New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Robert
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Re: New now reading

Postby Robert » 04 Sep 2018, 22:49

Did anyone here read ‘A little Life’ ?

Interested about opinions

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echolalia
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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 10 Sep 2018, 00:30

Diamond Dog wrote:
echolalia wrote:Image



Great review from you there Echo... I bought this on the back of it and it lives up to all you posted.

A really good overview of the subject (consumerism from 53-65) which, if you have any love of the subject, you really ought to get hold of.

I’m glad you liked it Pete. Strangely enough I was looking at other Thomas Hine titles recently and a typo threw up a different author, Thomas Hines, and now I’ve ordered:

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Neutra appears in Populuxe of course. I was reading the other day that the house (on the cover) he designed for the director Josef von Sternberg was later rented by Ayn Rand while she was in Hollywood stalking King Vidor to make sure no changes were made to the ideologically-approved script of The Fountainhead, which he was filming at the time. She wrote Atlas Shrugged there too – the house has since been knocked down. I find the Rand associations rather unsettling but maybe that’s unfair on Neutra… we shall see. I’m certainly looking forward to reading it, anyway.

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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 10 Sep 2018, 00:38

echolalia wrote:Image

Neutra appears in Populuxe of course. I was reading the other day that the house (on the cover) he designed for the director Josef von Sternberg was later rented by Ayn Rand while she was in Hollywood stalking King Vidor to make sure no changes were made to the ideologically-approved script of The Fountainhead, which he was filming at the time. She wrote Atlas Shrugged there too – the house has since been knocked down. I find the Rand associations rather unsettling but maybe that’s unfair on Neutra… we shall see. I’m certainly looking forward to reading it, anyway.

I guess if you wrote The Fountainhead and you were in Hollywood stalking King Vidor to make sure no changes were made to your ideologically-approved script, that would be the house to live in.

Speaking of which,

GoogaMooga wrote: The further away from home you go, the greater the risk of getting stuck there.

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echolalia
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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 10 Sep 2018, 00:48

Snarfyguy wrote:Speaking of which,


:-)

Neutra claimed it was based on him!

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Diamond Dog
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 10 Sep 2018, 05:11

echolalia wrote:I’m glad you liked it Pete. Strangely enough I was looking at other Thomas Hine titles recently and a typo threw up a different author, Thomas Hines, and now I’ve ordered:

Image

Neutra appears in Populuxe of course. I was reading the other day that the house (on the cover) he designed for the director Josef von Sternberg was later rented by Ayn Rand while she was in Hollywood stalking King Vidor to make sure no changes were made to the ideologically-approved script of The Fountainhead, which he was filming at the time. She wrote Atlas Shrugged there too – the house has since been knocked down. I find the Rand associations rather unsettling but maybe that’s unfair on Neutra… we shall see. I’m certainly looking forward to reading it, anyway.


Serendipity!

That looks interesting... I may take a look myself! :)
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 12 Sep 2018, 09:57

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Never saw the film, and after McQueen's tedious art-house hackery in Hunger, I'm not really minded to. This is pretty good so far though.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Jimbo
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 15 Sep 2018, 10:01

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Some say the glass is half-empty others half-full. I say. "Lemme see that glass!"

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 19 Sep 2018, 14:45

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First in a fantasy trilogy by the renowned QC Andrew Caldecott.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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the masked man
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Re: New now reading

Postby the masked man » 24 Sep 2018, 20:31

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The Reunion by Simone van der Vlugt.

Continuing my selection of European crime fiction, this Dutch thriller starts in an unconventional way. Narrated in the first person by 23-year-old Amsterdam resident Sabine, it so far has not featured any real crime elements at all. We learn that Sabine had a stormy teenage relationship with Isobel, her one-time best friend turned deadly enemy, but Isobel disappeared at age 15, and the mystery was never solved. Now Sabine is haunted by flashbacks as she suffers a miserable life, bullied at work and drinking too much. It's so far been a very downbeat character study, and hints are dropped that perhaps Sabine killed Isobel, and has mentally blocked this traumatic memory out. However, I understand there is a surprising twist at the end, so this may be a red herring.

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Toby
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Re: New now reading

Postby Toby » 25 Sep 2018, 11:02

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Roberto Calasso - The Ruin of Kasch

Calasso might be one of my favourite authors. This is dense and impenetrable at times, but like "The Marriage of Cadmus & Harmony" he elucidates such wonderful, unique truths and wisdom that it is worth the slog of around 4-5 pages that I can manage in one sitting.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Tactful Cactus » 25 Sep 2018, 13:34

Darkness_Fish wrote:Never saw the film, and after McQueen's tedious art-house hackery in Hunger, I'm not really minded to. This is pretty good so far though.


You should try it, the film is a fairly conventional narrative. No tedious hackery.

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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 08 Oct 2018, 15:37

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Friedman’s work is most often considered as a contribution to the emergence of “black humor” in American fiction, but his first novel, Stern (1962), could at the time have easily enough been regarded as absurdist, an existential comedy about the angst of Jewish assimilation. The novel’s title character finds himself in alien territory—the American suburbs—confused and beset by a series of humiliations he struggles to understand. The story of his misadventures is funny, but in the way the plays of Beckett and Ionesco are funny, in a detached and deadpan manner that can also be disconcerting.


http://quarterlyconversation.com/the-co ... y-friedman

I came to this entirely via coincidence: I'd confused the author with Josh Alan Friedman (Tales of Times Square, various collaborations with his brother, the cartoonist Drew Friedman). I grabbed a copy of About Harry Townes out of the laundry room -- funny what you find there sometimes -- and it turned out to be great.

Then recently, beloved cartoonist Roz Chast put Stern in a list of her ten favorite books. How could I resist?

http://www.vulture.com/2018/04/roz-chas ... books.html
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Diamond Dog
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 08 Oct 2018, 16:06

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A couple of chapters into this... fascinating read so far.. debunking quite important parts of the origins of Rome, but also taking the time to explain why it couldn't possibly be so and then offering the more likely explanations. What I really like is that when the answer is genuinely "we don't know" then that is the answer provided, instead of running off into the more favoured and exotic hypothesis that has become a major pitfall of many history books I've read lately.
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”

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Snarfyguy
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 15 Oct 2018, 20:28

^^^ Found that bool Populuxe, that you & echolalia were discussing. Four bucks at a flea market, which was nice because Amazon had for way too much money. Looking forward.

Meanwhile,

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GoogaMooga wrote: The further away from home you go, the greater the risk of getting stuck there.

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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 16 Oct 2018, 09:19

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Shriver's terrorism satire, apparently. I'm only 60 or so pages in, so there's remarkably little terrorism yet, but it seems very much a kind of Heart of Darkness meets Gatsby thing so far. Which is pleasant.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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rorebhoy
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Re: New now reading

Postby rorebhoy » 16 Oct 2018, 09:53

Snarfyguy wrote:^^^ Found that bool Populuxe, that you & echolalia were discussing. Four bucks at a flea market, which was nice because Amazon had for way too much money.


I also just got it....from amazon though, d'oh!

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rorebhoy
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Re: New now reading

Postby rorebhoy » 16 Oct 2018, 09:54

Diamond Dog wrote:
A couple of chapters into this... fascinating read so far.. debunking quite important parts of the origins of Rome, but also taking the time to explain why it couldn't possibly be so and then offering the more likely explanations. What I really like is that when the answer is genuinely "we don't know" then that is the answer provided, instead of running off into the more favoured and exotic hypothesis that has become a major pitfall of many history books I've read lately.


That does look good - did the rest of the book hold up?

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Diamond Dog
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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 16 Oct 2018, 10:50

rorebhoy wrote:
Diamond Dog wrote:
A couple of chapters into this... fascinating read so far.. debunking quite important parts of the origins of Rome, but also taking the time to explain why it couldn't possibly be so and then offering the more likely explanations. What I really like is that when the answer is genuinely "we don't know" then that is the answer provided, instead of running off into the more favoured and exotic hypothesis that has become a major pitfall of many history books I've read lately.


That does look good - did the rest of the book hold up?


So far so good, yes. It is such a vast subject, I'm not sure it can provide the detail that some would like but - as an overview- it's really very good. The way certain well known 'facts' are blown apart is very informative.
“Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities.”

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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 24 Oct 2018, 22:18

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I find his work by turns exasperating and captivating.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Jimbo » 25 Oct 2018, 13:09

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Doing the audio of this, Cornwell's newest in the Utred series. All the macho posturing, the wanton slaughter, the disregard for treaties, the plundering, the game of thrones thing, it all feels contemporary in this, the age of Trump.
Some say the glass is half-empty others half-full. I say. "Lemme see that glass!"