quick language question

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks
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Count Machuki
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Re: quick language question

Postby Count Machuki » 01 Feb 2017, 21:08

Minnie Cheddars wrote:An International Cunt Circus


I think they prefer to be called The United Nations
Let U be the set of all united sets, K be the set of the kids and D be the set of things divided.
Then it follows that ∀ k ∈ K: K ∈ U ⇒ k ∉ D

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Re: quick language question

Postby sloopjohnc » 01 Feb 2017, 23:10

Goat Boy wrote:"and one student each from..."?


Bingo.
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Re: quick language question

Postby echolalia » 01 Feb 2017, 23:31

THE OXFORD BLACON wrote:It's not like I'm particularly PC. But you don't say 'Greek', or 'Turk', or 'Scot' or whatever in these contexts. It just sounds ugly.

Online news and the “ticker” thing have opened new cans of worms:

Irishman injured in air crash
vs.
Irish man hurt in bar incident

or

English man dies of stiff upper lip
vs.
Englishman hits Euro parliament for six

etc. I dunno!

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Re: quick language question

Postby **NOW PLAYING** » 01 Feb 2017, 23:33

I think those one-word forms are slowly disappearing. It's an odd one. But you'd never say 'Jew', would you?

The Czechs still say Rus (for 'Russian') and it's used pejoratively, I feel.
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Re: quick language question

Postby bhoywonder » 02 Feb 2017, 10:18

I think it's fine to say Turk, personally, just as I would happily say Scot. A Turk or a Scot is no different to an American, a Brit, a New Zealander or an Iraqi, is it? Some nationalities don't have these terms – you couldn't say a French, or an English, for example, but you could say a German.

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Re: quick language question

Postby bhoywonder » 02 Feb 2017, 10:20

I think the only real reason we generally wouldn't say 'a Jew' is because historically there have been issues with that term being used with a negative undertone. I've noticed it being used a bit more of late, though, albeit generally alongside a Muslim or a Christian, when talking about religious prejudice.

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Re: quick language question

Postby northernsky » 09 Feb 2017, 12:39

I would love to get opinions from the BCB rapid response unit on the following sentences:

An important extension of this is to investigate how such shifts in plant community might propagate to the functioning of the entire ecosystem.

I discuss how the response of the plant community can propagate to effects on ecosystem functions.


I am dubious about "propagate to", particularly in the first one. I would prefer "extend to" but "extension" has already been used. "affect the functioning" sounds more correct to me, if more dull. Any suggestions welcome...

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Re: quick language question

Postby **NOW PLAYING** » 09 Feb 2017, 12:45

'might impact (up)on' ?
The Great Defector wrote:Do mean films that would go down as the one of the best ever type of films?

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Re: quick language question

Postby northernsky » 09 Feb 2017, 13:44

Larson E. Whipsnade wrote:'might impact (up)on' ?


Cheers! Yes, that's better.

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Re: quick language question

Postby Robert » 09 Feb 2017, 14:04

Larson E. Whipsnade wrote:
Harvey K-Tel wrote:
THE OXFORD BLACON wrote:
'Turk' to me sounds a bit like 'Jew' - I'm not comfortable with it.


Oh boo hoo.


Why that?

It's not like I'm particularly PC. But you don't say 'Greek', or 'Turk', or 'Scot' or whatever in these contexts. It just sounds ugly.


I half/half agree but what about a German, a Brit, an Italian? It looks like the examples you give have a sound/feel that make them half offensive!

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Re: quick language question

Postby Robert » 09 Feb 2017, 14:06

Larson E. Whipsnade wrote:'might impact (up)on' ?


Hey Whipsnade, haven't I seen you a argue before that 'impact' is not a verb ? It may have been someone else but I would agree with the notion.

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Re: quick language question

Postby echolalia » 09 Feb 2017, 14:59

northernsky wrote:I would love to get opinions from the BCB rapid response unit on the following sentences:

An important extension of this is to investigate how such shifts in plant community might propagate to the functioning of the entire ecosystem.

I discuss how the response of the plant community can propagate to effects on ecosystem functions.


I am dubious about "propagate to", particularly in the first one. I would prefer "extend to" but "extension" has already been used. "affect the functioning" sounds more correct to me, if more dull. Any suggestions welcome...

“Extension” is a bit iffy anyway: maybe you should change it (for something like corollary or upshot, depending on what “this” refers to) and then you could have “extend to” where you want it.

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Re: quick language question

Postby Quaco » 09 Feb 2017, 16:23

Robert wrote:
Larson E. Whipsnade wrote:'might impact (up)on' ?


Hey Whipsnade, haven't I seen you a argue before that 'impact' is not a verb ? It may have been someone else but I would agree with the notion.

"Have an impact upon" is better than using "impact" as a verb, which still sounds like ad/office jargon ... to some of us at least.
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Re: quick language question

Postby sloopjohnc » 10 Feb 2017, 00:25

Quacoan wrote:"Have an impact upon" is better than using "impact" as a verb, which still sounds like ad/office jargon ... to some of us at least.


It does to me. What happened to "affected?"
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Re: quick language question

Postby Still Baron » 10 Feb 2017, 00:27

sloopjohnc wrote:
Quacoan wrote:"Have an impact upon" is better than using "impact" as a verb, which still sounds like ad/office jargon ... to some of us at least.


It does to me. What happened to "affected?"


Using "impact" cuts people loose from having to figure out whether to write affect or effect.
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Re: quick language question

Postby northernsky » 10 Feb 2017, 09:06

echolalia wrote:“Extension” is a bit iffy anyway: maybe you should change it (for something like corollary or upshot, depending on what “this” refers to) and then you could have “extend to” where you want it.


Thanks! The original paragraph was:

A better understanding of the effects of above- and belowground herbivory on plant competition will likely shed light on the mechanisms that underlie shifts in plant communities undergoing nitrogen eutrophication. An important extension of this is to investigate how such plant community shifts might propagate to the functioning of the entire ecosystem.


(I'm taking out "plant community" in the 2nd sentence because I think that's understood, and it's wordy enough as it is).
So she is trying to extend/expand (?) the focus of the study from one level (plant response) to a higher level (ecosystem).
And, as far as I can, I want to avoid both noun "effects" and verb "affects" as far as I can because they are all over the text anyway.
I have suggested "....might perturb the functioning..." but that has other connotations, and I might not be able to sneak it past the goalkeeper.

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Re: quick language question

Postby Deebank » 10 Feb 2017, 09:19

Larson E. Whipsnade wrote:I think those one-word forms are slowly disappearing. It's an odd one. But you'd never say 'Jew', would you?


Well, Jew is an ethnicity or religion rather than a nationality. You haver to ask yourself what bearing the person's ethnicity has on what it is you're trying to say and if it has none, why bother mentioning it?
Paid anghofio fod dy galon yn y chwyldro

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Count Machuki
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Re: quick language question

Postby Count Machuki » 10 Feb 2017, 18:00

They said TURKS probably twenty times on public radio yesterday.
My ears!
Let U be the set of all united sets, K be the set of the kids and D be the set of things divided.
Then it follows that ∀ k ∈ K: K ∈ U ⇒ k ∉ D

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Re: quick language question

Postby K » 10 Feb 2017, 20:25

Why did Constantinople get the works?
That's nobody's business but the Turks.
Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
I assume this is one of Gash's 'jests'

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Re: quick language question

Postby Deebank » 10 Feb 2017, 20:33

Shouldn't there be an apostrophe on the end of Turks?
Paid anghofio fod dy galon yn y chwyldro


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