Slavery semantics

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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KeithPratt
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Slavery semantics

Postby KeithPratt » 05 Jul 2020, 15:44

Estate agents are dropping the term "master" bedroom over potential links to slavery.

What next? Headmaster?

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Deebank » 05 Jul 2020, 16:13

I was thinking about this.
In the recording/ live music industry the terms slave and slaved are used a loT: slave amplifier etc -

An alternative should be easy to find if necessary though. Language is continually changing after all.

John Cleese got into trouble recently for using the word ‘squaw’, meaning wife. I didn’t know it is offensive but I can see why it could be.
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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Flower » 05 Jul 2020, 17:30

I stumbled across Anthony Brian Logan on YouTube (I didn't hurt him) a few weeks ago. I first heard about the "Master Bedroom" from this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=puK4w2p6m-I&t=323s

*Can't get the link to embed. Some people consider ABL to be an Uncle Tom while others feel that he just has common sense. No commentary is being made just an awareness of the "Master Bedroom "issue"
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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Samoan » 05 Jul 2020, 17:50

KeithPratt wrote:Estate agents are dropping the term "master" bedroom over potential links to slavery.

What next? Headmaster?


Tricky.

Oxbridge colleges use the name Master or Mistress to denote their head.

There's also the Pupil Masters and Mistresses who mentor trainee barristers in England. (I'm not sure if they use that term in the Scottish legal world)

I think they'd all be formidable opponents of change but they may well have to consider it...
Nonsense to the aggressiveness, I've seen more aggression on the my little pony message board......I mean I was told.

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Sam Stone » 05 Jul 2020, 18:15

Sadly, slavery didn’t come to an end with William Wilberforce in the UK or Lincoln in the US.

To just change or avoid using the word so as not to offend modern sensitivities is to ignore the plight of the many Third World nationals who are still slaves across the Middle East, Asia and ironically even Africa itself.
Last edited by Sam Stone on 06 Jul 2020, 10:35, edited 1 time in total.

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John aka Josh
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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby John aka Josh » 05 Jul 2020, 22:57

KeithPratt wrote:Estate agents are dropping the term "master" bedroom over potential links to slavery.

What next? Headmaster?





The school I teach in dropped Headmaster & Headmistress about 20 years ago. Headteacher is the preferred term, and I think it's so for all schools in my area.
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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Jimbo » 06 Jul 2020, 03:33

Jewlery. :x
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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby The Prof » 06 Jul 2020, 08:06

In the photography world when you sync 2 flash heads together they’re referred to as ‘master’ and ‘slave’, or ‘slave trigger’ or even ‘slave unit’.
Canon announced last week that it would be dropping the terms.
Probably not before time too.

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Positive Passion » 06 Jul 2020, 09:14

I was slaving over a hot stove last night, but eventually mastered the technique.

Anyway on a different point you have no doubt noticed that supermarkets (i am thinking of Sainsbury's, but I think Tesco do this too) are rebranding their "own brand" products by using a variety of names to suggest a small business. So sainsbury basics tinned tomatoes are now called Hubbard's Foodstore tinned toms, and there are dozens of other examples.
Because I will drink any old junk at the weekend I bought a bottle of what would have been Sainsbury basics Kentucky bourbon. This, no doubt after some lengthy process, has been rebranded as "Dixie Pete's Kentucky Bourbon". I can only assume this won't last long.

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Deebank » 06 Jul 2020, 10:06

Positive Passion wrote:I was slaving over a hot stove last night, but eventually mastered the technique.

Anyway on a different point you have no doubt noticed that supermarkets (i am thinking of Sainsbury's, but I think Tesco do this too) are rebranding their "own brand" products by using a variety of names to suggest a small business. So sainsbury basics tinned tomatoes are now called Hubbard's Foodstore tinned toms, and there are dozens of other examples.
Because I will drink any old junk at the weekend I bought a bottle of what would have been Sainsbury basics Kentucky bourbon. This, no doubt after some lengthy process, has been rebranded as "Dixie Pete's Kentucky Bourbon". I can only assume this won't last long.


While I don't know anything about the derivation of the term 'Dixie', surely Kentucky bourbon is what it is and comes from a specific area, so if you're going to have any reference to the product's history or lineage there's going to draw on that (potentially) contentious past.

Although having just checked up I note that Dixie specifically refers to the confederate states, so I suppose it is inextricably linked to slavery.... And also jazz of course which complicates the picture :?
I've been talking about writing a book - 25 years of TEFL - for a few years now. I've got it in me.

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Sam Stone » 06 Jul 2020, 10:34

Deebank wrote:
Positive Passion wrote:

While I don't know anything about the derivation of the term 'Dixie', surely Kentucky bourbon is what it is and comes from a specific area, so if you're going to have any reference to the product's history or lineage there's going to draw on that (potentially) contentious past.

Although having just checked up I note that Dixie specifically refers to the confederate states, so I suppose it is inextricably linked to slavery.... And also jazz of course which complicates the picture :?



Thought the below story was about the Dixie Chicks, it was actually about how Lady Antebellium's name change to Lady A ended up with them inadvertently swiping the name of a black female blues singer.

Blues singer lambasts Lady Antebellum's name change, says she's been Lady A for 20 years

The singer Lady A, who is Black, blasted the country group in an Instagram post Friday, saying: "How can you say Black Lives Matter and put your knee on the neck of another Black artist? I'm not mad..I am however not giving up my name, my brand I worked hard for. #GodWillFightMyBattle #TheRealLadyA #LadyABluesSoulFunkGospelArtist #TheTruthIsLoud"

She told Rolling Stone no one from the group — featuring members Charles Kelley, Hillary Scott and Dave Haywood — reached out to her prior to revealing the name change.

“This is my life," she told the magazine. "Lady A is my brand, I’ve used it for over 20 years, and I’m proud of what I’ve done. This is too much right now."

The country group behind hits "Need You Now" and "Bartender" announced the name change on Thursday, saying it was renouncing antebellum, a term used particularly to describe existing before the American Civil War.

In a statement posted to social media, the band said that when Lady A formed 14 years ago, the group didn't consider the pre-Civil War "associations that weigh down this word," including ties to slavery.

The move comes in the wake of a renewed Black Lives Matter movement following the death of George Floyd, a Black man killed by a white Minneapolis police officer.

"We are deeply sorry for the hurt this has caused and for anyone who has felt unsafe, unseen or unvalued," the band's statement said. "Causing pain was never our hearts' intention, but it doesn't change the fact that indeed, it did just that. So today, we speak up and make a change."

Contributing: Matthew Leimkuehler, Nashville Tennessean and Gary Dinges, USA TODAY.

Published 1:23 PM EDT Jun 16, 2020

[/quote]


Working out that she might soon find herself topping the bill at major arenas, the original Lady A quickly OKed the better-selling band's name change


https://eu.usatoday.com/story/entertain ... 197200001/
Last edited by Sam Stone on 06 Jul 2020, 10:52, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Sam Stone » 06 Jul 2020, 10:37

Sam Stone wrote:Sadly, slavery didn’t come to an end with William Wilberforce in the UK or Lincoln in the US.

To just change or avoid using the word so as not to offend modern sensitivities is to ignore the plight of the many Third World nationals who are still slaves across the Middle East, Asia and ironically even Africa itself.


Following on from my earlier post, here's a map showing the prevalence of slavery in the 21st Century.

Shockingly, something like 1 in 200 people are still slaves.

https://www.globalslaveryindex.org/2018 ... prevalence

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby Positive Passion » 06 Jul 2020, 10:47

Deebank wrote:
Positive Passion wrote:I was slaving over a hot stove last night, but eventually mastered the technique.

Anyway on a different point you have no doubt noticed that supermarkets (i am thinking of Sainsbury's, but I think Tesco do this too) are rebranding their "own brand" products by using a variety of names to suggest a small business. So sainsbury basics tinned tomatoes are now called Hubbard's Foodstore tinned toms, and there are dozens of other examples.
Because I will drink any old junk at the weekend I bought a bottle of what would have been Sainsbury basics Kentucky bourbon. This, no doubt after some lengthy process, has been rebranded as "Dixie Pete's Kentucky Bourbon". I can only assume this won't last long.


While I don't know anything about the derivation of the term 'Dixie', surely Kentucky bourbon is what it is and comes from a specific area, so if you're going to have any reference to the product's history or lineage there's going to draw on that (potentially) contentious past.

Although having just checked up I note that Dixie specifically refers to the confederate states, so I suppose it is inextricably linked to slavery.... And also jazz of course which complicates the picture :?


Yes it is the Dixie that is potentially controversial, not Kentucky, or indeed Pete. I suppose Kentucky Pete's Kentucky Bourbon just sounds crap.

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Re: Slavery semantics

Postby souphound » 07 Jul 2020, 02:11

Deebank wrote:John Cleese got into trouble recently for using the word ‘squaw’, meaning wife. I didn’t know it is offensive but I can see why it could be.


Man, I could go on about this one for a long time. I'll try to keep it short.

First, I live in a bilingual world, and sometimes then same word does not necessarily carry the same meaning in French and in English. In English, I feel, the term "squaw" is more like you say, "wife". A little disrespectful, but ....well ......I dunno.

Again, purely my opinion, the way francophones (and I am one btw) would use it would refer to a loose woman, usually of aboriginal origin who would often make herself available in exchange for a few "gifts". Certainly not a "wife".
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