Stockholm tips please

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
User avatar
Polishgirl
Posts: 8562
Joined: 21 Dec 2009, 22:06

Stockholm tips please

Postby Polishgirl » 28 Dec 2017, 18:27

Ok; I'm sticking this on here because it's more likely to be seen than on the World board, and because that's just how I roll.

Next holiday with my trusty friend looks like being a week in Stockholm ( if I can ever get over my burgeoning fear of flying - no idea where that came from! It's a complete pain in the arse).

It would be great to get some ideas about things to do/visit, especially inside tips from those in the know. We quite like getting out of the city too, so any suggestions for day trips out and about would be very helpful. I'm also wondering exactly how expensive Stockholm is for things like transport, supermarket shopping. We're not big drinkers, and we're not fussed about eating out anywhere fancy at all. I'm looking at finding an Air BNB if possible, because accomm prices certainly seem higher than the average European city break jaunt.

Time wise, looking at mid April to end May.

Thanks chaps.
echolalia wrote: I despise Prefab Sprout. It will be decades before “hot dog, jumping frog, Albuquerque” is surpassed as the most terrible lyric in pop history. That fucking bastard ruined all three things for me forever.

User avatar
The Great Defector
Posts: 16506
Joined: 07 Jan 2012, 18:16

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby The Great Defector » 28 Dec 2017, 18:36

Syndrome or city?
Drama Queenie wrote:You are a chauvinist of the quaintest kind. About as threatening as Jack Duckworth, you are a harmless relic of that cherished era when things were 'different'. Now get back to drawing a moustache on that page three model

User avatar
PENK
Midnight to Six Man
Posts: 33872
Joined: 07 Aug 2004, 20:12
Location: Stockholm

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby PENK » 30 Dec 2017, 10:47

You’ll want the Abba Museum. Further afield, there are some really good places nearby: Paris, Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen are just a couple of hours by plane.
Copehead wrote:I have met Gruff Rhys - although he claimed he wasn't and that he couldn't speak Welsh, as I spoke to him in Welsh, but it was him lying bastard.

User avatar
PENK
Midnight to Six Man
Posts: 33872
Joined: 07 Aug 2004, 20:12
Location: Stockholm

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby PENK » 30 Dec 2017, 10:47

(I’ll do some proper tips when I have more time)
Copehead wrote:I have met Gruff Rhys - although he claimed he wasn't and that he couldn't speak Welsh, as I spoke to him in Welsh, but it was him lying bastard.

User avatar
Polishgirl
Posts: 8562
Joined: 21 Dec 2009, 22:06

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Polishgirl » 30 Dec 2017, 21:15

Thank you; much appreciated.

( NB : I am very much interested in the ABBA Museum. Who wouldn’t be! )
echolalia wrote: I despise Prefab Sprout. It will be decades before “hot dog, jumping frog, Albuquerque” is surpassed as the most terrible lyric in pop history. That fucking bastard ruined all three things for me forever.

User avatar
Geezee
Posts: 11979
Joined: 24 Jul 2003, 10:14
Location: Where joy divides into vision

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Geezee » 01 Jan 2018, 17:19

I'll get ot this when I have a bit of time too!
Smilies are ON
Flash is OFF
Url is ON

User avatar
PENK
Midnight to Six Man
Posts: 33872
Joined: 07 Aug 2004, 20:12
Location: Stockholm

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby PENK » 15 Jan 2018, 10:59

Polishgirl wrote: I'm also wondering exactly how expensive Stockholm is for things like transport, supermarket shopping. We're not big drinkers, and we're not fussed about eating out anywhere fancy at all.


OK, let's get the bad news out of the way first: it's pretty expensive.

Transport tickets have just had yet another price hike - yep, they have privatisation in Sweden too! - and a weekly ticket will now cost you about £30. It does get you on all of the metro lines, buses, trams, commuter trains and even inner-city ferries too, so there is that, and the coverage is good and (largely) reliable.

Supermarket shopping is pricey too, for someone not on Nordic wages. The two main chains are ICA and Coop (basically the Co-Op) and you'll also see Hemköp and the cheaper Willys and ubiquitous Lidl amongst others. ICA and Coop - the bigger stores at least - are usually well-stocked with good-quality produce and have plenty of variety. Again, it's expensive, but a good rule of thumb is the bigger the branch, the better the range and the lower the prices.
Traditional Swedish food itself usually involves boiled potatoes. Many Swedes have realised that this kind of thing is a bit boring, and started adding more modern, international ingredients and styles, which is welcome, so you will now find good cuts of meat, plenty of fresh veg and so on. They are very big on their organic stuff here too. The "international food" section normally involves lots of Tex-Mex stuff, some Thai sauces and spices, and a couple of packets of naan bread, but if you go to the bigger branches you'll find things you need.
A word of warning that the Swedes do not really understand the concept of a sausage, and the things they call "korv" are to sausages what Jamiroquai is to Miles Davis.

You can't buy any alcohol stronger than 3.5% in the supermarkets so if you do want a tipple you will need to look out for the state-run Systembolaget shops (green signs with yellow lettering). These are common in the city centre and in the suburbs you'll find them near some of the metro stations. They probably wouldn't get away with having the monopoly these days without making sure that the shops were well-stocked and well-run, so fortunately the range is always good and the staff are helpful and know their stuff. Expect to pay 80 crowns (about £7) or upwards for a good bottle of wine, while beers start at about 20 crowns (£1.50) a bottle, unless you settle for piss-lager.

I'll be back later with sightseeing and shopping info!
Copehead wrote:I have met Gruff Rhys - although he claimed he wasn't and that he couldn't speak Welsh, as I spoke to him in Welsh, but it was him lying bastard.

User avatar
Jimbo
Posts: 14007
Joined: 26 Dec 2009, 21:22

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Jimbo » 15 Jan 2018, 11:59

I hear you can buy dirty magazines there. (Cough.)
persona non grata among those who worship at the altar of conventional wisdom

User avatar
Geezee
Posts: 11979
Joined: 24 Jul 2003, 10:14
Location: Where joy divides into vision

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Geezee » 15 Jan 2018, 13:56

PENK wrote:A word of warning that the Swedes do not really understand the concept of a sausage, and the things they call "korv" are to sausages what Jamiroquai is to Miles Davis.


Although more accurately they are hot dogs and you would never have these in the way you'd eat sausage in the UK - and either way you actually can find some very good ones (especially things like the classic Kebanos) - the main thing to look for would be the percentage of meat in it which is prominently displayed. Swedes have a "delicacy" called tunnbrodsrulle: fry the hot dogs, make some mashed potato, add prawn salad, and wrap it around with "tunnbrod" or thin bread and make sure to add strong (black) mustard - all can easily be made at home or buy from any kiosk.

Another Swedish tradition to buy from supermarket is "pytt i panna". This is small bits of potato and meat and pork. You'd normally have "skivade rodbettor" with this (sliced beetroot in vinegar) and fry an egg. These are typical "husmanskost": peasant food.
Smilies are ON
Flash is OFF
Url is ON

User avatar
Geezee
Posts: 11979
Joined: 24 Jul 2003, 10:14
Location: Where joy divides into vision

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Geezee » 15 Jan 2018, 14:18

Polishgirl wrote:Ok; I'm sticking this on here because it's more likely to be seen than on the World board, and because that's just how I roll.

Next holiday with my trusty friend looks like being a week in Stockholm ( if I can ever get over my burgeoning fear of flying - no idea where that came from! It's a complete pain in the arse).

It would be great to get some ideas about things to do/visit, especially inside tips from those in the know. We quite like getting out of the city too, so any suggestions for day trips out and about would be very helpful. I'm also wondering exactly how expensive Stockholm is for things like transport, supermarket shopping. We're not big drinkers, and we're not fussed about eating out anywhere fancy at all. I'm looking at finding an Air BNB if possible, because accomm prices certainly seem higher than the average European city break jaunt.

Time wise, looking at mid April to end May.

Thanks chaps.


A few suggestions on itinerary
- a cruise in the archipelago. You can do anything from day trips/half-day trips/full week trips. Almost all of them leave from Strandvagen and are very easy to organise (on the spot).
- museums. My favourite is probably either Millesgarden or Artipelag, both of which are a bit off the beaten track - best reached either by Uber or busses (or boat). Carl Milles was a sculptor, and his garden of sculptures is a wonder to wander through. Artipelag is an eccentric pet project of the founder of Babybjorn - a modern art museum set on an island just outside of Stockholm. Inside Stockholm you of course have plenty of museums, and it's worth wandering around Djurgarden, a big island with plenty of museums (Waldemarsudde, which can be reached by tram, is a nice starting point and then work your back) - on Djurgarden you can also find Skansen, Liquor Museum (meant to be surprisingly good but haven't been), the iconic Vasa Museum, the Abba Museum etc. The Modern art museum is on the opposite island, as is the National Museum which is unfortunately closed until the end of the year. If you like photography, you must go to the Fotografiska which is by Slussen (and houses a great restaurant).
- Uppsala or Sigtuna is another nice and simple day out - easily accessible, old student/university/religious towns.
- other: Kulturhuset is a great place to wander around - 5 floors of various exhibitions, library, cafes, places to hang out etc. Unfortunately the old food market (Ostermalmstorg) is being rebuilt but is ready by the end of the year. Gamla Stan (old town) is great but worth having a guide to get a sense of the history. Sodermalm is also a nice place to wander around (I'd try to stay there if i were you) - the old working class district, now home to plenty of cafes, music stores, vintage clothes shops etc.
Smilies are ON
Flash is OFF
Url is ON

User avatar
The Prof
Composing a revolutionary symphony
Posts: 44923
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 18:32
Location: A Metropolis of Discontent

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby The Prof » 15 Jan 2018, 16:18

Geezee wrote:Liquor Museum (meant to be surprisingly good but haven't been),.


Yeh - it's OK. You can sniff lots of whiskeys and gins if that's your thing. Skansen is the best open air museum but all the ones in that area are covered be a Museum Pass so it's free in EXCEPT the Abba museum!

User avatar
Minnie the Minx
funky thigh collector
Posts: 28870
Joined: 29 Dec 2006, 16:00
Location: In the naughty North and in the sexy South

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Minnie the Minx » 15 Jan 2018, 16:28

PENK wrote:
Polishgirl wrote: I'm also wondering exactly how expensive Stockholm is for things like transport, supermarket shopping. We're not big drinkers, and we're not fussed about eating out anywhere fancy at all.


OK, let's get the bad news out of the way first: it's pretty expensive.

Transport tickets have just had yet another price hike - yep, they have privatisation in Sweden too! - and a weekly ticket will now cost you about £30. It does get you on all of the metro lines, buses, trams, commuter trains and even inner-city ferries too, so there is that, and the coverage is good and (largely) reliable.

Supermarket shopping is pricey too, for someone not on Nordic wages. The two main chains are ICA and Coop (basically the Co-Op) and you'll also see Hemköp and the cheaper Willys and ubiquitous Lidl amongst others. ICA and Coop - the bigger stores at least - are usually well-stocked with good-quality produce and have plenty of variety. Again, it's expensive, but a good rule of thumb is the bigger the branch, the better the range and the lower the prices.
Traditional Swedish food itself usually involves boiled potatoes. Many Swedes have realised that this kind of thing is a bit boring, and started adding more modern, international ingredients and styles, which is welcome, so you will now find good cuts of meat, plenty of fresh veg and so on. They are very big on their organic stuff here too. The "international food" section normally involves lots of Tex-Mex stuff, some Thai sauces and spices, and a couple of packets of naan bread, but if you go to the bigger branches you'll find things you need.
A word of warning that the Swedes do not really understand the concept of a sausage, and the things they call "korv" are to sausages what Jamiroquai is to Miles Davis.

You can't buy any alcohol stronger than 3.5% in the supermarkets so if you do want a tipple you will need to look out for the state-run Systembolaget shops (green signs with yellow lettering). These are common in the city centre and in the suburbs you'll find them near some of the metro stations. They probably wouldn't get away with having the monopoly these days without making sure that the shops were well-stocked and well-run, so fortunately the range is always good and the staff are helpful and know their stuff. Expect to pay 80 crowns (about £7) or upwards for a good bottle of wine, while beers start at about 20 crowns (£1.50) a bottle, unless you settle for piss-lager.

I'll be back later with sightseeing and shopping info!


I'm laughing as your post is a more detailed summary of my time there which was:

1. Land. Immediately say, 'HOW FUCKING MUCH IS THAT?'
2.look for booze. Yell out 'WHAT DO YOU MEAN THEY ONLY SELL IT IN ONE SHOP?'
3. Sit in restaurant hungry with lettuce being only option

I also got invited to take part in a threesome by a polite couple in a bar and got attacked by swans when I went swimming in a lake.

Otherwise it were ace!
You come at the Queen, you best not miss.

Dr Markus wrote:
Someone in your line of work usually as their own man cave aka the shed we're they can potter around fixing stuff or something don't they?

User avatar
ConnyOlivetti
Probing The Sonic Heritage
Posts: 9800
Joined: 06 Nov 2003, 07:14
Location: Below The North Pole
Contact:

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 16 Jan 2018, 09:30

Geezee wrote:
PENK wrote:A word of warning that the Swedes do not really understand the concept of a sausage, and the things they call "korv" are to sausages what Jamiroquai is to Miles Davis.


Although more accurately they are hot dogs and you would never have these in the way you'd eat sausage in the UK -


Well, correct in a way,
but you got the Falukorv, which can be strange for others
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falukorv
never/ever wrote:the BCB-universe...may it continue to piss Coan off ad infinitum.


Un enfant dans electronica!
Je suis!

User avatar
Geezee
Posts: 11979
Joined: 24 Jul 2003, 10:14
Location: Where joy divides into vision

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Geezee » 16 Jan 2018, 09:35

Yes, Falukorv are sausages - and quite good ones at that (or can be at least) - I was assuming though that Penk meant more the daily "korv" that are everpresent in Sweden which are hot dogs (or frankfurters).
Smilies are ON
Flash is OFF
Url is ON

User avatar
Jimbo
Posts: 14007
Joined: 26 Dec 2009, 21:22

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Jimbo » 16 Jan 2018, 11:22

Try the herring.
persona non grata among those who worship at the altar of conventional wisdom

User avatar
ConnyOlivetti
Probing The Sonic Heritage
Posts: 9800
Joined: 06 Nov 2003, 07:14
Location: Below The North Pole
Contact:

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 16 Jan 2018, 11:37

Jimbo wrote:Try the herring.


With Snaps! "Nubbe" :D
never/ever wrote:the BCB-universe...may it continue to piss Coan off ad infinitum.


Un enfant dans electronica!
Je suis!

User avatar
PENK
Midnight to Six Man
Posts: 33872
Joined: 07 Aug 2004, 20:12
Location: Stockholm

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby PENK » 16 Jan 2018, 12:40

Geezee wrote:Yes, Falukorv are sausages - and quite good ones at that (or can be at least) - I was assuming though that Penk meant more the daily "korv" that are everpresent in Sweden which are hot dogs (or frankfurters).


No, I included falukorv. Horrible things for anyone reared on proper British bangers. And don’t get me started on ”korvstroganoff”!
Copehead wrote:I have met Gruff Rhys - although he claimed he wasn't and that he couldn't speak Welsh, as I spoke to him in Welsh, but it was him lying bastard.

User avatar
Harvey K-Tel
Long Player
Posts: 39075
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 23:20
Location: 1220 on your AM dial

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 16 Jan 2018, 13:54

I recommend the meatballs.
If you've got nothing to do, don't do it here.

User avatar
Geezee
Posts: 11979
Joined: 24 Jul 2003, 10:14
Location: Where joy divides into vision

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby Geezee » 16 Jan 2018, 13:57

PENK wrote:
Geezee wrote:Yes, Falukorv are sausages - and quite good ones at that (or can be at least) - I was assuming though that Penk meant more the daily "korv" that are everpresent in Sweden which are hot dogs (or frankfurters).


No, I included falukorv. Horrible things for anyone reared on proper British bangers. And don’t get me started on ”korvstroganoff”!


Although thinking about it, falukorv is more like salami. Either way, Swedish hot dogs are a must, ideally with prawn salad or "boston gurka"!
Smilies are ON
Flash is OFF
Url is ON

User avatar
ConnyOlivetti
Probing The Sonic Heritage
Posts: 9800
Joined: 06 Nov 2003, 07:14
Location: Below The North Pole
Contact:

Re: Stockholm tips please

Postby ConnyOlivetti » 16 Jan 2018, 14:11

Geezee wrote:
PENK wrote:
Geezee wrote:Yes, Falukorv are sausages - and quite good ones at that (or can be at least) - I was assuming though that Penk meant more the daily "korv" that are everpresent in Sweden which are hot dogs (or frankfurters).


No, I included falukorv. Horrible things for anyone reared on proper British bangers. And don’t get me started on ”korvstroganoff”!


Although thinking about it, falukorv is more like salami. Either way, Swedish hot dogs are a must, ideally with prawn salad or "boston gurka"!


You are kidding, are you not?
never/ever wrote:the BCB-universe...may it continue to piss Coan off ad infinitum.


Un enfant dans electronica!
Je suis!