Literary food

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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trans-chigley express
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Re: Literary food

Postby trans-chigley express » 11 Jan 2018, 00:32

I was always intrigued by the biscuits and gravy they usually seem to eat in The Grapes of Wrath. As an kid from England such a thing sounded disgusting then later I leaned that biscuits are different in the US.

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LeBaron
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Re: Literary food

Postby LeBaron » 11 Jan 2018, 00:38

trans-chigley express wrote:I was always intrigued by the biscuits and gravy they usually seem to eat in The Grapes of Wrath. As an kid from England such a thing sounded disgusting then later I leaned that biscuits are different in the US.


So is the gravy one eats with biscuits!
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trans-chigley express
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Re: Literary food

Postby trans-chigley express » 11 Jan 2018, 00:39

bobzilla77 wrote:I remember reading about Turkish Delight in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe and thinking it must be fantastic.

Finally at age 30 I got some at the London airport and it's fucking fruit jellies coated in chocolate? Edmund sold out his family for that shit? I no longer believe in Narnia.


Interesting read on why C. S. Lewis chose Turkish Delight:
https://daily.jstor.org/turkish-delight/

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trans-chigley express
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Re: Literary food

Postby trans-chigley express » 11 Jan 2018, 00:41

Very Stable Baron wrote:
trans-chigley express wrote:I was always intrigued by the biscuits and gravy they usually seem to eat in The Grapes of Wrath. As an kid from England such a thing sounded disgusting then later I leaned that biscuits are different in the US.


So is the gravy one eats with biscuits!


Yeah I guessed as much. I'd like to have exactly what they ate. The descriptions of cooking pork in that book always made me hungry.

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Samoan
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Re: Literary food

Postby Samoan » 11 Jan 2018, 07:31

bobzilla77 wrote:I remember reading about Turkish Delight in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe and thinking it must be fantastic.

Finally at age 30 I got some at the London airport and it's fucking fruit jellies coated in chocolate? Edmund sold out his family for that shit? I no longer believe in Narnia.

The best Turkish Delight used to come from Ireland packaged in wooden boxes and tissue paper: my Aunt sent emergency food parcels of it along with other delicacies like Kimberley biscuits and soda bread flour.

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LeBaron
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Re: Literary food

Postby LeBaron » 11 Jan 2018, 13:26

Hemingway’s descriptions of hanging out in Spain (or wherever he was) and having wine hanging out in the river has ... stayed with me.
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Toby
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Re: Literary food

Postby Toby » 11 Jan 2018, 13:32

The Roasted Wild Boar at the end of Asterix's adventures. Of course, those Gauls knew fuck all about side dishes didn't they?

There's also a fondue section in Asterix in Switzerland that must have been a send-up of the seventies.

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Re: Literary food

Postby northernsky » 11 Jan 2018, 14:36

trans-chigley express wrote:I was always intrigued by the biscuits and gravy they usually seem to eat in The Grapes of Wrath. As an kid from England such a thing sounded disgusting then later I leaned that biscuits are different in the US.


I'm curious about the hard tack beloved of seamen both literary and actual.
Here's the oldest preserved ship's biscuit in the world, in the Danish Maritime Museum.

Image

From 1852, and I bet it tastes just as good now as it did then :? .

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Jimbo
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Re: Literary food

Postby Jimbo » 11 Jan 2018, 15:54

Patrick O'Brian's lobscouse, burgoo and spotted dog - whatever they are.
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