Photography Is Dead

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
caramba
Posts: 336
Joined: 25 Aug 2016, 17:12

Re: Photography Is Dead

Postby caramba » 10 Aug 2018, 17:31

Snarfyguy wrote:WHAT THE - oh... I misread it as Pornography is Dead.

Whew!


Necrophilia is making a bit of a comeback though

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Graham Murakami
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Joined: 20 Nov 2011, 23:35

Re: Photography Is Dead

Postby Graham Murakami » 11 Aug 2018, 10:10

Perhaps photography never was very good?

There is an exhibitions at the Tate Modern now - SHAPE OF LIGHT: 100 YEARS OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND ABSTRACT ART - where each room had one or two pieces of conventional modern art and the photos that were influenced by it. In every case the photos were a poor second best to the painting or sculpture that accompanied them. Photography seemed a small, limited and static art-form without the vibrancy of others

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Your Friendly Neighbourhood Postman
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Re: Photography Is Dead

Postby Your Friendly Neighbourhood Postman » 11 Aug 2018, 16:42

Snarfyguy wrote:WHAT THE - oh... I misread it as Pornography is Dead.

Whew!


:D :D :D
On the whole, I'd rather be in Wallenpaupack.

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Your Friendly Neighbourhood Postman
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Joined: 17 Oct 2010, 14:10
Location: Unrecognized Genius, Me.

Re: Photography Is Dead

Postby Your Friendly Neighbourhood Postman » 11 Aug 2018, 17:01

I wonder:

assuming that the picture has replaced the word (succinctly speaking);

People use images to construct stories in their minds. They tend to read longer and more difficult-to-grasp texts (stories, books) less and less.

Their attention spans have gotten shorter over time, considerably so.

They use their capacities to construct verbally oriented stories in their minds less and less. Their powers of imagination have diminished, or haven't been really developed at all.

Their vocabularies have gotten smaller as a concomitant effect of all this.

It is a fact that children and adolescents in my country, Holland, are much less familiar with the written word in all its forms than they used to be.

The love for, or even familiarity with stories that always were the cornerstones of human civilizations has reached a new low.

Does all of this mean that photography, or for that matter all non-literary arts, suffer(s) as a result? That the inspiration and intuition with which all forms of human expression start, have become much less powerful, or even worse, are lacking? Language shapes intuition and expression.

We mature BCB'ers take so many things for granted, I guess. I am certain that today's youngsters develop their faculties in ways entirely unforeseen in, say, even the eighties of the last century.

The smartphone is now about 10 years old.

And really worrying (side) effects of their intensive use have been found, by serious researchers.

Dr. Manfred Spitzer (psychiatrist, philosopher) found that certain time windows for learning (with people aged 10 to 20), that need be respected in order to train specific memory functions (such as the acquisition of languages, other skills), get neglected in smartphone overuse - and one can't catch up with these negative phenomena in later life.

Jean M. Twenge, a psychologist, found a correlation between long-time smartphone overuse in youngsters and the prevalence of depression:

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/ar ... on/534198/

There's so much that we don't know in full yet, about the bad outcomes of the information 'revolution' that hit us not that long ago. We got inundated with images, newsflashes, soundbytes, noise in general, and we 'unlearned' the fine art of contemplation, reflection, even being skeptical and critical (not me, that is).

Or am I just rambling, and merely producing balderdash instead of verities here?
On the whole, I'd rather be in Wallenpaupack.