New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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mentalist (slight return)
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Re: New now reading

Postby mentalist (slight return) » 06 Jan 2018, 01:51

Nick wrote:
mentalist (slight return) wrote:Been getting universally positive recommendations on this for the past year or two, so here we go

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I liked that a lot, best new novel I've read in a while.


It was great. I flew through it. A bit Moby Dick.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Copehead » 06 Jan 2018, 03:46

mentalist (slight return) wrote:
Nick wrote:
mentalist (slight return) wrote:Been getting universally positive recommendations on this for the past year or two, so here we go

Image


I liked that a lot, best new novel I've read in a while.


It was great. I flew through it. A bit Moby Dick.


Lot of flu going about
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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 06 Jan 2018, 08:42

Two on the go...


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The Happy Mondays were disqualified from a special edition of the BBC’s Bargain Hunt after Bez broke the show’s rules by artificially inflating prices, handing victory to Pulp.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Toby » 06 Jan 2018, 12:30

The Tom Holland translation of Herodotus is well worth a go as well, and the Landmark edition is utterly fabulous (it has loads of maps).

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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 06 Jan 2018, 13:13

Toby wrote:The Tom Holland translation of Herodotus is well worth a go as well, and the Landmark edition is utterly fabulous (it has loads of maps).

Thanks, Toby. I'm enjoying the Oxford World Classics version above, with its copious footnotes. It even has lines of discussion of some aspects of translation which my Greek is not good enough to comprehend, but is interesting nonetheless.
The Happy Mondays were disqualified from a special edition of the BBC’s Bargain Hunt after Bez broke the show’s rules by artificially inflating prices, handing victory to Pulp.

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Re: New now reading

Postby wannabee enfant terrible » 06 Jan 2018, 13:19

The Letters of William S Burroughs 1945-1959

Cheers Secret Santa 8-)
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 06 Jan 2018, 18:21

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Very enjoyable.
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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 06 Jan 2018, 22:09

Toby wrote:Image

The translation is tiresome but helps with my woeful Latin efforts.

I have a few of those Loeb editions, including the Virgil. I suppose to be fair to the translators the facing-page translations are designed to serve as a crutch to readers who are Latin-enabled to a greater or lesser degree and are looking to understand/appreciate the original. But yes, in the case of Virgil the poetry doesn’t survive the crossing from the even-numbered to the odd-numbered pages. Every new page brings a fresh ferry disaster. Having said that I read the Loeb Apuleius (The Golden Ass) and although the syntax is much less gnarly than Virgil the Latin was still mostly beyond me and I ended up sticking to the English, and it was riotously funny in places. So someone was doing something right. Good luck with your Latin-learning!

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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 08 Jan 2018, 01:38

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A very handsome edition: hardcover with heavy laminated paper, nice layout and illustrations and good text by one of the principals. Not life-changing, but a nice addition to the lore.

On edit: a lot of this book is taken up with accounts of the author's travels to NYC and California in the late 60s, where he arranges for and records spoken word sessions for the likes of Michael McClure, Charles Bukowski and Allen Ginsberg (along with support from jazz luminaries such as Mingus and Elvin Jones), ostensibly for the fledgling label under discussion. These activities only marginally have anything to do with The Beatles, but they're pretty interesting in their own right.

Much of the rest depicts the decline of Apple Records with the arrival of Allen Klein, which is handled in substantially more detail in Richard DeLillo's The Longest Cocktail Party.

NR:

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Re: New now reading

Postby mentalist (slight return) » 12 Jan 2018, 08:09

Finished Ferrante 1, My Brilliant Friend. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Have started Ferrante 2, The Story Of A New Name.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Velvis » 12 Jan 2018, 18:20

Right now:

Grant by Ron Chernow
The Familiar Vol. 3 by Mark Z. Danielewski
Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
a gibbon running freely

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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 13 Jan 2018, 09:14

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James Lee Burke is a terrific writer with more similes than something with a lot of similes. And I love the hard boiled Texas novel genre but one thing I don't care for is the appearance of another serial killer. I like Elmore Leonard because his bad guys were thieves and shysters with actual motives. But Burke's characters and settings are as well etched as other well etched things. I am happy to find this writer as he has many books but if each succeeding book has a serial killer I will quit him like I quit other things.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Minnie Cheddars » 16 Jan 2018, 15:25

Currently reading John Keay's 'India - a History'. It's beautifully written, but a bit hard to focus on early into the book as in the absence of names and events and only working on archeological clues I find it hard to 'cement' myself to the ideas. I'm looking forward to later in the book where there is more 'tangible' history to go at.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Minnie Cheddars » 16 Jan 2018, 15:29

That's my lounge reading. My bedside reading is the Man Who Sold The World by Peter Doggett and I'm loving dipping in and out.
I have just bought a ton of books with birthday vouchers - I'm going to have a shit load of stuff to get through this year. I hope I manage to get through 'Leaving the 20th Century' better than I did the first time around but then this time I don't have to write down my thoughts about it and present it to the weekly meeting of comrades. Hopefully Baron won't subject me to the same scrutiny.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 16 Jan 2018, 17:13

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Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 17 Jan 2018, 13:32

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It was going for a song on Amazon. I’m only about 40 pages in and I’m enjoying it so far. Basically it’s a collection of testimonials by members/survivors of Fassbinder’s inner circle. Ulli Lommel is the only glaring omission that I can see. Great title!

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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 17 Jan 2018, 14:08

Jimbo wrote:Image

I don't care for is the appearance of another serial killer.


About two thirds through and this book's serial killer is turning out to be a much more complex and interesting character than I had thought he would be. Violent, dark, explicit, it's turning out to be a hard boiled masterpiece.
Some say the glass is half-empty others half-full. I say. "Lemme see that glass!"

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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 27 Jan 2018, 09:31

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I'm now into my second James Lee Burke book. The previous book was really good but the ending, while impactful kind of sneaked up on me and was less satisfying than I'd expected. This new one is set in Texas as well featuring the father of the last book's hero. The story is so far compelling and I am excited to get back to it after a put down for some hours.

While choosing contemporary novels I tend to consider the technology the characters use, especially when it comes to the internet and computers. Stories from olden days can't get the technology wrong. What was was. If the story takes place now sometimes there is a clunkiness when it comes to cell phone and computer usage. Does that make sense?
Some say the glass is half-empty others half-full. I say. "Lemme see that glass!"

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Re: New now reading

Postby Ray K. » 29 Jan 2018, 17:02

Copehead wrote:Anyone given these a go:

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Surely a made up name due to similarity to Lovecraft ?

2 for just over £6 on kindle and given a good review in the guardian end of year round up.


I have some Holmes/Lovecraft book I read a number of years ago.... I don't think it was one of these. It was through one of those Sci-Fi/Fantasy book clubs so maybe it's a different packaging. I'll have to look at it when I get home... I can't recall the actual title at the moment.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Wally Bingbang » 29 Jan 2018, 18:16

Just about to wrap this one up:

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Antrim's a pretty great writer. This one's about a group of psychology professors and trainees who go out for dinner together at a pancake restaurant, during which, the protagonist, Tom, has an odd, um, 'episode' and winds up flying around the restaurant, mostly observing, and sometimes interacting with the other characters. It's a bit crazy.
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