Where you live

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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K
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Re: Where you live

Postby K » 11 Apr 2017, 09:02

Nick wrote:Stretford, south Manchester. We bought a three-bedroomed Victorian town house about eighteen months ago, it needs a bit of work but nothing too big – or at least, we haven't yet found anything too big that needs doing.

It's an OK area to live in, not the nicest part of the city, but far from being the worst either. Our neighbours are fine and although we're on a fairly busy road, it's a solid house and we've got double-glazing so we hardly notice it. We've got decent public transport easily available, and I can commute to work in Salford in under an hour.

Manchester's a good city to live in, a variety of decent pubs & restaurants, plenty of access to culture including art galleries, theatres and music venues, and almost everybody plays Manchester these days, so we can see pretty much every touring band or artist we want to. And we're only half an hour from the city centre by public transport, or ten minutes' drive, so that's very convenient, plus we're not far from the suburb of Chorlton which has some good restaurants, although it is infested with hipster idiots. But Altrincham's not far the other way out of the city, and there are some nice places to go out there as well.

People are generally pretty friendly, and it's a place with a fascinating history. My wife's lived here since the mid-90s, I've been here about four and a half years. We won't stay for ever, but we’ll probably be here at least another half-dozen years or so, maybe a bit more.

Negative things? A lot of Manchester natives are hopelessly hung up on the city's musical past, especially obsessed with the whole Madchester era and Britpop. The whole lairy Manc wide-boy swagger thing gets on my nerves, although to be honest you don’t see that much of it these days.

I've very little interest in football, so I sometimes struggle with chatting about it, in Manchester it's probably the most common thing to make small talk about.

The metrolink is just brilliant now, although it is bizarre the journey I would need to do to get to the airport if I went by tram.
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Harvey K-Tel
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Re: Where you live

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 13 Apr 2017, 14:22

A store just opened up near me called "Perfectly Uncomplicated Lattes".
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The Great Defector
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Re: Where you live

Postby The Great Defector » 13 Apr 2017, 14:26

Harvey K-Tel wrote:A store just opened up near me called "Perfectly Uncomplicated Lattes".


Kinda sounds like the McDonalds ad over here for coffee.

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Re: Where you live

Postby NMB » 13 Apr 2017, 14:39

Harvey K-Tel wrote:A store just opened up near me called "Perfectly Uncomplicated Lattes".


What does it sell?
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Harvey K-Tel
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Re: Where you live

Postby Harvey K-Tel » 13 Apr 2017, 14:41

NMB wrote:
Harvey K-Tel wrote:A store just opened up near me called "Perfectly Uncomplicated Lattes".


What does it sell?


Not sure. Haven't been in yet, but I'm kinda hoping for tacos.
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Still Baron
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Re: Where you live

Postby Still Baron » 18 Apr 2017, 03:41

Do you like it?

I live in Austin. I mean, yeah, I like it. But it's pretty complicated.

What do you like about it?

I grew up 60 miles from here (which, around here, isn't far). I've lived in other parts of the State and on the east coast, and I've spent a fair few months of my life in New Orleans and the north of England. So I know enough to know that, as a matter of understanding the lay of the land and the people, with the exception of San Antonio, this is as close to "home" as I'll ever have. That easy familiarity with the place you come from counts for a lot. Also, when I was a kid, this is always where I thought I would be (unless lightning struck and I made it to New York or whatever). Since then, my horizons have spread, and there are many other places I think about being. Austin, and south/central Texas have undergone explosive growth and a tremendous influx of money over the past 20 years or so, so in many ways, this part of the world has changed under my nose in ways that make it barely recognizable. But there are still good record stores and video stores, Austin has an excellent movie scene, and of course there's always the live music and the University. There's more and more interesting food and now you can get good coffee and good local beer. These are all good things. Also, my wife really likes it here, and some of my favorite family members live here.

What pisses you off?

I've tried to roll with the changes as best I can---it's inevitable and there ARE positives. Despite wanting to be here for most of my life and feeling as familiar with it as a kid from Jersey or Connecticut feels about New York City, I only managed to move here about nine years ago, when I was in my mid 30s. But the city has changed radically, and the speed of change only increases. More and more people live here, the infrastructure is really strained, and the place I wanted to be doesn't exist anymore. When we used to talk about American cities on the boards, Martha would say that Austin was like West Berlin, stuck in the old East Germany. It was a strong analogy, and I wouldn't quarrel with it. But Austin was always a place made by Texans, and was plainly of Texas---you couldn't really separate one from the other. The problem is that the interconnectedness between Austin and the rest of the State seems really strained in this era of polarization. Texas has always been conservative, of course, but with the renewed vigor of the culture wars and gerrymandering, the right wing has become totally unhinged, and there's a lot of ugliness out there. At the same time, Austin seems more like a bubble than ever before, and as younger generations take over,
it becomes more and more incomprehensible to me. There is so much migration from out of state, there is so much money here, so many people who have no connection to the rest of Texas. It really is like living in a big bubble, and the reduced influence of people from other parts of Texas has diminished the essence of the town that I knew from when I was younger. I try to embrace the change and the new things, but I almost feel like an alien in my own place. I can't imagine how the old hippies who have been here for 50 years feel. The other sources of my alienation include the outrageous price of real estate and the stupid Texas weather (no seasons, six months of summer brutality). I'm done with heat.

Would you love to live somewhere else?

Yeah, any number of places. Min still has a place in Lancashire, and it often feels like I have more of a social life in England than I do here (which is an attestation to Min's devotion to her friends and maintaining relationships and my failure to do the same with my people). I like it there and am reasonably certain I would be happy there. For professional reasons, I can't imagine living outside of Texas in the States, but who knows. I couldn't have predicted a lot of this so there's no telling. Nevertheless, I'm still a sixth or seventh generation Native Texan and I feel like I have a stake here, like I need to hang around and work on the place. And the politics will get better.
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Re: Where you live

Postby Jimbo » 18 Apr 2017, 06:55

Just outside my condo building is a street that workers have been widening and straightening for a few years and now they're at the last stage where they are burying the overhead wires. I am afraid, however, that the scene will be a little too clean, too much like a model in an architect's office. The older buildings have been replaced by more modern condos and it isn't the same street we moved onto 15 years or so ago. But if you are into modernization then this is the place to be! When I first moved to the town the trains ran along the street with clanging bells and swivel arms to block traffic. A realtor told us at the time that in 10 years the trains would be elevated so traffic could flow more easily and so would the trains. Sure enough from my window I can see a facsimile of the Roman aqueducts. It really is a marvel I think. This aqueduct goes on for miles and miles freeing up traffic throughout the city. And beneath the tracks are now shops, shaded parks, parking lots, bicycle parking, even day care centers. All the stations along the line are new, sci-fi looking structures with clean toilets, more shopping, more signs in English and Chinese and automated ticket wickets. With the Olympics coming up soon Tokyo is really making an effort to sharpen up its image and they are succeeding --- if you like that sort of thing.
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sloopjohnc
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Re: Where you live

Postby sloopjohnc » 18 Apr 2017, 21:52

Still Baron wrote:Austin, and south/central Texas have undergone explosive growth and a tremendous influx of money over the past 20 years or so, so in many ways, this part of the world has changed under my nose in ways that make it barely recognizable.


My friends and I who live in the Bay Area or who came back to live on the San Francisco Peninsula on trips back say the same thing.

I come back to my hometown every Saturday for guitar lessons and there's always some new cloud computer company putting up a high rise or they're building condos. The biggest buildings when I grew up was the county courthouse and jail.

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Re: Where you live

Postby Polishgirl » 20 Apr 2017, 23:50

Edge of a large village, a couple of miles outside Exeter.

Likes: it's very quiet where we are. The house backs onto a big cottage garden. Neighbours are nice enough. I can see fields from my bedroom window. Only a few miles from the sea. Lots of wildlife, partly because we're close to a RSPB reserve. Great facilities in the village. Exeter is a nice city-compact centre, beautiful Cathedral, plenty of choice re cafes/restaurants/pubs, good independent cinema, comparatively safe.

Dislikes: Exeter is quite isolated- 40 odd miles to the nearest city, and we're talking Plymouth. It takes over an hour just to drive to Bristol, so travelling further afield is a bit of a hike. Despite the large student population ( they're not proper students; they're all very posh and monied), it's not very good for bigger name artists or theatre. There's a busy arts centre in town, but it's a bit trustafarian for my tastes. Significant issues with street homelessness and begging. Far too many aspirational mid-life-crisis men who cycle.

There are plenty of other places I'd like to live. I especially like Shropshire and Herefordshire - very keen on Shrewsbury in particular. I also have a good friend who lives between Halifax/Huddersfield, and it's a great place to be. Also the Sussex/Kent border. And Lancashire, around the Bowland area is a real favourite. I could live up there quite happily. I wouldn't want to be in the midst of a big city, but I like being close to one.
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Re: Where you live

Postby Six String » 21 Apr 2017, 00:14

Michael, being one of those old hippies who wanted the place to hold on to its vibe, I'm crushed to read these thngs though I can see it happening when I am there. I've had thoughts about moving back to Texas when I retire but that would be last resort. I can't deal with the heat either.

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Re: Where you live

Postby Phil T » 21 Apr 2017, 00:38

Polishgirl wrote:Edge of a large village, a couple of miles outside Exeter.

Likes: it's very quiet where we are. The house backs onto a big cottage garden. Neighbours are nice enough. I can see fields from my bedroom window. Only a few miles from the sea. Lots of wildlife, partly because we're close to a RSPB reserve. Great facilities in the village. Exeter is a nice city-compact centre, beautiful Cathedral, plenty of choice re cafes/restaurants/pubs, good independent cinema, comparatively safe.

Dislikes: Exeter is quite isolated- 40 odd miles to the nearest city, and we're talking Plymouth. It takes over an hour just to drive to Bristol, so travelling further afield is a bit of a hike. Despite the large student population ( they're not proper students; they're all very posh and monied), it's not very good for bigger name artists or theatre. There's a busy arts centre in town, but it's a bit trustafarian for my tastes. Significant issues with street homelessness and begging. Far too many aspirational mid-life-crisis men who cycle.


There is little I can add to what the memsahib has written here. One thing I would add, is that coming as I do from arguably one of the most landlocked part of Britain, I still get an almost childlike joy from living only eight miles from the coast. Pippa has said she's possibly a little blase about this aspect of it, having been bought up in Bude.

Other things are dislikes, the major one being that I miss the wider choice of places for even simple facilities like cinema or shopping. My home turf is pretty close to Derby, Nottingham, Sheffield and (God help us) Chesterfield.

I do also miss living in my own house, which I own outright. It's newish, semi-detached, but built more like a townhouse, on three floors, with three bedrooms (actually four in practice). Very light and airy. I can't complain though, it does bring in a few useful quid from rentals.

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Re: Where you live

Postby Jimbo » 21 Apr 2017, 03:13

The Destruction of Inlet Beach

Paul Craig Roberts

Inlet Beach is an old Florida community in Walton County on the Gulf Coast of the panhandle of Florida. The community circa 1950 originated in federal land dispensed via a lottery to WW II veterans. Winners of the lottery received 1.25 acres in exchange for a $50 filing fee and agreement to construct an 800 square foot block house….

http://www.paulcraigroberts.org/2017/04 ... let-beach/
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Re: Where you live

Postby Loki » 21 Apr 2017, 07:31

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Mennonite country. Western Ontario. Watch out for the horse poop.
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Re: Where you live

Postby martha » 24 Apr 2017, 00:13

Still Baron wrote:What pisses you off?

I've tried to roll with the changes as best I can---it's inevitable and there ARE positives. Despite wanting to be here for most of my life and feeling as familiar with it as a kid from Jersey or Connecticut feels about New York City, I only managed to move here about nine years ago, when I was in my mid 30s. But the city has changed radically, and the speed of change only increases. More and more people live here, the infrastructure is really strained, and the place I wanted to be doesn't exist anymore. When we used to talk about American cities on the boards, Martha would say that Austin was like West Berlin, stuck in the old East Germany. It was a strong analogy, and I wouldn't quarrel with it. But Austin was always a place made by Texans, and was plainly of Texas---you couldn't really separate one from the other. The problem is that the interconnectedness between Austin and the rest of the State seems really strained in this era of polarization. Texas has always been conservative, of course, but with the renewed vigor of the culture wars and gerrymandering, the right wing has become totally unhinged, and there's a lot of ugliness out there. At the same time, Austin seems more like a bubble than ever before, and as younger generations take over,
it becomes more and more incomprehensible to me. There is so much migration from out of state, there is so much money here, so many people who have no connection to the rest of Texas. It really is like living in a big bubble, and the reduced influence of people from other parts of Texas has diminished the essence of the town that I knew from when I was younger. I try to embrace the change and the new things, but I almost feel like an alien in my own place. I can't imagine how the old hippies who have been here for 50 years feel.


I can see a parallel here in the area of Montana that I live in Baron. The town of Whitefish used to be a bit of a liberal ski town but very much small town Montana. The influx of wealthy retirees from the West and East Coast like my husband's parents in the 1990's started to change the place in the 1990's, it brought a bit of diversity first and foremost, socially and economically, and with that it started to lose its small town charm, and have a rift with the rest of the state in a similar manner to the way you describe. There's a lot of hate directed at it as a community so you get these nutjobs like Richard Spencer suddenly taking residence and stirring shit up with the locals.

The polarization causes problems everywhere. It's the harbinger of the fall I think if the current administration is any example of our future.
--m.

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Re: Where you live

Postby pcqgod » 24 Apr 2017, 00:18

I love south Texas, but I hate the ugly little towns and neighborhoods you find in this area, and the general lack of winter weather. I'd move somewhere else in a heartbeat if I could find a job elsewhere.
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Still Baron
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Re: Where you live

Postby Still Baron » 24 Apr 2017, 23:39

"Nobody goes there anymore, it's too crowded."

:(

https://m.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2 ... &s=Economy
toomanyhatz wrote:I honestly don't care for most Beach Boys car songs

take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.

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Re: Where you live

Postby sloopjohnc » 25 Apr 2017, 00:02

Still Baron wrote:"Nobody goes there anymore, it's too crowded."

:(

https://m.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2 ... &s=Economy


Here's why. I saw today on news that a family of four qualifies as low income if they make under $100,000 and live in San Francisco. $80,000 for the county I live in, Alameda.
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Re: Where you live

Postby PresMuffley » 25 Apr 2017, 04:15

pcqgod wrote:I love south Texas, but I hate the ugly little towns and neighborhoods you find in this area, and the general lack of winter weather. I'd move somewhere else in a heartbeat if I could find a job elsewhere.


Is there a dwindling job market for attorneys these days?
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pcqgod
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Re: Where you live

Postby pcqgod » 26 Apr 2017, 03:42

PresMuffley wrote:
pcqgod wrote:I love south Texas, but I hate the ugly little towns and neighborhoods you find in this area, and the general lack of winter weather. I'd move somewhere else in a heartbeat if I could find a job elsewhere.


Is there a dwindling job market for attorneys these days?


In my area, possibly. It's been a while since I've put myself on the market, but that might change pretty soon.
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Re: Where you live

Postby Goat Boy » 27 Apr 2017, 09:26

I love Edinburgh. Moving here has been, undoubtedly, one of the best things I have done in my life. It’s a beautiful city. The location is wonderful, the Georgian architecture and atmosphere is great. When the sunshine is out (it happens) it sorta glows. It even looks good when the weather is crap which is helpful. I like its size. It’s not too big but big enough to have all the benefits of living in a decent sized city. In fact it probably punches above its weight in most areas. There’s loads of good restaurants, a couple of good cinemas to serve my film needs and you’ve got the festival too even if I couldn’t really give a damn about it really. The Edinburgh international film festival is more up my street. The only real downside to me is the lack of gigs but I’m also at the age where my tolerance of gigs is pretty low anyway so I’m less fussed about this. Kraftwerk are still playing here in June, Sparks too so you still get opportunities, just not as many as Glasgow. I know some people really dislike the gentrification of the festival but then it doesn't interest me that much anyway.

On the downside property isn’t cheap. The trams have slowed down the buses so my daily commute is longer than ever but that is a small thing of course. The bus service in the city is the best I've ever come across actually. Town is crazy during the summer when the tourists kick in but I only leave Leith if I really have to so I avoid all of that nonsense.

I feel very lucky to live here. It makes such a difference living somewhere you really like.
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