Overtourism

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Toby
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Overtourism

Postby Toby » 08 Nov 2018, 09:51

Simon Reeve’s latest series on the Mediterranean had an interesting statistic - it hosts a third of the world’s tourism every year. Around 500 million people go there - an astonishing amount if you think about it.

Now there is a growing notion - overtourism. Places like Barcelona have visible anti-tourist movements, where the heavy tread of the tourist is causing, they feel, too much damage. But conversely, the whole of the Mediterranean absolutely thrives on it for economic reasons.

Furthermore, it is the supposed hellhole places like Benidorm that are actually more sustainable in the long run because they pack so many more tourists into a relatively small place. These are the places that have less plastic and other byproducts of tourism because there is infrastructure to deal with it.

I’m conflicted. I love my 2 week Mediterranean jaunt every year and we always go somewhere relatively rural and out of the way. Tourism keeps places like Sicily and the Greek islands alive but it is clear just looking at the sea that things have to change.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/comm ... the-world/

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Re: Overtourism

Postby GoogaMooga » 08 Nov 2018, 10:05

Not much you can do about it, too many countries and places are absolutely dependent on it. The balancing act is to avoid overtourism, as you call it, whereby you become a less attractive destination and also suffer wear and tear. Case in point: when you finally get inside the Sistine Chapel, after standing in line for hours, you are allowed 15 minutes only, because all that breathing is harmful to the frescos.
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Re: Overtourism

Postby Jimbo » 08 Nov 2018, 10:26

A joke.

Standing on an ocean-facing cliff in Hawaii are three guys, a Russian, a Cuban and a Hawaiian.

The Russian takes out a bottle of top notch vodka, cracks it open, takes one sip and then throws the bottle into the sea. "What are you doing," the others ask. "In Russia, we have so much vodka this means nothing."

The Cuban then takes out a top notch cigar, lights it up, takes one puff and then throws the cigar into the sea. "What are you doing?" ask the other two. "In Cuba, we have so many cigars this means nothing."

Then the Hawaiian guy grabs a Japanese tourist...

Budum-bum.
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Re: Overtourism

Postby Earl E. Eel » 08 Nov 2018, 10:43

I was in Venice just a few weeks ago and you really get a sense of how tourism can adversely affect the spirit of a place and the life of the locals. Over the last year or so they've put up signs close to monuments and churches advising tourists not to sit down (gently and politely, I might add) and I heard - although I didn't see - that the city employs people to tell visitors the same thing. I guess this results in less litter, less wear-and-tear, less aggravation for people trying to work (gaggles of visitors sitting on office steps eating ice-cream, that kind of thing).

The place is mobbed pretty much constantly, as anybody who's been will know, and it's difficult to walk at any kind of pace through many of the narrower streets because of the rubberneckers, phone-abusers, and old folk taking their time. It can't be easy for the 50,000 or so who live there. But the city wouldn't survive without tourism - that much is absolutely clear. And it's getting worse because the Chinese are starting to visit Europe in bigger numbers.

I saw signs all over Barcelona saying 'REFUGEES WELCOME - TOURISTS GO HOME' this year too, which surprised me a bit. And I've heard that Lisbon - a place I've always thought was one of the most serene and unspoilt European capital cities - is fucked off with tourists now too, and authorities are taking action to do something about them.
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Re: Overtourism

Postby Toby » 08 Nov 2018, 10:47

Great big gaggles of tourists going round in anoraks and backpacks - Who on earth would ever want to be a part of that?

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Re: Overtourism

Postby Earl E. Eel » 08 Nov 2018, 10:49

Toby wrote:Great big gaggles of tourists going round in anoraks and backpacks - Who on earth would ever want to be a part of that?


I don't understand that at all. If you travel, do it alone or in couples. It's easier for everyone.

I also wanted to say that the locals in Venice are among the worst for standing about in busy streets blathering and blocking the way.
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I've got more Disky product

a label like Dutch Disky

One comp to avoid, though, is Disky's "Best of the 70's"

Normally, Disky are clever at repackaging

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Re: Overtourism

Postby Toby » 08 Nov 2018, 10:54

Sadly Sun and "culture" are commodities that we can't get enough of.

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Re: Overtourism

Postby Jimbo » 08 Nov 2018, 10:56

Bless them if they help the economy but I hate being one myself. Lots of tourists in Tokyo these days, many from China and I welcome them. For one thing they bring money and secondly they bring and then return to China with good will toward an old enemy. See, you can go to Kyoto or Nara which are loaded with visitors but I tell people that every neighborhood in Japan is a mini-Kyoto, a mini-Japan, each with a shrine or two, a Buddhist temple, and a block or two of Japanese restaurants and bars. Fuck museums. Visit a supermarket for a more fulfilling and delicious cultural experience. I also like to take local buses just to ride and see where they go.
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Re: Overtourism

Postby yomptepi » 08 Nov 2018, 11:11

I think there is a clash between cultural tourism and resort tourism. As Toby says, resort tourism is more sustainable because it is managed, and there is nothing of great cultural value to protect in a place like Benidorm, or Malaga, or any of the resort towns along the Costa's or the Greek Islands. Tourism can be managed and is often the lifeblood of the economy. The problem is places like Florence, Rome, Bruges, Barcelona and even Paris, where the cultural heritage has not been designed for mass tourism. I love a city break, but it is easy to see how impossible tourism makes life in Paris in the summer, or in Venice at any time. Especially now the rivers of Europe are clogged up with Viking fucking cruises, lugging thousands of immobile pensioners from capital to capital. And I don't see it getting any better with all these programs on TV showing everyone what great value a visit is. Personally I think we will be visiting less overwhelmed destinations, like Krakow and Cadiz in future. For as long as that lasts anyway...
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Re: Overtourism

Postby Toby » 08 Nov 2018, 11:28

I'm sure that if the summers are consistently like the last one people in the UK will be flocking to their own coasts instead. Wales I imagine will be very popular.

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Re: Overtourism

Postby yomptepi » 08 Nov 2018, 11:31

Toby wrote:I'm sure that if the summers are consistently like the last one people in the UK will be flocking to their own coasts instead. Wales I imagine will be very popular.


Who in their right minds would voluntarily go to Wales?
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Re: Overtourism

Postby The Modernist » 08 Nov 2018, 11:33

yomptepi wrote:
Toby wrote:I'm sure that if the summers are consistently like the last one people in the UK will be flocking to their own coasts instead. Wales I imagine will be very popular.


Who in their right minds would voluntarily go to Wales?


What a silly remark.

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Re: Overtourism

Postby Deebank » 08 Nov 2018, 11:36

yomptepi wrote:
Toby wrote:I'm sure that if the summers are consistently like the last one people in the UK will be flocking to their own coasts instead. Wales I imagine will be very popular.


Who in their right minds would voluntarily go to Wales?



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Re: Overtourism

Postby yomptepi » 08 Nov 2018, 11:36

The Modernist wrote:
yomptepi wrote:
Toby wrote:I'm sure that if the summers are consistently like the last one people in the UK will be flocking to their own coasts instead. Wales I imagine will be very popular.


Who in their right minds would voluntarily go to Wales?


What a silly remark.


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Re: Overtourism

Postby Robert » 08 Nov 2018, 11:43

yomptepi wrote:I think there is a clash between cultural tourism and resort tourism. As Toby says, resort tourism is more sustainable because it is managed, and there is nothing of great cultural value to protect in a place like Benidorm, or Malaga, or any of the resort towns along the Costa's or the Greek Islands. Tourism can be managed and is often the lifeblood of the economy. The problem is places like Florence, Rome, Bruges, Barcelona and even Paris, where the cultural heritage has not been designed for mass tourism. I love a city break, but it is easy to see how impossible tourism makes life in Paris in the summer, or in Venice at any time. Especially now the rivers of Europe are clogged up with Viking fucking cruises, lugging thousands of immobile pensioners from capital to capital. And I don't see it getting any better with all these programs on TV showing everyone what great value a visit is. Personally I think we will be visiting less overwhelmed destinations, like Krakow and Cadiz in future. For as long as that lasts anyway...


Good luck ! :
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldn ... rties.html

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Re: Overtourism

Postby yomptepi » 08 Nov 2018, 11:53

Robert wrote:
yomptepi wrote:I think there is a clash between cultural tourism and resort tourism. As Toby says, resort tourism is more sustainable because it is managed, and there is nothing of great cultural value to protect in a place like Benidorm, or Malaga, or any of the resort towns along the Costa's or the Greek Islands. Tourism can be managed and is often the lifeblood of the economy. The problem is places like Florence, Rome, Bruges, Barcelona and even Paris, where the cultural heritage has not been designed for mass tourism. I love a city break, but it is easy to see how impossible tourism makes life in Paris in the summer, or in Venice at any time. Especially now the rivers of Europe are clogged up with Viking fucking cruises, lugging thousands of immobile pensioners from capital to capital. And I don't see it getting any better with all these programs on TV showing everyone what great value a visit is. Personally I think we will be visiting less overwhelmed destinations, like Krakow and Cadiz in future. For as long as that lasts anyway...


Good luck ! :
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldn ... rties.html


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Re: Overtourism

Postby The Modernist » 08 Nov 2018, 11:57

yomptepi wrote:
The Modernist wrote:
yomptepi wrote:
Who in their right minds would voluntarily go to Wales?


What a silly remark.


bee wrote:If you're a regular here, having a sense of humour is more important than ever, but at the same time it's less evident in the regulars than it ever was.


Those sort of jokes about Wales are a tired trope.

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Re: Overtourism

Postby yomptepi » 08 Nov 2018, 12:02

The Modernist wrote:
yomptepi wrote:
The Modernist wrote:
What a silly remark.


bee wrote:If you're a regular here, having a sense of humour is more important than ever, but at the same time it's less evident in the regulars than it ever was.


Those sort of jokes about Wales are a tired trope.


Typical fucking miserable Welshman.

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Re: Overtourism

Postby Goat Boy » 08 Nov 2018, 12:23

The impact of airbnb on Edinburgh residents and communities is something that crops up but obviously it's a worldwide issue. We have a real problem with affordable housing here and the impact of airbnb on the renting market (short term over long etc) needs to be addressed. Edinburgh has talked about a tourist tax and maybe we need to start promoting more "responsible" tourism too. Ultimately it comes down to cost and ease but it's one of the downsides of globalisation.

The problem will only get worse as well with the increasing number of middle class Chinese, Russian and Indians travelling abroad too. I've noticed this myself over the last decade.

Part of me feels I should visit major tourist destinations like Venice before it gets even worse. I think I'm gonna go to Florence next year myself but it'll be early April so not peak season. I'll be on my own as well but understand that I am part of the problem too.
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Re: Overtourism

Postby PENK » 08 Nov 2018, 12:32

My sister lives in Barcelona so I've been fortunate enough to experience the city away from the touristy areas, and liked it a lot more for that reason. The thing is, though, if you visit Barcelona as a tourist and just go to the areas outside the centre where all the locals hang out, you don't get to see all the stuff you went there to see.
The same happened in Madrid: I lived there a while and felt I got to know the city properly. They are quite smart there anyway and just funnel all the tourists into a narrow area leading from the Palace through Plaza Mayor and Puerta del Sol out to the Prado, Retiro and Reina Sofia. Everyone who lives there gets on with real life outside that central strip and leaves them to it.

But I see this kind of thing happening all the time now. We were in London a while ago and I took my girlfriend into the British Museum as we were walking past and she'd never been there. We basically never made it out of the entrance hall as there were so many fucking people. We tried to look at the Rosetta Stone but what kind of an experience is it standing on your tiptoes looking at the back of some Slovakian's neck as he and 40 others take their mobile phone pictures of something that as far as you can see is a silhouette in a glass box?

London is big enough and has enough history that if you don't spend your afternoon hanging around outside Buck House or in Trafalgar Square, you can get on with walking around looking at stones where someone did something important in 1682, or pop-up organic oat sample showrooms (with in-house gabber DJs) or whatever, and not really notice any tourists (unless you count the Australians who make up 95% of the service industry workforce there), but they need to find a way of balancing the need to make money with a way of limiting visitor numbers at the actual museums and sights. The Tower, for example, which we were quite keen to do, had an hour-long queue at off-peak time, and you had to pay about £40 to get in. What a load of rubbish.
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