Moonlanding memories

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never/ever
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Moonlanding memories

Postby never/ever » 21 Jul 2019, 01:07

I was only 2 but I have the memory that I watched the moonlanding and the first steps with my parents...
I was woken up very early, my little sister wasn't (which at the time pleased me a lot) to watch. My dad was the one that was interested in the Apollo-missions and the history of flight in general. It was through his eyes I remember this- he was so struck with awe about all that was unfolding. Obviously I didn't grab the importance but the fact I was watching TV so early made it important.

So what were your memories of this event?
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never/ever
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby never/ever » 21 Jul 2019, 01:31

Eno's contexted it very nicely here too...

https://www.facebook.com/14857396849013 ... 529086420/
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby pcqgod » 21 Jul 2019, 04:13

I don't remember the first moon landing, though I remember seeing the moon buggy from a later mission on television.
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby GoogaMooga » 21 Jul 2019, 06:27

We were living in Nigeria, no TV. So we heard it on shortwave radio. I remember my father stepping outside to get better reception. I was nearly six.
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby GoogaMooga » 21 Jul 2019, 06:29

When I was eight I had a poster of the astronauts on my bedroom wall. One of my very first posters. They were my heroes.
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby Positive Passion » 21 Jul 2019, 06:30

I too am not sure I remember the first moon landing, but remember watching later missions. I also remember going up hills with mum to see various comets or look at the stars. I believe space exploration is worth the money,and it is a shame that in the cold war eighties the US focussed more on looking back at the earth from space, rather than looking outwards.

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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby Lord Rother » 21 Jul 2019, 11:18

I have fairly clear memories of it all.

I remember particularly the extremely fuzzy picture on TV - it was pretty difficult to make out much of what was happening.

The pictures improved beyond all recognition on future expeditions.

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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby John aka Josh » 21 Jul 2019, 21:06

Lord Rother wrote:I have fairly clear memories of it all.

I remember particularly the extremely fuzzy picture on TV - it was pretty difficult to make out much of what was happening.

The pictures improved beyond all recognition on future expeditions.




My memories are fairly clear too, I first saw the footage in the hall of my primary school and had some initial difficulty in working out what was happening. I spent my pocket money on a copy of the Reading Evening Post's Moon Landing Special which I still own.

Was blown away when seeing a Lunar Module at the Science Museum, shocked at how thin the foil wall was. I've been hugely enjoying the current coverage, Eight Days to the Moon which had actors lip synching to the original audio tapes was excellent, the BBC Podcast's 13 Minutes to the Moon are a trove.
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby Hightea » 22 Jul 2019, 01:33

Big event in my home. My dad was communications engineer for the Ranger VII mission and was involved with several missions after.
He was there for Apollo I
He bought us a color Zenith TV for the event its one of the rare memories I've got of our den at the time I was six.

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Ranger VII - Picture taken by the ranger 7 spacecraft before it impacted on the Moon July 31st, 1964. Viewed with three large shallow craters. Taken with a 25mm, f/1 lens from an altitude of 480 miles
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby Geezee » 22 Jul 2019, 09:45

Positive Passion wrote: I believe space exploration is worth the money,and it is a shame that in the cold war eighties the US focussed more on looking back at the earth from space, rather than looking outwards.


What a curious thing to say in my opinion. Surely when of the great - and unexpected - feats of all of this is precisely that - a better awareness of our own planet (and particularly its fragile state as depicted by Earth rising etc). And all of that was really an afterthought. And while many of the technologies developed for space missions have indeed mainly been used for consumers on earth, I don't see that it has come at the expense of looking outwards. Just look at the recent photography of a black hole or missions to Mars etc. Nobody is ever going to diminish our fascination with the outside world, including that beyond earth, even if inevitably it will be set against our human wars, cold or otherwise, and propaganda rhetoric. And while I'll always be amazed at space travel, I think its also a bit blase to say that it is "worth the money", considering the extraordinary expense and harm to our earth that space travel creates while we fail to deal with our own problems.
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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby Lord Rother » 22 Jul 2019, 13:16

John aka Josh wrote:
Lord Rother wrote:I have fairly clear memories of it all.

I remember particularly the extremely fuzzy picture on TV - it was pretty difficult to make out much of what was happening.

The pictures improved beyond all recognition on future expeditions.




My memories are fairly clear too, I first saw the footage in the hall of my primary school and had some initial difficulty in working out what was happening. I spent my pocket money on a copy of the Reading Evening Post's Moon Landing Special which I still own.

Was blown away when seeing a Lunar Module at the Science Museum, shocked at how thin the foil wall was. I've been hugely enjoying the current coverage, Eight Days to the Moon which had actors lip synching to the original audio tapes was excellent, the BBC Podcast's 13 Minutes to the Moon are a trove.


I don’t know whether we’ve established previously but I too was at Primary School in Reading and I too remember watching in the school hall!

Which schools were you at in Reading?

I was Redlands Primary and Reading School.

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Re: Moonlanding memories

Postby John aka Josh » 22 Jul 2019, 20:47

Reception I spent in Whiteknights, the rest of my primary years in Aldryngton, Bulmershe was my secondary school. We lived in Maiden Earley which is in Wokingham Borough rather than Reading. Bulmershe was opened as a grammar, think its academic standing is rather different now!


So you, Mike Oldfield and Charles Shaar Murray are all Redingensians - as is my brother in law (who knew CSM vaguely).
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