Literary food

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
User avatar
Minnie the Minx
funky thigh collector
Posts: 29466
Joined: 29 Dec 2006, 16:00
Location: In the naughty North and in the sexy South

Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 09 Jan 2018, 20:03

I was just listening to Radio Four or something where people were discussing the food that you read about in literature and how magical and delicious it sounds - some of it actual food, and other, more fantastical food.
It triggered a couple of really strong memories. One, that I always wanted to eat what Madame Cholet from The Wombles cooked - which involved bracken tarts, honey puddings, and all sorts of cakes that involved brambles and nettles.
Secondly, I remembered a story I read as a youngster about a young girl who goes to stay with her grandparents on a farm. They go out for the day and ask her to have dinner ready but she has no money. The whole idea was to foster her "independence" which sounds sort of crappy as she was only about 9 if I recall. Anyway, she went round the farm and gathered eggs, picked new potatoes from the field, picked peas from the stem, gathered some mushrooms from the field. She went to the local butcher and swapped a ton of mushrooms for a couple of rashers of bacon.
I was obsessed with this bartering and swapping shit. She skipped home and prepared this meal - there was a picture of her leaning into the sink and making the crawwwp craaaawp craawp noise that goes with scraping new potatoes and she laid a table with a check tablecloth, decorated with flowers and when her grandparents came home she gave them a supper of bacon, mushrooms, fried eggs, potatoes and peas and a pot of tea with milk she had got from the cow herself. Oh my God, it sounded like the most fabulous meal ever. I wanted so badly to be sat at that table eating that meal.

I don't have anything else to add. But I'd be surprised if I was on my own in getting excited about literary food.
You come at the Queen, you best not miss.

Dr Markus wrote:
Someone in your line of work usually as their own man cave aka the shed we're they can potter around fixing stuff or something don't they?

User avatar
Fonz
Posts: 3588
Joined: 17 Feb 2014, 14:10
Location: Nevermore

Re: Literary food

Postby Fonz » 09 Jan 2018, 20:05

Some sort of biscuit in ‘The Magic Faraway Tree’.

Sounded delish.
Heyyyy!

"Fonz clearly has no fucks to give. I like the cut of his Cupicidal gib."

User avatar
Fonz
Posts: 3588
Joined: 17 Feb 2014, 14:10
Location: Nevermore

Re: Literary food

Postby Fonz » 09 Jan 2018, 20:06

Some sort of biscuit in ‘The Magic Faraway Tree’.
‘Pop Biscuits’
Sounded delish.
Heyyyy!

"Fonz clearly has no fucks to give. I like the cut of his Cupicidal gib."

User avatar
Harvey K-Tel
Long Player
Posts: 39703
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 23:20
Location: 1220 on your AM dial

Re: Literary food

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 09 Jan 2018, 20:22

Not terribly "literary", but...

Image

is one that sticks in my mind mainly because of the pictures of "the smell of cheese" wafting through the air:

Image

I didn't even like cheese when I was little, but this book made me want to like cheese, because everybody in it looked so happy when they smelled cheese wafting from the king's castle.

Eventually I learned to love cheese.
If you've got nothing to do, don't do it here.

User avatar
Darkness_Fish
Posts: 5342
Joined: 27 Jul 2015, 09:58

Re: Literary food

Postby Darkness_Fish » 09 Jan 2018, 20:22

I was going to mock Fonz for his idea of literature, until he clarified his stance on Pop Biscuits. For some reason, they have some kind of strong-yet-vague emotional pull on me.

I bloody loved the Magic Faraway Tree.
Like fast-moving clouds casting shadows against a hillside, the melody-loop shuddered with a sense of the sublime, the awful unknowable majesty of the world.

User avatar
Samoan
Posts: 10030
Joined: 28 May 2008, 10:22
Location: Red Hen restaurant

Re: Literary food

Postby Samoan » 09 Jan 2018, 20:45

I wanted to be Charlie and have Willie Wonka lean over the side of the boat and scoop up a mug of warm liquid chocolate from the river for me to drink.
bobzilla77 wrote:Those people who say the guitars sound like bagpipes have never really listened to bagpipes.

User avatar
Fireplug
Posts: 3609
Joined: 23 Jan 2009, 18:59

Re: Literary food

Postby Fireplug » 09 Jan 2018, 21:09

Manuel Vásquez Montalbán wrote some delicious descriptions of meals in Barcelona as eaten by Pepe Carvalho, the gastronome protagonist of many of his novels.

User avatar
souphound
World Class Ignoramus
Posts: 24924
Joined: 27 Oct 2003, 19:49
Location: Tralfamadore, with Montana Wildhack

Re: Literary food

Postby souphound » 09 Jan 2018, 21:22

Green eggs and ham anybody. I'd try it.
Footy wrote:Last week, I discovered that the cordless drill I bought about 5 years ago is, in fact, a cordless screwdiver.

User avatar
Minnie the Minx
funky thigh collector
Posts: 29466
Joined: 29 Dec 2006, 16:00
Location: In the naughty North and in the sexy South

Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 09 Jan 2018, 21:50

souphound wrote:Green eggs and ham anybody. I'd try it.


I used to think about eating that all the time.
You come at the Queen, you best not miss.

Dr Markus wrote:
Someone in your line of work usually as their own man cave aka the shed we're they can potter around fixing stuff or something don't they?

User avatar
Belle Lettre
Éminence grise
Posts: 15426
Joined: 09 Oct 2008, 07:16
Location: Antiterra

Re: Literary food

Postby Belle Lettre » 09 Jan 2018, 21:53

Maigret's café meals.
Nikki Gradual wrote:
Get a fucking grip you narcissistic cretins.

User avatar
Minnie the Minx
funky thigh collector
Posts: 29466
Joined: 29 Dec 2006, 16:00
Location: In the naughty North and in the sexy South

Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 09 Jan 2018, 22:07

Every single pie that anybody put on a window ledge to cool in absolutely any story.
You come at the Queen, you best not miss.

Dr Markus wrote:
Someone in your line of work usually as their own man cave aka the shed we're they can potter around fixing stuff or something don't they?

User avatar
gash on ignore
cultural defective
Posts: 16443
Joined: 29 Sep 2007, 00:32
Location: lording it

Re: Literary food

Postby gash on ignore » 09 Jan 2018, 22:19

Paradise Hot Dogs
It takes a big man to cry, but it takes a bigger man to laugh at that man.

Diamond Dog wrote:I could of course be talking bollocks... let's see what any musicians have to say


sloopjohnc
Posts: 62507
Joined: 03 Jun 2004, 20:12

Re: Literary food

Postby sloopjohnc » 09 Jan 2018, 22:31

Sure to reach 20 pages. . .

User avatar
Minnie the Minx
funky thigh collector
Posts: 29466
Joined: 29 Dec 2006, 16:00
Location: In the naughty North and in the sexy South

Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 09 Jan 2018, 22:34

sloopjohnc wrote:Sure to reach 20 pages. . .


U ok hun?
You come at the Queen, you best not miss.

Dr Markus wrote:
Someone in your line of work usually as their own man cave aka the shed we're they can potter around fixing stuff or something don't they?

User avatar
Minnie the Minx
funky thigh collector
Posts: 29466
Joined: 29 Dec 2006, 16:00
Location: In the naughty North and in the sexy South

Re: Literary food

Postby Minnie the Minx » 09 Jan 2018, 22:43

The cheese being grilled over the fire in Heidi. I tried it with the gas fire and a cheese triangle. Got permanent fat stains on the gas grills and the house had the vague whiff of cheese on toast for a month.
You come at the Queen, you best not miss.

Dr Markus wrote:
Someone in your line of work usually as their own man cave aka the shed we're they can potter around fixing stuff or something don't they?

sloopjohnc
Posts: 62507
Joined: 03 Jun 2004, 20:12

Re: Literary food

Postby sloopjohnc » 09 Jan 2018, 22:43

Minnie the Minx wrote:
sloopjohnc wrote:Sure to reach 20 pages. . .


U ok hun?


Literary food?

I'm the king of self immolating thread killers, just so ya know I shouldn't talk.

But it has made me hungry. Maybe I'll start a "What do you order at the Jack in the Box drive thru? thread.

User avatar
mission
Posts: 2168
Joined: 04 Apr 2008, 13:39

Re: Literary food

Postby mission » 10 Jan 2018, 03:37

Anthony Burgess wrote about this and maintained that it is not the elaborate meals written of that we remember and hanker after but the simple fare, the hard tack of Don Quixote or the mean pantry meals cobbled together in the Blyton midnight feasts of our memories.

I am with Ignatious and Nev. I'd go me some of those hotdogs in a trice.

Also the White Castle burgers Lethem fetishises in Motherless Brooklyn.
Good.

User avatar
Jimbo
Posts: 14983
Joined: 26 Dec 2009, 21:22

Re: Literary food

Postby Jimbo » 10 Jan 2018, 13:21

Just read about these two bums on the run in the Texas desert eating camp fired, salted and peppered, skewered white tailed deer chunks and the writer said eating doesn't get much better.

Image
Gadfly

User avatar
Flower
Posts: 5113
Joined: 05 Mar 2009, 22:22
Location: Unlisted

Re: Literary food

Postby Flower » 10 Jan 2018, 13:40

James Lee Burke ... Dave Robicheaux's ham and onion sandwiches.

Robert B. Parker's .. Spenser's donuts and Johnny Walker Blue. Made us buy more donuts, crave donuts and Johnny Walker Blue but not together.

Janet Evanovich .. Want to go to Frank and Helen Plum's house for dinner, usually meatloaf with real mashed potatoes, pot roast or roast chicken, sometimes lasagna. Do NOT wish to try Stephanie's peanut butter and olive sandwiches.

Lilian Jackson Braun ... Would like to try the restaurants in and around the town of Brrr in her 'The Cat Who' series. The restaurants were the reason to read the books, not the weak storylines.

Daniel Silva .. Chiara's cooking.

Ruth Rendell ... Inspector Wexford .. want to eat at the Olive and the Dove and other restaurants in and around Kingsmarkham.
If love could've saved you, you would've lived forever.

User avatar
Samoan
Posts: 10030
Joined: 28 May 2008, 10:22
Location: Red Hen restaurant

Re: Literary food

Postby Samoan » 10 Jan 2018, 14:27

Minnie the Minx wrote:The cheese being grilled over the fire in Heidi. I tried it with the gas fire and a cheese triangle. Got permanent fat stains on the gas grills and the house had the vague whiff of cheese on toast for a month.

I remember the goats' cheese but I wouldn't hunger after the fresh soft white bread rolls which dried up over time that were hidden and stowed by Heidi in her room in town to take back to Peter's grandmother
bobzilla77 wrote:Those people who say the guitars sound like bagpipes have never really listened to bagpipes.