NEW Boardgames thread

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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watts
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby watts » 22 Jul 2014, 01:40

Corporate whore wrote:Power Grid- classic game.

Have you played Fearsome Floors? It's another game from Freideman Freese; basically it's a clever movement game about crossing a cellar without being caught by Frankenstein, great fun.


Fearsome floors looks like a must buy for us! Thanks for the heads up!

Ray K. wrote:We played Chronoaunts this weekend and the girls loved it - actually knew more about 20th Century history than I expected. It was someone else's game so I have now been instructed to purchase it.


I read that as Chrono Aunts! So there's me all geeky excited over the idea of some kind of Madeline L'Engle based game about Auntie Whatsit, Aunt Who, and Aunt Which....

Chrononauts looks like fun too. Thanks for the recommendation Ray.
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 10 Jan 2015, 19:34

Played a few games over Xmas

Machi Koro - sort of Settlers of Catan meets Dominion. Liked this a lot.

Sushi Go - fast card drafting game - like it a lot.

I'm also waiting on my copy of the Mushroom Eaters, which should be dropping on my porch soon.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby straw mimsy » 11 Jan 2015, 01:00

I haven't been following this thread, but do love games.
I don't know if it's been mentioned before, but we started playing Istanbul this holiday. I really like it, and I don't know any games that are similar. I've also never known any games to have SO many different parts or pieces, just setting it up has about 20 different things you have to do. Still, the actual game-play works very nicely. I like that it has a board that can be changed around for a shorter or longer game. The point of the game is to collect gems, and they are so pretty you actually really DO want to go out and collect them. There also are so many different ways of playing it. I taught it to 5 people who wanted to play, without playing myself. Without picking up a strategy from someone who had played before, each person went about playing in a completely different way. It's also similar to Ticket to Ride (another family favourite) in that everyone gets into their only little game, that it almost doesn't matter who wins in the end. I kind of like that. Each turn is like deciding what you want to do around Istanbul that day..."Oh I quite fancy popping into the mosque/post-office", "Let me see what I can get for these rings at the large market, today".

We played a lot of Ticket to Ride as well, with the 1912 expansion pack. Also, Zum um Zug the German board. Eurgh I hate that version. Much too stressful, and far too competitive for me.

I also played the Werewolf game. We only played twice...but it didn't work as smoothly as I think it was supposed to. It was good fun to see how little some people trust other people, though.

Played Dixit a LOT. Unfortunately, I figured out the reason why I used to lose so badly is that I sort of enjoyed coming up with my own interpretation of those beautiful illustrations, whether people would be able to guess the clues or not. Then I realised it's pretty strategic, and a lot of the game is about using as many inside jokes as you can manage. I still like the pictures though.

Someone also gave me Rapscallion for Christmas, but haven't been able to figure out the rules just yet.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Ray K. » 11 Jan 2015, 02:38

A new favorite at our house.... Tokaido. Just strolling down a road collecting stuff. Such a pretty game.

Love Letter as well as been a regular play.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 11 Jan 2015, 07:52

all mimsy wrote:I haven't been following this thread, but do love games.
I don't know if it's been mentioned before, but we started playing Istanbul this holiday. I really like it, and I don't know any games that are similar. I've also never known any games to have SO many different parts or pieces, just setting it up has about 20 different things you have to do. Still, the actual game-play works very nicely. I like that it has a board that can be changed around for a shorter or longer game. The point of the game is to collect gems, and they are so pretty you actually really DO want to go out and collect them. There also are so many different ways of playing it. I taught it to 5 people who wanted to play, without playing myself. Without picking up a strategy from someone who had played before, each person went about playing in a completely different way. It's also similar to Ticket to Ride (another family favourite) in that everyone gets into their only little game, that it almost doesn't matter who wins in the end. I kind of like that. Each turn is like deciding what you want to do around Istanbul that day..."Oh I quite fancy popping into the mosque/post-office", "Let me see what I can get for these rings at the large market, today".



Istanbul looks really good - I think it won the Kennerspiel des Jahres for last year.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Corporate whore » 12 Jan 2015, 08:51

Istanbul is a neat game, lots to think about without being brain burning. I think the worker drop-off/collection may be a mechanism I've not seen before.

Currently enjoying Historia, which is a progress/development game. A bit dry but with multiple pathways to win. also Nations the dice game- all the angst of full fat Nations in only 20 minutes.
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Corporate whore » 12 Jan 2015, 08:53

And last weekend we played Steam for the first time in a long time. Glad to report that I still 'have it'!
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Zeke » 12 Jan 2015, 19:17

Got several new (to me) games over the holidays: Imperial, Bruxelles 1893 (which I'd already played several times), Neuland, Roll for the Galaxy, Locomotive Werks, German Railways, Castles of Mad King Ludwig, Container and some others.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Ray K. » 13 Jan 2015, 16:19

Just picked up and play tested Takenoko yesterday. The ladies are going to love it I think.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 16 Jan 2015, 11:38

Was scrabbling around the internet looking for an X-Wing Millennium Falcon. Snared one but they're virtually sold out and the figures are selling on Ebay for £45 or so already.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby martha » 16 Jan 2015, 21:19

Yeah I gave up on that pursuit.
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BCB CUP 2017 is on!
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 17 Jan 2015, 12:36

NFL team Green Bay Packers are obsessed with Settlers of Catan

http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-packers ... 1421346102

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Ray K. » 18 Jan 2015, 13:50

Oh Martha Red Dragon Inn looks like a hoot. I can see my ladies digging it. On my list.

I've recently picked up Small World for my ipad to see if I'd like the board game itself and see if my girls liked it (I've done this a few times and they usually pester me to pick up the real deal). Anyway I think I like it but, damn it, I suck. I pulled of one win (think it more fortuitous than skill though). Mostly I have the smallest pile of coins at the end.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Corporate whore » 19 Jan 2015, 15:56

Have you tried Stone Age? The iPad app is decent, though I prefer to play the real thing.
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Ray K. » 20 Jan 2015, 14:52

I haven't. I'll look it up. Right now my i-pad rotation is Small World, Lords of Waterdeep and Carcassonne (which is still probably the game I play most with my girls) plus a couple of war games. The girls also have Whoiwasit? on the i-pad as well. I bought the board game for one of their friend's birthdays and they dug it - found the app and it's something they both like.

And Red Dragon Inn is being delivered today.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 20 Jan 2015, 16:30

Over Xmas I had a discussion friends of mine about Euro boardgames and we came to the conclusion that they are the prog-rock of the gaming world. There's a lot of similarities between Prog and Euros I reckon - that same level of relatively closed off conviviality between its adherents and sniffiness about "less complex" games.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Corporate whore » 20 Jan 2015, 17:32

Surely Civilisation, 18xx and monster wargames like Totalerkreig are the Prog of the gaming world?

Go on for a long time, are totally engrossing for the congnacenti, and totally baffling to everyone else?
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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 22 Jan 2015, 11:18

My copy of Mushroom Eaters finally arrived. Can't wait to play it.

Nate Hayden’s The Mushroom Eaters is a very limited release from micropublisher Blast City Games. You might remember Mr. Hayden from the ravishingly grim black metal brawl Cave Evil from a couple of years ago. He’s shifted gears with this release, producing one of the most profound, transcendental gaming experiences I have ever had in a lifetime of playing games. When I call this game “challenging”, I don’t mean that it’s tough to beat or that the rules are complex. I mean that its theme and the way the subject matter engages the player is especially demanding and in a way that isn’t just rare in the games medium- it’s almost nonexistent. I don’t know that I’ve ever played a more provocative and daring game that risks everything- including core notions of “fun” and “competition”- to illustrate what is ultimately a journey of the mind, body and spirit. And yes, this game is about tripping on psychedelic mushrooms as the title suggests.

Before you read further, let me make it clear that this is in no way a game about getting fucked up on drugs and freaking out, man. This is not a game for hippies, pothead dropouts, acid casualties or tweakers. This is a game where the goal is to use the language of its medium to communicate a ritualistic, shamanic psychonautical experience and the changes that the individual goes through in a trip that goes through some very intimate, internal spaces yet is shared with a group. It is about the personal thought processes, the physical experiences and spiritual revelations that occur. Along the way, maybe you’ll notice that the room is getting too cold. Maybe you’ll throw up or start giggling. Maybe you’ll reflect on the Great Paradox and what it means for both the self and the other. The atmosphere this game creates feels real, alive, vital. Yet its tone is cryptic, mysterious and religious.

The Mushroom Eaters is as much a game about breathing, sharing and feeling the rhythm of an imaginary shaman’s imaginary drum tapping out a beat while you lock into a mantra and focus your mind as it is about anything to do with psylocibin. It comes across as a holistic experience that is abstract yet with the player imparting meaning to the abstractions and developing an interior dialogue with the signifiers the game is offering. There’s even a track gauging your nervous system throughout the trip- a level of detail that feels almost like something out of a Phil Eklund game. I’ve never taken any kind of psychedelic in my life, but this game made me understand more about the experience and their use in spiritual traditions than I ever have before.

Needless to say, there has never been a game like this, at least when approached as a complete work. Mechanically, the game is quite simple and maybe even cloyingly familiar. Despite the esoteric theme it’s not entirely unlike Knizia’s Lord of the Rings game, where players play cards to move a common pawn along a path, triggering action spaces along the way. Or they may diverge from the main path and contend with personal issues, revelations, discoveries or insights. There are resource and hand management elements, wooden cubes and dice, but talking about the nuts and bolts of this game feels almost trivial.

It is primarily a cooperative experience as players represent apprentices to a shaman that are partaking of the ritual mushrooms. The collective goal is to progress together through the ritual. The only real conflict or opposition is the dichotomy between benefiting the group or the self. At the end of the ritual a new shaman is to be determined so there is a “winner” but it’s not quite like winning other games. The game is soundly designed, but it is the context and the fine connections to thematic material that make what are quite common gameplay elements seem completely fresh, new and almost alien. When you are playing this game, even rolling a die or playing a card feels like learning a new way of using a word you already know. This is a game that is rewriting syntax, rewriting the way that we understand games to communicate their themes.

Oh, and it also comes with 3D glasses.

Yes, there is a 3D element to the game. It isn’t a “comin’ at ya” kind of silly gimmick. The glasses, when worn, make the board crackle with visual energy. When the path leads to moments of intensity, those spots on the board might just be illustrations of a fireball but with the glasses on, they’re searingly, electrically hot. I’m reluctant to spoil one of this game’s most incredible ideas, but the board actually unfolds to reveal new panels as the game progresses, becoming more and more psychedelic and vibrantly illustrated as you move toward the end of the ritual. You’re going to want to wear the glasses. I’ve never seen anything like what this board does. It’s absolutely genius.

When I opened this game, I had no idea what was going on with that insane board but nonetheless I was completely blown away. Finally, here was a game that had actual artwork instead of illustrations. Cards were covered with scribbled pencil illustrations on notebook paper, surrealist multimedia collages, DIY photocopied pictures and about a hundred other things that most board game publishers would never in a million years OK for publication. It is truly a work of art, raw and exhilarating to look at in a way that games almost never are.

For all of my praise- this is personally one of the most important games that I have ever played- let me be clear about something directly connected to the style of this game as well as its subject matter. The Mushroom Eaters is not a game for everyone and in fact I would be very reluctant to recommend it to all but a very, very small number of people that I believe would appreciate the more esoteric and obscure elements of it. It is not exactly a game to get the gang together over for a hootin’ and hollerin’ good time and for many gamers if the artwork doesn’t put them off then either a misunderstanding of the “drugs” theme or the way it either completely ignores or reframes typical gameplay elements will.mushroom eaters cover

Yet I find myself thinking that everyone designing games should take a look at what Mr. Hayden is doing here with theme, getting to a deeper level of intellectual (and possibly spiritual) engagement than just using a setting or environment to tell a cool genre story. No dungeons, no dragons, no zombies, no space marines and absolutely no miniatures. This is a game about a human experience at a very deep psychic level. Mr. Hayden has realized the potential of games to express something other than conflict, resource management, or other material agendas. This is a message that everyone in gaming ought to hear.

But there again, I’m frankly glad that it is such a tiny game that only a few people will get to play. It’s just not intended for a mass audience and it boldly makes no concession to mainstream appeal. If the big publishers are like the major studios putting out the summer blockbusters at the local megaplex where you go on Friday night with your friends, this game is the Jodorowsky film playing down at the tiny, broke-down art theater where you’ve had your greatest epiphanies of what film can be. I hate to play the “most people won’t get it” card, but there it is on the table. If you are one of the people who might get it, then The Mushroom Eaters could be a very, very special game for you.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Toby » 02 Apr 2015, 07:36

Some new additions

Elysium - 7 Wonders style game of set collecting with a mythic Greek context. Easier to teach than 7 Wonders too. I like it a lot.

Dead of Winter - semi co-op with betrayal mechanic Zombie apocalypse game. Really good, if bloody difficult.

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Re: NEW Boardgames thread

Postby Corporate whore » 07 Apr 2015, 18:48

Finally got to play Glass Road last week, excellent.

It's a 'typical' Uwe Rosenburg game in many ways, but much slicker in its mechanisms that the other.

I'm also enjoying Quartermaster General. All the 'fun' of WW II in 75 minutes. And unusually it plays faster with lots of players than with just two.
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