go-girls everywhere. Hand me a tissue, sister.

Morrissey--I'm a Whiney Little Fuck and I Can't Shut Up
I can't really remember the exact single which changed my life, but I think this was the title.


There was also some Scott Walker song where he was singing about French existentialists revolting against Da Da in the 1920s whose title escapes me. Sorry.


I knew you were a man of taste Matt. Of course French existentialism didn't start until the forties...

The Modernist

Postby The Modernist » 27 Sep 2004, 21:57

Angel Heart wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:So many to choose from, so little time...

Shaun Cassidy--Rebel Rebel
So much better than Bowie's version. When Cheapniz sent me this I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Shaun's innate sense of style and class just rips the Dame's version to smithereens. Rock and fuckin' Roll.

Insane Clown Posse--complete recorded works
I suppose I could choose, but what would be the point? The same for G.G. Allin's work...

Helen Ready--I Am Woman
I've lauded this masterpiece before, and heavens--I'm sure I'll do it again. Nothing has put me in touch with my inner woman more than this estrogen ode to you-go-girls everywhere. Hand me a tissue, sister.

Morrissey--I'm a Whiney Little Fuck and I Can't Shut Up
I can't really remember the exact single which changed my life, but I think this was the title.


There was also some Scott Walker song where he was singing about French existentialists revolting against Da Da in the 1920s whose title escapes me. Sorry.


I think the Morrisey song you mean is Heaven knows I'm miserable now, which is the Smiths, not Morrisey, and changed the lives of all who heard it during the Miners' Strike.


Apart from Ian MacGregor maybe.

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Postby Conrad Knight Socks » 27 Sep 2004, 22:00

ElModernisto wrote:
Angel Heart wrote:
Matt Wilson wrote:So many to choose from, so little time...

Shaun Cassidy--Rebel Rebel
So much better than Bowie's version. When Cheapniz sent me this I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. Shaun's innate sense of style and class just rips the Dame's version to smithereens. Rock and fuckin' Roll.

Insane Clown Posse--complete recorded works
I suppose I could choose, but what would be the point? The same for G.G. Allin's work...

Helen Ready--I Am Woman
I've lauded this masterpiece before, and heavens--I'm sure I'll do it again. Nothing has put me in touch with my inner woman more than this estrogen ode to you-go-girls everywhere. Hand me a tissue, sister.

Morrissey--I'm a Whiney Little Fuck and I Can't Shut Up
I can't really remember the exact single which changed my life, but I think this was the title.


There was also some Scott Walker song where he was singing about French existentialists revolting against Da Da in the 1920s whose title escapes me. Sorry.


I think the Morrisey song you mean is Heaven knows I'm miserable now, which is the Smiths, not Morrisey, and changed the lives of all who heard it during the Miners' Strike.


Apart from Ian MacGregor maybe.


Did he hear it?
I kept thinking "swim as far as you can, swim as far as you can".

The Modernist

Postby The Modernist » 27 Sep 2004, 22:06

Strangely enough the musical tastes of Ian MacGregor have gone undocumented in histories of the miner's strike.
I do remember Arthur Scargill wearing a Frankie goes To Hollywood baseball cap though.

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Postby Conrad Knight Socks » 27 Sep 2004, 22:15

ElModernisto wrote:Strangely enough the musical tastes of Ian MacGregor have gone undocumented in histories of the miner's strike.


How bizarre is that? Surely there's a "Desert Island Discs" tape somewhere. If not, I think we should demand a public enquiry.
I kept thinking "swim as far as you can, swim as far as you can".

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Guy E
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Postby Guy E » 27 Sep 2004, 22:42

Five of the more important ones, certainly…

I Saw Her Standing – The Beatles (b/w I Want To Hold Your Hand)
The first 45 I bought, probably played it ten times a day in early 1964. In my mind, rock and roll had sprung fully-formed from the loins of these youthful alien creatures from Liverpool.

Mr. Tambourine Man – The Byrds
My introduction to the mysterious B. Dylan. I had developed a habit of noting which songs the Beatles did and did not write themselves, but hadn’t explored any of the mysterious authors. With this shimmering classic I not only found myself a new favorite band, but embarked on my first archeological investigation, culminating in the purchase (some months later) of Positively 4th Street.

A Whiter Shade of Pale – Procol Harum
A great record and one that seemed to suggest unlimited possibilities in music.

Sympathy for the Devil – The Rolling Stones
I didn’t know what to expect when I brought home Beggars Banquet, purchased with funds earmarked for family Christmas shopping. I sat on the floor staring in disbelief at the speakers of my portable Hi-Fi as the hypnotic groove unfolded for six-minutes. My jaw hung open for the duration of the LP, which I promptly flipped back to Side One for a replay.

Little Johnny Jewel – Television
Those who cannot understand why Television are considered Punk did not experience the shock of the new in hearing this independent split-side 45 in 1976. Abrasive, minimal, expressionistic… I knew the world of music had changed after listening to this record for the first time, and it had.

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Postby Very Stable Baron » 27 Sep 2004, 23:07

Guy E wrote:Sympathy for the Devil – The Rolling Stones
I didn’t know what to expect when I brought home Beggars Banquet, purchased with funds earmarked for family Christmas shopping. I sat on the floor staring in disbelief at the speakers of my portable Hi-Fi as the hypnotic groove unfolded for six-minutes. My jaw hung open for the duration of the LP, which I promptly flipped back to Side One for a replay.


I can't even imagine.
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Postby Quaco » 27 Sep 2004, 23:15

Guy E wrote:A Whiter Shade of Pale – Procol Harum
A great record and one that seemed to suggest unlimited possibilities in music.

I would like to have heard this at the time and and been old enough to feel this.
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Postby The Write Profile » 28 Sep 2004, 01:07

Two more....

Al Green-- Simply Beautiful

An amalgam of that voice, that tune, and the sheer, rapture of a man who knows he can give the lady what he wants (and vice versa). An incredibly understated song of vocal dexterity, not just soulful, but revelatory

James Brown--Get on Up (Turn It Loose)

The first time I heard this I realised exactly what made the guy great, it's the fact that he was a conductor, he could hold the band, tell them to go anywhere he wanted. And every direction seemed to whiplash the listener.
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Postby Snarfyguy » 28 Sep 2004, 02:38

In chronological order, the songs that had the biggest impact on me:

The Royal Guardsmen - Snoopy vs. The Red Baron

Initally encountered at school as a youngster of about eight years old, this song initiated a lifelong love of garage rock.

The Rolling Stones - Dandelion

For me, this was what being thirteen years old sounded like.

The Velvet Underground - I'm Waiting for My Man

Not pretty, but surpassingly beautiful.

The Sex Pistols - Anarchy for the U.K.

Finally, music that wasn't already ten + years old by the time I found out about it. Raw, bracing, scandalous and contemporary!

The Soft Machine - Side 1 Suite from Soft Machine II

I'd heard stuff like Yes and Rush and Genesis, but this was the first thing I knew of that was complex and brainy, but that really hit that melodious and idiosyncratic sweet spot that I always look for in music.

Wait, that's five already? I'm not even out of my teens yet! Well, I guess maybe your formative years are the most important in laying the groundwork of what's important to you.
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