New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 13 Dec 2016, 13:15

Velvis wrote:
Darkness_Fish wrote:
Velvis wrote:
I just grabbed Annihilation.

Have you ever read anything by him before? I only discovered today that Finch is the 3rd in a series, and given the odd concept, it supposedly helps a lot to have read the first two.


Never read him before. But the word has been good on the Southern Reach trilogy for a couple years now.

I finished this last night. It was hard going at first, I haven't read much sci-fi for years, and I found the setting and different classes of being (human/strange-mushroom overlords/half n half) really quite off-putting. At it's heart though, it's just a hard-boiled detective-noir set in a dystopian future, with three or four different tribes of people trying to survive and dominate. The language and imagery is superb, I just wish there'd have been a bit more depth to some of the characters (I seem to be reading a lot of male writers who have no idea that females have personality and character too), and a bit less fungus.
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Phil T

Re: New now reading

Postby Phil T » 13 Dec 2016, 13:18

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 16 Dec 2016, 10:23

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northernsky
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Re: New now reading

Postby northernsky » 22 Dec 2016, 12:09

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Well, now. That was monumentally fucking brutal. Men in a dying industry driving themselves beyond any reasonable limit of pain and endurance to stave off poverty for one more year. And doing beastly things to one another along the way. And yet all but one have some kind of ethical grounding, however deeply buried or debased. So despite all their resourcefulness and cunning, they are utterly helpless at the hands of the harpooner, a figure of pure malevolence who simply seizes what he needs, entirely free of compunction. Something between the Nietzchean antihero of The Sea-Wolf and Cormac McCarthy's implacable doom-dealers. This is not as good a novel as any of those, but it is horribly gripping and written with a beautiful economy.

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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 22 Dec 2016, 14:15

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Wonderful stuff. Brilliant wordplay.
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Jimbo
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 22 Dec 2016, 15:08

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Just finished this, book 10 and probably the last of the series. Man that was good audio book listening!

Next up is this.

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pcqgod
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Re: New now reading

Postby pcqgod » 22 Dec 2016, 15:14

"Black Elk Speaks"

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Velvis
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Re: New now reading

Postby Velvis » 22 Dec 2016, 15:23

northernsky wrote:Image

Well, now. That was monumentally fucking brutal. Men in a dying industry driving themselves beyond any reasonable limit of pain and endurance to stave off poverty for one more year. And doing beastly things to one another along the way. And yet all but one have some kind of ethical grounding, however deeply buried or debased. So despite all their resourcefulness and cunning, they are utterly helpless at the hands of the harpooner, a figure of pure malevolence who simply seizes what he needs, entirely free of compunction. Something between the Nietzchean antihero of The Sea-Wolf and Cormac McCarthy's implacable doom-dealers. This is not as good a novel as any of those, but it is horribly gripping and written with a beautiful economy.


Next on my list.
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echolalia
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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 22 Dec 2016, 22:18

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I was hoping to love this book but merely enjoyed it – but enough to order her next one, Slow Days, Fast Company. I thought I recognized Gram Parsons (she changes some names) and a quick web search seemed to corroborate this.

In my case however it’s Slow Days, Even Slower Parcel Company so in the meantime I read:

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It has three sections: Mosque, Caves, Temple. Christianity is playing away from home here, and in an unlit cave echoes take the place of shadows and the G&T crowd from the Club mistakes these echoes for acts, of a devious nature – like the old biddy complaining about the builders whistling a dirty song – and in an outbreak of collective hysteria fastens on the occurrence as an opportunity to vindicate their own racial prejudices.

Still no Eve, so I’m now kicking off with

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 28 Dec 2016, 10:57

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northernsky
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Re: New now reading

Postby northernsky » 28 Dec 2016, 14:10

Christness_Fish wrote:Rather Be The Devil


I read all the Rebus books pretty much as they come out; this one felt pretty tired, I thought, despite the benefit of having Cafferty back on full gas. Considerably weaker than the other "post-pension" books.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 28 Dec 2016, 14:37

northernsky wrote:
Christness_Fish wrote:Rather Be The Devil


I read all the Rebus books pretty much as they come out; this one felt pretty tired, I thought, despite the benefit of having Cafferty back on full gas. Considerably weaker than the other "post-pension" books.

Hmm, I'm only just starting it, to be honest, but I don't feel that it's starting out firing on all cylinders. Rebus opening another cold case at random, and Malcolm Fox is a character that Rankin seems to be sticking with, but doesn't know what to do with. Some time back, even pre-pension, he seemed to get a bit stuck with Rebus, and focused more heavily on Siobhan Clarke, and it feels to me that would be a better direction for him to head in.

Still, it's been a long time since I read a Rankin novel I didn't like, so I'm sure it'll be at least a pleasant diversion.
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the masked man
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Re: New now reading

Postby the masked man » 02 Jan 2017, 19:26

Finished this early this morning:

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Samuel Bjork is seemingly the new kid on the Scandi-crime block. A Norwegian writer whose characterisation owes quite a bit to Stieg Larsson, it has to be said. Nonetheless, he spins a decent tale in this, the first of a projected series. The book starts quietly if intriguing, making it clear that both protagonists have a significant and disastrous past leaving one of them demoted and the other contemplating suicide. Yet their collected talents are needed back in Oslo when a series of ritualistic child murders are uncovered. Could this have something to do with a sinister Christian cult based outside the city, or are more basic themes of revenge at play? The translation is clear and crisp, while the tension ramps up nicely towards the end. This series is worth watching out for.

Now, casting my net wider when it comes to translated crime fiction, here's a notable German hit novel that I've just started:

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Nele Neuhaus' originally self-published novel became a literary phenomenon in Europe, and reads well so far. Her novel focuses on a young man recently released from prison for the murder of a young woman which he is seemingly innocent of, only to discover the extent to which his parents have suffered as a result of this incident. It's clear at this early that one of her persuasive themes is the suffocating nature of a small-minded village community. This is uncomfortable but compelling reading so far.

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Velvis
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Re: New now reading

Postby Velvis » 02 Jan 2017, 19:58

Rereading Watchmen. I still am finding new bits of cleverness.
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Graham Murakami
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Re: New now reading

Postby Graham Murakami » 02 Jan 2017, 20:10

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Julian Maclaren-Ross is noteworthy for his life as well as his writing since he was X Trapnel in Antony Powell's Dance to the Music of Time, for example, as well as an enigmatic guest on a 60s chat-show. I am always told that his short stories are possibly his best work, but this is a great novel and a treat to re-read while convalescing over the new year. It hints at wider themes such as love, poverty, politics and impending war but is really just a perfectly written autobiographical sketch.

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Graham Murakami
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Re: New now reading

Postby Graham Murakami » 02 Jan 2017, 20:17

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Has anybody tried reading this? I am not convinced you are meant to. There are 100 pages of words between the lovely covers with the great joke, but the first few pages don't make any sense really.

On the other hand, this is the finest Christmas stocking book since the Meaning of Liff or the Big Hard Number Two:
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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 02 Jan 2017, 23:42

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Still Baron
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Re: New now reading

Postby Still Baron » 03 Jan 2017, 08:14

echolalia wrote:Image

I was hoping to love this book but merely enjoyed it – but enough to order her next one, Slow Days, Fast Company. I thought I recognized Gram Parsons (she changes some names) and a quick web search seemed to corroborate this.


I had the same view, basically. I've just started Slow Days. Erstwhile BCBer mspecktor wrote the introduction to Slow Days and had suggested to me that it is the better book. A (short) chapter or two in and I'm hopeful.
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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 03 Jan 2017, 09:14

Darkness_Fish wrote:
northernsky wrote:
Christness_Fish wrote:Rather Be The Devil


I read all the Rebus books pretty much as they come out; this one felt pretty tired, I thought, despite the benefit of having Cafferty back on full gas. Considerably weaker than the other "post-pension" books.

Hmm, I'm only just starting it, to be honest, but I don't feel that it's starting out firing on all cylinders. Rebus opening another cold case at random, and Malcolm Fox is a character that Rankin seems to be sticking with, but doesn't know what to do with. Some time back, even pre-pension, he seemed to get a bit stuck with Rebus, and focused more heavily on Siobhan Clarke, and it feels to me that would be a better direction for him to head in.

Still, it's been a long time since I read a Rankin novel I didn't like, so I'm sure it'll be at least a pleasant diversion.

Hmm, I'm not sure I agree with it being tired, I think it was probably as good as the other post-pension Rebus books. The only real downsides are the practical irrelevance of the cold case, and the incongruity of Rebus being so heavily involved with the investigation. Otherwise, it's a pretty good addition to the collection. It does make me wonder where Rebus is going to go, though, he can't keep tagging along with the real cops, surely?
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 03 Jan 2017, 09:17

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A mammoth door-stop of a book from the writer and director of Withnail & I. Seems to be a very aggressive book so far, his hatred of Victorian society is clear, perhaps too clear, but it appears to be hugely well researched.
Saving my holier-than-thou nonsense for a more deserving cause since '82