Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Toby
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Toby » 05 Oct 2018, 16:03

Rebranding suggests modernisation and improvement. It’s all very clever stuff. Like when a Marmite produced those squeezy jars over their original glass ones. You buy it for the novelty factor just as much for the product itself.

Marketing people = cunts, essentially.

:evil:

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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Dor-Relip Hotels and Bathings » 05 Oct 2018, 16:13

Nobody is immune. As music fans/consumers, we're just as bad as anyone.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby sloopjohnc » 05 Oct 2018, 16:25

The Modernist wrote:If you think of most things you buy in the supermarket packaging plays very little role in making our decision. Most of our decision are based on previous experience and brand loyalty. Price is also a very important determinant. On the fairly rare ocassion that you are choosing between products you have little prior knowledge of and which are priced equally then it becomes more important. Where it is important, I think, is with luxury products, things you haven't necessarily gone in to buy, but you think "ooh that looks nice".


Every marketing student is taught the four Ps of marketing early on. They are price, product, promotion and place. I would add positioning, ie branding, as part of that mix. How you mix those, depending on the product, is the core of marketing.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby sloopjohnc » 05 Oct 2018, 16:26

TootyFrooty wrote:Ever notice when a brand changes its logo? Fanta, for example, do this every fifteen years or so. For a period after the rebranding, sales increase by a small but significant amount.


Nowadays it's every five years or so at most.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby sloopjohnc » 05 Oct 2018, 16:31

Toby wrote:Rebranding suggests modernisation and improvement.


Usually, but not always.

Mercedes C class of cars is an interesting example. Mercedes wanted to get into the lower end market to help weather recessions with their higher priced models so developed that line.

The problem was they had built the Mercedes brand into a luxury, exclusive brand and were wondering if the new line would degrade their branding. They essentially came up with a campaign telling people that they now had accessibility to a Mercedes, without paying all that money.

It's the whole star belly sneetches conundrum.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Deebank » 05 Oct 2018, 16:55

sloopjohnc wrote:
Toby wrote:Rebranding suggests modernisation and improvement.


Usually, but not always.

Mercedes C class of cars is an interesting example. Mercedes wanted to get into the lower end market to help weather recessions with their higher priced models so developed that line.

The problem was they had built the Mercedes brand into a luxury, exclusive brand and were wondering if the new line would degrade their branding. They essentially came up with a campaign telling people that they now had accessibility to a Mercedes, without paying all that money.

It's the whole star belly sneetches conundrum.


Mercedes also launched Smart too of course - only a budget brand when compared to Merc though perhaps.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Robert » 07 Oct 2018, 22:22

Toby wrote:Rebranding suggests modernisation and improvement. It’s all very clever stuff. Like when a Marmite produced those squeezy jars over their original glass ones. You buy it for the novelty factor just as much for the product itself.

Marketing people = cunts, essentially.

:evil:



Yep, and even bigger ones than yourself. It’s annoying!

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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Dor-Relip Hotels and Bathings » 22 Oct 2018, 12:45

how dreary is this?

Image

and it's quite typical of 80s food packaging



contrast with this from 1965

Image
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Toby » 22 Oct 2018, 12:56

Well, it's about the available technology I suspect. Once people could use photos in their design, then they rushed to do it where possible. We like the latter because it's stripped down to the bare minimum, but has a simplicity about it.

The key question is, at the time, I think all of us at that moment in the supermarket would be wowed by the former.

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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Fonz » 22 Oct 2018, 13:20

Robert wrote:
Toby wrote:Rebranding suggests modernisation and improvement. It’s all very clever stuff. Like when a Marmite produced those squeezy jars over their original glass ones. You buy it for the novelty factor just as much for the product itself.

Marketing people = cunts, essentially.

:evil:



Yep, and even bigger ones than yourself. It’s annoying!



I don’t get this idea that ‘marketing people are bad’. Bill Hicks, who I agreed with on almost everything else, believed that advertising people were scum. I never bought that at all.

Just because someone tell me I need to buy something, because it looks nicer, works better, tastes better etc than the next thing, doesn’t mean I’m going to get suckered into actually buying it, and if I do I will take responsibility for that decision, thank you very much.

Modern people, doing anything they can to blame someone else for their bad decisions, eh...
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Toby » 22 Oct 2018, 13:27

Of course they're not, it's a flippant remark.

But there is something in the way that psychology is used to draw people into branding in particular. Yes, it's what people do, but it is staggeringly successful and only adds to our desire to consume. If you can step outside of it and think "yeah you're not fooling me", then great, but a lot of people don't. There is obviously a line where individual responsibility lies, but marketing and branding aim to claw you over that line and into their realm. And they will do everything they can to make it happen.

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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby Fonz » 22 Oct 2018, 17:22

I’m not saying I’m completely immune to it... but I just don’t think I’ve ever bought something I really didn’t want, on the basis of a fancy box or advert.

The situation changes when arguably the best or most practical items are also the most cleverly marketed. I’m thinking Bose headphones, and Apple anything.
The Bose have the best noise-cancelling but perhaps less/ than the total Hi-Fi experience. It’s the noise-cancelling I crave, but I know I’m paying over the odds for otherwise ordinary cans.
Apple stuff, well, they’re the best bet for me and
my wife for all sorts of reasons, but somehow one feels like a bit of a sucker for buying it.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby sloopjohnc » 22 Oct 2018, 17:36

Fonz wrote:I’m not saying I’m completely immune to it... but I just don’t think I’ve ever bought something I really didn’t want, on the basis of a fancy box or advert.

The situation changes when arguably the best or most practical items are also the most cleverly marketed. I’m thinking Bose headphones, and Apple anything.
The Bose have the best noise-cancelling but perhaps less/ than the total Hi-Fi experience. It’s the noise-cancelling I crave, but I know I’m paying over the odds for otherwise ordinary cans.
Apple stuff, well, they’re the best bet for me and
my wife for all sorts of reasons, but somehow one feels like a bit of a sucker for buying it.


In the '90s, a company named Monster, began heavily marketing their audio and video cables. At one point, they even paid for the stadium naming rights for the local NFL team, the San Francisco 49ers. They marketed their cables as being great quality, but I knew folks who worked there, and they said their components were crappy.

It worked for awhile, but now they're tanking.
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Re: Gauging the importance of aesthetics in product design

Postby sloopjohnc » 22 Oct 2018, 17:40

Toby wrote:Of course they're not, it's a flippant remark.

But there is something in the way that psychology is used to draw people into branding in particular. Yes, it's what people do, but it is staggeringly successful and only adds to our desire to consume. If you can step outside of it and think "yeah you're not fooling me", then great, but a lot of people don't. There is obviously a line where individual responsibility lies, but marketing and branding aim to claw you over that line and into their realm. And they will do everything they can to make it happen.


Part of that equation is frequency of message, not just the message itself.

The best example is TV advertising. Agencies will run 30 second commercials for a couple weeks and then reduce it to 15 seconds. The consumer fills in the rest of the 15 seconds of the original commercial themselves based on what he or she saw.
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