New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Graham Murakami
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Re: New now reading

Postby Graham Murakami » 27 Dec 2018, 21:23

Snarfyguy wrote:Image

I find his work by turns exasperating and captivating.


If you managed to get through #1 and #2, the third and fourth ones should be a treat - much more of a linear story and loads of music references that you just don't get in any of the other possible best authors in the world.

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Still Baron
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Re: New now reading

Postby Still Baron » 29 Dec 2018, 11:46

I just finished re-reading Wuthering Heights. It’s a crazy book and I really didn’t remember at least half of it!

On to Mary Barton, which I hope to finish before we fly home as I want to read some crime fiction Kid P hipped me to on the flight ...
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Belle Lettre
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Re: New now reading

Postby Belle Lettre » 29 Dec 2018, 11:56

"Broadsword Calling Danny Boy". I laughed a good deal.
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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 29 Dec 2018, 20:40

Image

A book which is trying to capture the essence of daily existence in Berlin during WWII.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Diamond Dog
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 01 Jan 2019, 12:51

Diamond Dog wrote:Now onto :

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Which is good (dealing with one individual per year during 55-94) but I can't help but feel that is was an exercise in filling a gap for Hepworth, with very little depth in any of the chapters (because there are so many of them). A good enough read but I'm not sure it would tell any of us on BCB one single thing we weren't already aware of.


And when it has blazing historical inaccuracies throughout (Led Zeppelin's debut album was apparently one of the musical highlights of 1968...which is interesting as it wasn't released until 1969, for instance) I gave up on it as lazy, copy-and-paste 'journalism'.

Just started this :

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Which has this as its blurb:

If you thought Wall Street was about alpha males standing in trading pits hollering at each other, think again. That world is dead.

Now, the world's money is traded by computer code, inside black boxes in heavily guarded buildings. Even the experts entrusted with your cash don't know what's happening to it. And the very few who do aren't about to tell - because they're making a killing.

This is a market that's rigged, out of control and out of sight; a market in which the chief need is for speed; and in which traders would sell their grandmothers for a microsecond. Blink, and you'll miss it.

In Flash Boys, Michael Lewis tells the explosive story of how one group of ingenious oddballs and misfits set out to expose what was going on. It's the story of what it's like to declare war on some of the richest and most powerful people in the world. It's about taking on an entire system. And it's about the madness that has taken hold of the financial markets today.

You won't believe it until you've read it.


And it's all true besides that last sentence, because it's all too believable to most of us, I'm sure.

A really great read so far. I like Lewis' style, and his varied topics (his book on American Football phenom Michael Oher is a fantastic write up of the subject).
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Jimbo
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 03 Jan 2019, 01:42

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Cold War Number One: 70 years of daily national stupidity. Cold War Number Two: Still in its youth, but just as stupid. - William Blum

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harvey k-tel
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Re: New now reading

Postby harvey k-tel » 03 Jan 2019, 13:56

Just started this last night:

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Six String
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Re: New now reading

Postby Six String » 03 Jan 2019, 20:33

harvey k-tel wrote:Just started this last night:

Image


One of my favorite books of 2018. Rebecca has said several times that it has changed her life, particularly chapter five. I'm a big fan of the author anyway and he did something here I wasn't sure would be possible.

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Toby
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Re: New now reading

Postby Toby » 04 Jan 2019, 08:03

On my list to read that one.

Just started on this behemoth

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And along with that, a resolution in 2019 to start at the beginning of English literature..

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Minnie the Minx
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Re: New now reading

Postby Minnie the Minx » 04 Jan 2019, 12:02

Over December:

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A very personal and moving account of how the author dealt with the deteriorating health of her parents in a society that doesn't care to discuss the inevitable path of growing old and the decisions that humans make, or are allowed to make in the face of medicine. Heart stopping at times, laugh out loud at others.

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Adam Kay's hilarious and poignant diaries of the life and career of an NHS doctor. I recognised almost everything he discussed, in particular the emotional labour and burnout to exhaustion in a system ill equipped to deal with the mental health of its staff.

Finally, a book I didn't expect to enjoy:

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I picked this up in a rush to read on the flight. Snobbily, I tend to avoid anything recommended by any "book club" for reasons I would struggle to explain but I had heard a lot of people saying how much they enjoyed it. I opened it on the plane and was still staring at it as the bags came round on the carousel and finished it in one sitting. What an extraordinary book - brimming over with gentle detail and a wonderful tribute to the power of kindness. Reading back what I have written just now, I can see that it doesn't do the book any justice at all. It is an amazing piece of work.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Six String » 04 Jan 2019, 18:19

Rebecca is reading the Gail Honeyman book now.

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Minnie the Minx
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Re: New now reading

Postby Minnie the Minx » 04 Jan 2019, 21:59

Six String wrote:Rebecca is reading the Gail Honeyman book now.


I will be really interested to know what she thinks of it! It’s actually very ‘British’ in that a lot of the minor details are in the mundanity of everyday life and there are a lot of British brands and customs discussed so if you need a translator just holler!
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Re: New now reading

Postby Six String » 04 Jan 2019, 23:31

I wasn't aware of any of that. She brought it over the other day and mentioned she had just started it. I'll enquire more tomorrow when she comes over.

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 08 Jan 2019, 09:33

Minnie Mincepie wrote:Image

Adam Kay's hilarious and poignant diaries of the life and career of an NHS doctor. I recognised almost everything he discussed, in particular the emotional labour and burnout to exhaustion in a system ill equipped to deal with the mental health of its staff.

My wife started reading that yesterday, after someone at work lent her a copy. She's been in the NHS for 20+ years, albeit from the admin side rather than patient care, I think there's a lot that resonates with her, too. She annoyed me no end by snorting with laughter at random occasions throughout the evening.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 08 Jan 2019, 09:36

I loved my rare foray into history with Berlin at War, it's not often you think of the horrors of German citizens suffering under Nazi rule, but especially towards the end of the war life sounded pretty horrific. 4,000 registered suicides in Berlin in April 1945 alone, and the figures for rape by Soviet troops were horrific.

Anyway, onto more pleasant subject matter, and safer, more familiar ground for me:

Image
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Deebank » 08 Jan 2019, 10:41

Darkness_Fish wrote:I loved my rare foray into history with Berlin at War, it's not often you think of the horrors of German citizens suffering under Nazi rule, but especially towards the end of the war life sounded pretty horrific. 4,000 registered suicides in Berlin in April 1945 alone, and the figures for rape by Soviet troops were horrific.


I've mentioned it before on here but years ago I was sent a memoir written by a german chap who was a senior figure in the packaging industry and I worked on a magazine in that sector at the time.

In the book amongst the many packaging-based anecdotes he relates his wartime experiences. As s a teenager he was drafted into an anti-aircraft battery. One day they had to move their AA gun to the other side of the village they were based in. Transport was limited so the young future can maker 'borrowed' a wheel barrow from a garden to move some of the ammunition. As bad luck would have it some SS or Gestapo pitched up as they were getting set up. They asked who had looted the barrow. Just as he was about to own up to the 'crime' his sergeant (an old WW1 veteran IIRC) said that it was he who had pinched it. The SS strung him up from a lamp post. Grim and made all the grimmer by the 'matter of fact' way the story was told.
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Still Baron
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Re: New now reading

Postby Still Baron » 09 Jan 2019, 04:39

Carrying on with my travel through 19C Brit Lit, it was Elizabeth Gaskell’s “Mary Barton,” which was a curious book, but one I enjoyed and trucked through during the end of the XMAS holidays. It is a little cumbersome and unwieldy, shifting back and forth from working class polemic (from a Christian viewpoint) to improbable pot boiler, but I suppose it was an early effort and fascinating in that regard.

I look forward to the improvement of this genre to come ... alas, I have some pressing deadlines for work so the reading will come to a crawl for most of the rest of winter and spring.
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take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.

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Re: New now reading

Postby mentalist (slight return) » 09 Jan 2019, 12:24

Stille Baron wrote:Carrying on with my travel through 19C Brit Lit, it was Elizabeth Gaskell’s “Mary Barton,” which was a curious book, but one I enjoyed and trucked through during the end of the XMAS holidays. It is a little cumbersome and unwieldy, shifting back and forth from working class polemic (from a Christian viewpoint) to improbable pot boiler, but I suppose it was an early effort and fascinating in that regard.

I look forward to the improvement of this genre to come ... alas, I have some pressing deadlines for work so the reading will come to a crawl for most of the rest of winter and spring.

I'd suggest Fanny Hill next. Ooo err missus.
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Jimbo
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 09 Jan 2019, 14:15

mentalist (slight return) wrote:
Stille Baron wrote:Carrying on with my travel through 19C Brit Lit, it was Elizabeth Gaskell’s “Mary Barton,” which was a curious book, but one I enjoyed and trucked through during the end of the XMAS holidays. It is a little cumbersome and unwieldy, shifting back and forth from working class polemic (from a Christian viewpoint) to improbable pot boiler, but I suppose it was an early effort and fascinating in that regard.

I look forward to the improvement of this genre to come ... alas, I have some pressing deadlines for work so the reading will come to a crawl for most of the rest of winter and spring.

I'd suggest Fanny Hill next. Ooo err missus.


Better yet, Erica Jong's Fanny. A hoot and a half!
Cold War Number One: 70 years of daily national stupidity. Cold War Number Two: Still in its youth, but just as stupid. - William Blum

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 14 Jan 2019, 10:56

Image
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.