New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 04 Aug 2018, 23:50

never/ever wrote:https://mma.napubcoonline.com/cgi-bin/mma?a=cl&cl=CL1&sp=TRA&ai=1&e=-------en-20-CRE-1--txt-txIN-creem-------1---

This is brilliant!

NR- Trans Oceanic Trouser Press October 1977

Holy bananas, that was my favorite thing when I was a teen. Still got the whole set in a closet somewhere. Thanks!!!
Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

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Diamond Dog
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 09 Aug 2018, 12:49

echolalia wrote:Image

The looks, styles and products of the world’s first-ever consumer boom (1955-65). It covers architecture, interior design, cars, labour-saving appliances, nuclear fallout shelters etc. It’s fascinating, if you like this kind of thing.

The illustrations are great – some of them amazing. The adverts for the products were often more interesting than the products themselves.

It’s well-written and quite witty in places. You can tell Hines loves his subject deeply, and nothing is too trivial to mention. One innovation of the populuxe period, apparently, was the corrugated potato chip, whose form was borrowed from structural engineering, the idea being to make it stronger and therefore able to scoop up more dip. But that’s an exception – in most instances the look was pure styling, with no practical function. Not that it was empty – it embodied a “fantasy”, usually a positive and optimistic perspective on the future.

The dominant visual motifs were borrowed from jet planes and rockets (most manufacturers of consumer goods were also military contractors). Stuff was curvy yet angular – both acute and obtuse, as exemplified in the “leaning forward” look that appeared in cars in about 1957. Rectangles which were perfectly happy just to sit there became parallelograms, itching to go where they were pointing. The tailfins tend to attract more attention but there was plenty of evolution at the front ends of cars too, such as the introduction of useless conical protuberances synechdochically termed dagmars after the actress of the same name. Some fronts are really beautiful – chrome bumpers that break forward and backward with the voluptuous rhythms of a Borromini façade. But not all designs were successful and one model with a curiously-shaped radiator grille was especially unloved – “like a great gaping minge bearing down on me,” as one English visitor described it.

The ability of a design element to embody meaning sometimes determined its inclusion even at the expense of functionality. He’s quite close to Americana-loving French intellectuals like Barthes and Baudrillard in his semiological approach here. So push buttons became ubiquitous features on household appliances during the period, often when a dial would have done the job better, such as setting the temperature on a washing machine or whatever. Maybe the appeal of buttons lay in their binariness and the way this prefigured the “digital” age. It was a terrible decade for the rheostat, anyway.

I want a formica-topped blob table now!


Great review from you there Echo... I bought this on the back of it and it lives up to all you posted.

A really good overview of the subject (consumerism from 53-65) which, if you have any love of the subject, you really ought to get hold of.
The undefined being negotiated by the unprepared in order to get the unspecified for the uninformed.

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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 09 Aug 2018, 17:14

^^^ I'm sold, except the paperback edition is weirdly more expensive than the hardcover. (I prefer the paperback format -it's smaller and lighter.)
Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 09 Aug 2018, 21:40

Image

A book that Jeremy Corbyn AND Boris Johnson can get behind.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 09 Aug 2018, 21:42

Image
“He’s got the memory of an elephant ... and the trophy cabinet of one too.”

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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 14 Aug 2018, 14:27

Image

A panoramic, Tom Wolfe/Dickens kind of thing, taking place in NYC 1976/77. I recalled a good review, so I grabbed it at half-price.

I see that one critic called it "the kind of exuberant, Zeitgeisty New York novel, like The Bonfire of the Vanities or The Goldfinch, that you’ll either love, hate, or pretend to have read," while another called it "overhyped" and "a steaming pile of literary dung." LOL

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_on_F ... berg_novel)
Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 14 Aug 2018, 14:35

Image

Deeper and deeper into the rabbit hole … :?
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