Literary food

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Jimbo
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Re: Literary food

Postby Jimbo » 10 Jan 2018, 14:41

Alexander Portnoy and his piece of liver.
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Re: Literary food

Postby gash on ignore » 10 Jan 2018, 14:44

Pie prepped by Titus.
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Re: Literary food

Postby souphound » 10 Jan 2018, 15:06

Nobody for soylent green then?
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Re: Literary food

Postby souphound » 10 Jan 2018, 16:37

I have a cold and my throat is sore (really). I could sure use some of Wnnie the Pooh's hunny.
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Re: Literary food

Postby bobzilla77 » 10 Jan 2018, 19:31

I remember reading about Turkish Delight in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe and thinking it must be fantastic.

Finally at age 30 I got some at the London airport and it's fucking fruit jellies coated in chocolate? Edmund sold out his family for that shit? I no longer believe in Narnia.
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Minnie the Minx
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Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 10 Jan 2018, 20:15

bobzilla77 wrote:I remember reading about Turkish Delight in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe and thinking it must be fantastic.

Finally at age 30 I got some at the London airport and it's fucking fruit jellies coated in chocolate? Edmund sold out his family for that shit? I no longer believe in Narnia.


That stuff is the WORST. Gaggingly horrible. But sounds so delicious and comes in pretty packaging.
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Robert
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Re: Literary food

Postby Robert » 10 Jan 2018, 20:26

Literary schliterary.

As a kid we would sometimes get a Flintstone magazine. In it was also Yogi Bear. He was always hungry and looking for picknicking tourists at the Yosemite park.

Without exception he’d always nick their sandwiches that were always double white ones with a leaf of lettuce sticking out from all sides. Ithought that was fantastic!

Just imagine, ham sandwiches with a leaf of lettuce!!

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Re: Literary food

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 10 Jan 2018, 20:31

Robert wrote:Literary schliterary.

As a kid we would sometimes get a Flintstone magazine. In it was also Yogi Bear. He was always hungry and looking for picknicking tourists at the Yosemite park.

Without exception he’d always nick their sandwiches that were always double white ones with a leaf of lettuce sticking out from all sides. Ithought that was fantastic!

Just imagine, ham sandwiches with a leaf of lettuce!!


[pedant]Yogi Bear lived in Jellystone Park.[/pedant]
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Re: Literary food

Postby Pansy Puff » 10 Jan 2018, 20:47

Minnie the Minx wrote:
souphound wrote:Green eggs and ham anybody. I'd try it.


I used to think about eating that all the time.

I could not, I would not...
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Re: Literary food

Postby Robert » 10 Jan 2018, 20:56

Harvey K-Tel wrote:
Robert wrote:Literary schliterary.

As a kid we would sometimes get a Flintstone magazine. In it was also Yogi Bear. He was always hungry and looking for picknicking tourists at the Yosemite park.

Without exception he’d always nick their sandwiches that were always double white ones with a leaf of lettuce sticking out from all sides. Ithought that was fantastic!

Just imagine, ham sandwiches with a leaf of lettuce!!


[pedant]Yogi Bear lived in Jellystone Park.[/pedant]


Yellowstone park! Indeed it was.

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Re: Literary food

Postby John aka Josh » 10 Jan 2018, 21:33

Minnie the Minx wrote:
bobzilla77 wrote:I remember reading about Turkish Delight in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe and thinking it must be fantastic.

Finally at age 30 I got some at the London airport and it's fucking fruit jellies coated in chocolate? Edmund sold out his family for that shit? I no longer believe in Narnia.


That stuff is the WORST. Gaggingly horrible. But sounds so delicious and comes in pretty packaging.





Sounds like you've had the fairly vile Fry's Turkish Delight. Different beast from traditional Turkish Delight (think powdered instant coffee compared to a freshly roasted & ground coffee brew).


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Minnie the Minx
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Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 10 Jan 2018, 21:40

Oh no, I hate that too. :D
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Re: Literary food

Postby bobzilla77 » 10 Jan 2018, 21:55

I have had proper Turkish Delight, as pictured, in later years and it was pretty good. Nice quality lemon jellies, yeah sure. Not my preference but I could eat it, unlike the stuff at the airport, which I now recall was rose flavored jellies covered in crap chocolate. I'm not that into florals anyway and mixed with chocolate it was dastardly.

But even the good stuff is not worth selling out your family to the White Witch.
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Re: Literary food

Postby John aka Josh » 10 Jan 2018, 22:07

bobzilla77 wrote:I have had proper Turkish Delight, as pictured, in later years and it was pretty good. Nice quality lemon jellies, yeah sure. Not my preference but I could eat it, unlike the stuff at the airport, which I now recall was rose flavored jellies covered in crap chocolate. I'm not that into florals anyway and mixed with chocolate it was dastardly.

But even the good stuff is not worth selling out your family to the White Witch.






War time child having his first taste of enchanted Turkish Delight - entrancing.
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Re: Literary food

Postby John aka Josh » 10 Jan 2018, 22:11

Minnie the Minx wrote:Oh no, I hate that too. :D




More to your taste? .




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Literary foods you say.


There's a description by Steinbeck in one of his books (Travels with Charley?) about making coffee, the preparation of which I think involved putting eggshell in the pot, which made me yearn for such a brew.
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Re: Literary food

Postby Belle Lettre » 10 Jan 2018, 22:13

All the cakes and treats packed into the Christmas box in What Katy Did At School. I never established what Debby's jumbles actually were.
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Re: Literary food

Postby John aka Josh » 10 Jan 2018, 22:25

I loved the Paddington books as a very young nipper & thought marmalade sandwiches would be wonderful.


I was wrong.



It took me many years to try marmalade again. It can be wonderful, though homemade so outstrips commercial varieties that I've not had any for several years. Too lazy to make my own marmalade.
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Minnie the Minx
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Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 10 Jan 2018, 22:31

Belle Lettre wrote:All the cakes and treats packed into the Christmas box in What Katy Did At School. I never established what Debby's jumbles actually were.


If you read Joe Baxter's posts above, sounds like he has found out.
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trans-chigley express
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Re: Literary food

Postby trans-chigley express » 11 Jan 2018, 00:27

bobzilla77 wrote:I remember reading about Turkish Delight in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe and thinking it must be fantastic.

Finally at age 30 I got some at the London airport and it's fucking fruit jellies coated in chocolate? Edmund sold out his family for that shit? I no longer believe in Narnia.


It's not coated in chocolate unless you had the Fry's chocolate bar variety but it is basically a rose-scented fruit jelly. I like them

Edit: I see John aka Josh made the same point.
Last edited by trans-chigley express on 11 Jan 2018, 00:29, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Literary food

Postby trans-chigley express » 11 Jan 2018, 00:28

John aka Josh wrote:I loved the Paddington books as a very young nipper & thought marmalade sandwiches would be wonderful.


I was wrong.



It took me many years to try marmalade again. It can be wonderful, though homemade so outstrips commercial varieties that I've not had any for several years. Too lazy to make my own marmalade.


Marmalade is for toast, not sandwiches. Paddington is a stupid arse.