New now reading

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Darkness_Fish
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 31 Jul 2017, 09:49

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Bride Of Sea Of Tunes
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Re: New now reading

Postby Bride Of Sea Of Tunes » 31 Jul 2017, 10:13

Riveting:

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...to be followed by:

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neville harp
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Re: New now reading

Postby neville harp » 31 Jul 2017, 10:24

The fake Googamooga posts, riveting stuff.

Thank you Sherlock Hodgson.
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Re: New now reading

Postby echolalia » 05 Aug 2017, 17:55

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A recent discovery, for me. Lambert co-wrote Nicholas Ray’s Bitter Victory among many other things. He was an insider and simultaneously an outsider, perhaps on account of his sexuality. This was his first novel except it’s really a collection of unconnected short stories with recurring characters – oddballs and waifs and strays that the narrator meets as he drifts aimlessly around the place. He sympathizes with them but in the end is always unable to help them, because there’s always this nagging awareness that to help them would be to destroy them further. Creeping erosion is the leitmotif that binds it all together – of land, integrity, the future etc. I liked it a lot.

So I’m now on to

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and about 30 pages in. The prologue takes place at the Tomb of the Unknown Starlet, which an oddball teenager visits every day to wallow in grief/self-pity. So he’s the first of the Goodbye People. I’m looking forward to reading about the others!

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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 05 Aug 2017, 20:38

Darkness_Fish wrote:Image

This really was a bit shit. I've enjoyed some Gladwell, he's normally a quite engaging writer, but this seems such a lazy collection of anecdotes as pop-science, and even then it struggles to define the point its trying to make.

And onwards onto:

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^^^^^ great post. Thank you.
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Re: New now reading

Postby ^^^^^ great post. Thank you. » 06 Aug 2017, 14:17

I've got three on the go at the minute.
Hemingway's 'Across the River and Into the Trees' which although beautifully written, is not 'connecting' with me in the same way as his other works.
Russell's 'A History of Western Philosophy' which has type so tiny that I can't see it in a dark room, which is my fabourite place to read. At this rate I'll be reading it on the shitter and finishing it in 2019.
Kerouac's Desolation Angels, an absolute cracker.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Deebank » 07 Aug 2017, 11:06

Harvey K-Tel wrote:About halfway through this one. Despite some unsubstantiated claims that got my hackles up, a very fine read...

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Yes, see above. Fascinating stuff. There's a lot of unsubstatiated 'claims' but I think most of it holds up. What in particular pissed you off?

I bought his Homo Deus but haven't started that yet.

It reminded me of James Burke's Connections TV series from the 70s. I used to love that.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Toby » 07 Aug 2017, 11:22

I've got that lined up but I generally steer clear of books like it that try to shoehorn a thesis into a grand narrative..Will give it a go though as several others have recommended it.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Deebank » 07 Aug 2017, 12:07

Toby wrote:I've got that lined up but I generally steer clear of books like it that try to shoehorn a thesis into a grand narrative..Will give it a go though as several others have recommended it.


I don't think he really has a single concept or thesis as such. His views are quite balanced - that is why I was asking Harvey what in particular he disagreed with. I suspect you may quibble with his analysis of capitalism perhaps.

There's an element of the argument that knowledge and technology bring a degree of liberation but on the flip side he also suggests that things like the agricultural revolution were a very bad deal for humanity as a whole compared to the 'Eden' of the hunter gatherer lifestyle (as a single example).
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Re: New now reading

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 07 Aug 2017, 15:32

Deebank wrote:
Yes, see above. Fascinating stuff. There's a lot of unsubstatiated 'claims' but I think most of it holds up. What in particular pissed you off?



I don't remember now, but he basically stated as fact a few things that occurred before recorded history, and it seemed to me as though there was certainly room for different interpretations. I probably won't go back to find examples, so you'll just have to take my word for it. :)
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Re: New now reading

Postby Deebank » 07 Aug 2017, 17:52

Harvey K-Tel wrote:
Deebank wrote:
Yes, see above. Fascinating stuff. There's a lot of unsubstatiated 'claims' but I think most of it holds up. What in particular pissed you off?



I don't remember now, but he basically stated as fact a few things that occurred before recorded history, and it seemed to me as though there was certainly room for different interpretations. I probably won't go back to find examples, so you'll just have to take my word for it. :)


Fair enough.

You've reminded me that his take on the agricultural 'revolution' is challenged by experts like Francis Pryor who see agriculture developing gradually wherever there are people. For example there's evidence that nut trees were deliberately 'cultivated' at Starr Car in NE England, a very early hunter gatherer settlement.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Snarfyguy » 07 Aug 2017, 19:46

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I don't know anything about this; someone left it behind when she was done with it. It's good enough, I guess.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 07 Aug 2017, 19:54

Sold! I'll take a dozen!
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Re: New now reading

Postby FOR5 » 10 Aug 2017, 10:09

Got these two out from the library last week, read The Mixer, really good. Not started No Hunger in Paradise yet, though I have got The Nowhere Men by the same author and it was a brilliant read.

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Re: New now reading

Postby Geezee » 14 Aug 2017, 09:28

Tactful Cactus wrote:
Grey Error wrote:
Tactful Cactus wrote:
I loved it -- especially his crazy Haiti hiatus in the 1980s


That was INSANE. I was crying with laughter.


Trynka's Bowie bio is a good companion.


I just finished the Iggy bio - really perfect summer reading, and I'll move onto the Bowie bio as well - as you say it seems to make for a good companion piece. Someone else mentioned (regarding the Bowie bio) that Trynka was strangely mute on the subject of the actual music - and I found this very much to be the case for the Iggy bio as well. He mentions that Fun House is one of the best albums of all time many times - but never explains why or what specifically. To the extent that he examines the music, he spends one paragraph on the debut album talking about where each riff came from - which actually I found quite interesting as I didn't know any of them (for example that some of them came from The Byrds, which hadn't connected with me before at all). I'd have liked more of that, and while he is good at grappling with the Iggy versus Jim Osterberg conflicts and has researched his life admirably, there are very occasions where we actually hear Jim/Iggy's own voice - interviews etc - which makes him seem quite remote.

Probably my biggest qualm otherwise is the lack of insight gleaned on Ron Asheton. Yes, it's a bio on Iggy, but Trynka repeatedly mentions that the key to understanding Iggy is to understand Ron - but then he never proceeds to examine Ron in any meaningful way. For example, I've always found Ron's fascination with nazism to be difficult to deal with - and goes very contrary to the "gentle" image that he generally had (versus the more demonic James Williamson). Trynka essentially dismisses it as harmless fun - and makes jokes at how Ron kindly refrained from wearing one of his gestapo uniforms at Iggy's first wedding to a jewish girl (and wore a German army one instead, or something like that). But even the recent Stooges doc gleans some more interesting insight into this than Trynka does (which is pretty damning considering a documentary only has an hour or so to cover it's territory) - it makes the connection between this fascination and the Ashetons' father (which still doesn't really explain it, but at least it opens a door to understanding it).

Sometimes find the jokey tone about underage sx to be difficult to deal with - it's a difficult subject, and should be handled as such. But otherwise, very well-researched and written (sometimes needed tighter editing - Danny Sugarman gets weirdly introduced twice).
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Re: New now reading

Postby rorebhoy » 14 Aug 2017, 10:10

Just finished two soul biogs this week.
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A great Wilson Pickett book by Tony Fletcher. I loved his previous book on Keith Moon (Dear Boy), and so was excited to see him tackle Pickett. It's a really good book. He tackles Pickett warts and all, and gives a very fair and honest account of the man, not shirking on his dark side. While obviously a fan, this doesn't read as a fanboy fawning, and gives a good critical assessment of his work. The chapters describing the Fame sessions are absolutely top notch - some of the best writing about music creation, capturing the excitement of the music that you rarely find in other books.
Apparently he's working on a Solomon Burke biog next, so really looking forward to that...

Second one was the also recently published biog by Jonathon Gould on Otis
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The approach taken here is a more academic one, with a rich telling of history, politics and the south. While in many books, this scene-setting provides a backdrop, Gould here manages to contextualise everything in the context of his life and career, particularly his dealings with his white management. While an unabashed Otis fan, he provides a real critical eye to the sacred cow of Stax. I love Stax and have read umpteen books on the label, but this is one of the few which looks at them with a colder eye, rather than being enthralled by the music and legend. For a short life and music career, coupled with a lack of printed interviews with Otis himself to work from, this is an excellent, excellent book.

Really enjoyed them both.

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Re: New now reading

Postby K » 14 Aug 2017, 11:03

^^^^^ great post. Thank you. wrote:Russell's 'A History of Western Philosophy' which has type so tiny that I can't see it in a dark room, which is my fabourite place to read. At this rate I'll be reading it on the shitter and finishing it in 2019.

A brilliant piece of work. Although I think it was written right at the ned of WW 2 so he is a bit down on Nietzsche but his work on the Greek philosophers and the modern philosophers is brilliant.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 14 Aug 2017, 11:30

K wrote:
^^^^^ great post. Thank you. wrote:Russell's 'A History of Western Philosophy' which has type so tiny that I can't see it in a dark room, which is my fabourite place to read. At this rate I'll be reading it on the shitter and finishing it in 2019.

A brilliant piece of work. Although I think it was written right at the ned of WW 2 so he is a bit down on Nietzsche but his work on the Greek philosophers and the modern philosophers is brilliant.

I hear differing opinions on that one, from people who studied philosophy, that Leibniz was really the only philosopher that Russell was genuinely an expert on, and that some of the profiles of the other philosophers were scratchy at best. Personally, as a unschooled know-nothing, it seemed to me that the between the Greeks and the enlightenment, there wasn't an awful lot of advancement of thought, a philosopher's time was mostly spent dancing around Christian dogma. I did find it a bit of a slog, it has to be said.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Darkness_Fish » 14 Aug 2017, 11:31

Sorry if there were any spoilers there.
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Re: New now reading

Postby Positive Passion » 14 Aug 2017, 11:42

A brilliant book.

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I have just finished this:

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