New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Harvey K-Tel
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Re: New now reading

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 06 Apr 2018, 15:29

K wrote:Image
Utterly amazing.


That's a wild book.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 06 Apr 2018, 21:16

Image

I've been on a rare not-reading thing this last week or so. Haven't really gotten much into this, as a result.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 06 Apr 2018, 21:21

Harvey K-Tel wrote:
K wrote:Image
Utterly amazing.


That's a wild book.

God yes. Just unrelenting. But wonderful.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 08 Apr 2018, 18:04

Image
Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 10 Apr 2018, 23:36

This is brilliant.
Image
“He’s got the memory of an elephant ... and the trophy cabinet of one too.”

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Re: New now reading

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 11 Apr 2018, 13:58

K wrote:This is brilliant.
Image


I've mentioned this before, but I've known Jeff for a long time, and he plays on my hockey team. He recently gave me a copy of one of his newer books, 'Roughneck', which I'd also highly recommend if you like the Essex County stuff.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 11 Apr 2018, 14:09

I recently bought Roughneck and I'm looking forward to reading it. Essex County is breathtakingly good. So well measured and cinematic in its ambition. You can tell him it's a work of art.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Pansy Puff » 15 Apr 2018, 13:58

Image

This is captivating. What an incredible story.
“He’s got the memory of an elephant ... and the trophy cabinet of one too.”

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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 15 Apr 2018, 21:33

Image

I've never heard of Tom Robbins before, but this is one odd book, I only picked it up because it had a recommendation from Thomas Pynchon on the back. I mean, I don't like Pynchon, but his opinion might be worth listening to. The main plot appears to follow a newly-wed mismatched husband and wife as they travel across America in a winnebago modified to look like a turkey. The sub-plot appears to follow a spoon, a stick, a can of beans, and a sock, as they attempt to reach the Holy Land to restore a temple in honour of the Phoenician Goddess Astarte. So far it's half farce, half classics lesson.

Strangest thing I've read since that Cory Doctorow novel about a bloke whose parents were a washing machine and a mountain.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Graham Murakami » 15 Apr 2018, 22:26

Darkness_Fish wrote:Image

I've never heard of Tom Robbins before, but this is one odd book, I only picked it up because it had a recommendation from Thomas Pynchon on the back. I mean, I don't like Pynchon, but his opinion might be worth listening to. The main plot appears to follow a newly-wed mismatched husband and wife as they travel across America in a winnebago modified to look like a turkey. The sub-plot appears to follow a spoon, a stick, a can of beans, and a sock, as they attempt to reach the Holy Land to restore a temple in honour of the Phoenician Goddess Astarte. So far it's half farce, half classics lesson.

Strangest thing I've read since that Cory Doctorow novel about a bloke whose parents were a washing machine and a mountain.


Very like Pynchon! He was really popular about 25 years ago - there was even a film of one of the books - and some of them were great. The covers were quite stylish then; I'm not sure who designed the one above.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Deebank » 15 Apr 2018, 22:38

I enjoy d that one - and the other Robbins novels I’ve read too.

It’s an Airstream not a Winnebago by the way - these deatails are important!

The subplot about the Israeli and Palestinian restaurant is especially topping cal these da s.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 22 Apr 2018, 20:54

Actually, that book was pretty good. I'm not sure the spoon/sock/beans surreal side-adventure was strictly necessary, though it was an interesting way to deliver a lecture on the history of the conflict between Islam and Judaism. It was properly sprawling, occasionally funny, often disconcertingly fixated on genitalia.

Now about to start:
Image
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 23 Apr 2018, 14:55

Image
Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

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Re: New now reading

Postby gash on ignore » 25 Apr 2018, 13:08



Ahead of the curve. Again.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Minnie the Minx » 01 May 2018, 03:25

Hemingway’s ‘Winner Take Nothing’ which begins depressingly with hideous, detailed descriptions of animal slaughter. I always forget that element of his work. Maybe the cover, which features two hunters carrying a carcass should have been a clue...
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Re: New now reading

Postby Robert » 01 May 2018, 09:35

Snarfyguy wrote:Image



How's the book? I saw it in the shop recently and considered buying it.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Diamond Dog » 01 May 2018, 09:55

Image

The thread on "Screenadelica" made me finally open this up- a really wonderful explanation of the process for the Disney animation, from Mickey Mouse (actually before that with Steamboat Willie, Mortimer etc) through to the 90's "Hercules". This is an updated version of the original, produced in the mid 50's (and now worth a pretty penny).

If you like Disney and/or animation.... you should try this. The detail around the actual drawing/filing etc is tremendous, but there's also quite a bit of info re the company, the people, the business and the politics too.
In other words an extended look into *******’s head, and it seems to have some pretty good things in it (who among us is totally free of mental garbage?) It’s nice to see that he is confident enough so he can play some blues again,I’d like to hear more.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 01 May 2018, 14:05

Robert wrote:
Snarfyguy wrote:Image



How's the book? I saw it in the shop recently and considered buying it.

Very good, but also infuriating and depressing. There's an interview and excerpt here, if you'd like to check it out: http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2018/04/ ... mond-trump
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Re: New now reading

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 01 May 2018, 14:37

Currently on this. The title really says it all - a series of journalistic essays in which the author has immersed herself into the worlds of various social groups, and examines her own reactions and experiences within them. That sounds fairly dry, but it's quite interesting.

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Re: New now reading

Postby gash on ignore » 01 May 2018, 23:10

Just watched a tv show on London Writers during the blitz. I need to pick up The Heat of the Day by Elizabeth Bowen and The Walls Do Not Fall by H.D. The latter seems like it could be a blast

H.D. wrote part of TWDNF while living in London through the Blitz (1940–41). The poem opens with the speaker walking through the devastated city after a bombing raid, a landscape of collapsed roofs and settling ash. In this opening section H.D. begins to powerfully layer the speaker’s impressions of the Second World War with allusions to past civilisations and world mythology. Inspired by H.D.’s visit to Egypt in 1923, London’s wrecked buildings remind the speaker of the ruins of ancient Egypt or classical Greece: ‘there, as here, ruin opens / the tomb, the temple; enter, / there as here, there are no doors’. Like many modernists, H.D. uses the classical past as a frame for the disordered, fragmented present.

In the face of this destruction, however, the poem is pervaded by a sense of hope: ‘the frame held: / we passed the flame: we wonder / what saved us? what for?’. We have faced death, the poem tells us, but all is not destroyed. The summoning of ancient ruined architecture and surviving myths further strengthens the sense of endurance against the odds. The speaker’s personal response is symbolised by their transformation from shell, to worm, to butterfly.

TWDNF is as much a poem about war as it is about literature and the role of the writer. Or, as H.D. terms it, the struggle between the ‘Word’ and the ‘Sword’. Writing is a creative, regenerating act amongst destruction; ‘through our desolation, / thoughts stir, inspiration stalks us / through gloom’. H.D. casts the writer as a silk worm who consumes detritus and spins silk. She challenges those who declare ‘poets are useless’. To those who say, ‘so what good are your scribblings?’ she counters, ‘this - we take them with us / beyond death’. Her message is that literature and words endure, underpin civilisations, and bring order to chaos:

remember, O Sword,
you are the younger brother, the latter-born,
your Triumph, however exultant,
must one day be over,
in the beginning
was the Word.
It takes a big man to cry, but it takes a bigger man to laugh at that man.

Diamond Dog wrote:I could of course be talking bollocks... let's see what any musicians have to say