California v Texas

in reality, all of this has been a total load of old bollocks

California v Texas

1. California
10
67%
2. Texas
5
33%
 
Total votes: 15

User avatar
der nister
Posts: 15564
Joined: 30 Sep 2008, 18:42

Re: California v Texas

Postby der nister » 31 May 2014, 01:52

Nolamike wrote:Then sad thing is, Texas produced one of THE great presidents only 50 years ago.


LBJ?

Do your parents know you're saying this?

I happen to agree, but it's NOT a popular perception.
It's kinda depressing for a music forum to be proud of not knowing musicians.

User avatar
Matt Wilson
Psychedelic Cowpunk
Posts: 30784
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 20:18
Location: Edge of a continent

Re: California v Texas

Postby Matt Wilson » 31 May 2014, 02:12

Can you get a good curry in Texas?

Anna should do a Texas vs. the UK thread to really know where she's coming from.
"The reason I say Trump won is that he came across as more confident, quicker-witted."
-John Coan on the Presidential debate

User avatar
T. Willy Rye
Spinner of crazy fuck-ass shit
Posts: 3815
Joined: 30 Jan 2010, 21:41
Location: Fogertyland

Re: California v Texas

Postby T. Willy Rye » 31 May 2014, 02:27

Baron of the Flies wrote:
The Coan Gang wrote:Which, if either, has the death penalty?


You'll be glad to know that they both do.


California's only executed 13 people in the last 40 years and none in the last 8. Texas tops that in a couple months.

User avatar
Loki
The Goddess of Mischief
Posts: 16204
Joined: 18 Sep 2010, 06:34

Re: California v Texas

Postby Loki » 31 May 2014, 03:17

Baron of the Flies wrote:California has more stunning beauty and nice weather. Texas has soul.

Yeah. Kinda impossible for me to choose.
Image


whodathunkit wrote: Somewhere it's always 1972.

User avatar
Loki
The Goddess of Mischief
Posts: 16204
Joined: 18 Sep 2010, 06:34

Re: California v Texas

Postby Loki » 31 May 2014, 03:19

never/ever wrote:
I'm eyeballing Austin for Psychfest 2015.

Do yourself a favour. Austin is fantastic.
Image


whodathunkit wrote: Somewhere it's always 1972.

User avatar
Dr. Baron
Diamond Geezer
Posts: 44403
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 05:38
Location: Impregnable Citadel of Technicality

Re: California v Texas

Postby Dr. Baron » 31 May 2014, 03:37

T. Willy Rye wrote:
Baron of the Flies wrote:
The Coan Gang wrote:Which, if either, has the death penalty?


You'll be glad to know that they both do.


California's only executed 13 people in the last 40 years and none in the last 8. Texas tops that in a couple months.


Just answering the question asked.

I would be shocked to learn that Griff, a European, didn't know Texas had the death penalty and has executed many people.
Quaco wrote:Are you fucking high?
take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.
GoogaMooga wrote:It's a film I have waited 39 years to see. Now I have the chance, but I may just crap out.

Conrad Knight Socks
Poptastic
Posts: 14766
Joined: 05 Jul 2004, 22:01

Re: California v Texas

Postby Conrad Knight Socks » 31 May 2014, 09:44

Give me San Diego over Dallas any day.
I kept thinking "swim as far as you can, swim as far as you can".

User avatar
GoogaMooga
custodian of oldies
Posts: 27266
Joined: 28 Sep 2010, 05:23
Location: Denmark

Re: California v Texas

Postby GoogaMooga » 31 May 2014, 15:12

Mike Love wrote The California Myth. Who wrote The Texas Myth? When I was a little boy, though, I equated Texas with cowboys. Ask any Danish boy in the 1960s what Texas meant to him and the answer would be cowboys.
"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

User avatar
Dr. Baron
Diamond Geezer
Posts: 44403
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 05:38
Location: Impregnable Citadel of Technicality

Re: California v Texas

Postby Dr. Baron » 31 May 2014, 15:22

99 wrote:Give me San Diego over Dallas any day.


Me too, I suspect.
Quaco wrote:Are you fucking high?
take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.
GoogaMooga wrote:It's a film I have waited 39 years to see. Now I have the chance, but I may just crap out.

User avatar
Dr. Baron
Diamond Geezer
Posts: 44403
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 05:38
Location: Impregnable Citadel of Technicality

Re: California v Texas

Postby Dr. Baron » 31 May 2014, 15:26

GoogaMooga wrote:Mike Love wrote The California Myth. Who wrote The Texas Myth? When I was a little boy, though, I equated Texas with cowboys. Ask any Danish boy in the 1960s what Texas meant to him and the answer would be cowboys.


I think The California Myth was written long before Mike Love was around. There's a long (and fascinating) tradition of California boosterism and myth making. But that's OK---no doubt the Beach Boys amplified it greatly.

I don't know that any one person or thing is singularly responsible for establishing the mythic image of Texas (cowboys and the like). Movies and music, I reckon. But the Texas Revolution as an origin story for modern Texas is pretty potent material.
Quaco wrote:Are you fucking high?
take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.
GoogaMooga wrote:It's a film I have waited 39 years to see. Now I have the chance, but I may just crap out.

User avatar
GoogaMooga
custodian of oldies
Posts: 27266
Joined: 28 Sep 2010, 05:23
Location: Denmark

Re: California v Texas

Postby GoogaMooga » 31 May 2014, 15:56

Baron of the Flies wrote:
GoogaMooga wrote:Mike Love wrote The California Myth. Who wrote The Texas Myth? When I was a little boy, though, I equated Texas with cowboys. Ask any Danish boy in the 1960s what Texas meant to him and the answer would be cowboys.


I think The California Myth was written long before Mike Love was around. There's a long (and fascinating) tradition of California boosterism and myth making. But that's OK---no doubt the Beach Boys amplified it greatly.

I don't know that any one person or thing is singularly responsible for establishing the mythic image of Texas (cowboys and the like). Movies and music, I reckon. But the Texas Revolution as an origin story for modern Texas is pretty potent material.


Recuerden El Alamo! 8-)
"When the desert comes, people will be sad; just as Cannery Row was sad when all the pilchards were caught and canned and eaten." - John Steinbeck

User avatar
Dr. Baron
Diamond Geezer
Posts: 44403
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 05:38
Location: Impregnable Citadel of Technicality

Re: California v Texas

Postby Dr. Baron » 31 May 2014, 17:16

Anyway, I'm obviously from Texas and am a fifth or sixth generation native. I love it, but it's really gone nuts in the past ten or fifteen years. This has culminated in our recent primaries where the tea party trounced the establishment Republicans. There's a lot of talk about how the demographics are changing and how the politics will follow, and I believe that. But for now, it's a race to a bottom that keeps getting lower and lower. Texas has 13.6 million registered voters, but the winner of the most recent primary runoff for Lieutenant Governor (historically the seat of the most practical power in the state) earned votes from only 3.5% of those voters. Admittedly, that is a primary runoff, but unless the Democrats show up big in November and beat the Republicans for the first time in decades (there's a very outside chance), those voters had an outsized influence in the makeup, conduct, and tenor of our state government.

My point? Yes, Texas has always been relatively conservative. But recent politicians and laws aren't necessarily a reflection of the actual attitudes of a majority of Texans. But that same majority tolerates a tiny vocal minority of wingnuts and enables them by not participating. It's depressing, to say the least. Texas has huge problems, including the future for water and transportation infrastructure, but the politicians aren't interested in spending any money and are, in fact, hell bent on slashing an already spartan state government.

In the meantime, Central Texas and the Houston area are booming, and the state is changing rapidly. I'm of two minds about it, as the part of the state I grew up in is nearly unrecognizable and I'm sentimental, but much of the growth is ultimately good, as it is bringing more diversity and the urban areas are increasingly cosmopolitan. It's going to change more and more, and that promises to be a fascinating prospect. The story is always much more complex than the caricature---even our criminal justice system, which is easily lampooned for a few reasons, is quite progressive for a few others. I imagine we'll be here for awhile, but I would be perfectly happy in the UK, or California, or a few other places. Even when the population catches up with the politics (and I DO believe that the latest round of right wing demagoguery will be their death rattle), I'll still have the bad taste in my mouth from the last few years and some of the very nasty shit I've seen from a small minority of my fellow Texans.

I've posted this before, but it's a quick story about how a county south of Houston/Harris County is now, by some measures, the most diverse area in the country (which actually means that, "this county southwest of Houston comes closer than any other county in the United States to having an equal division among the nation’s four major ethnic communities — Asian, black, Latino and white residents.")

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/24/us/wh ... .html?_r=0
Quaco wrote:Are you fucking high?
take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.
GoogaMooga wrote:It's a film I have waited 39 years to see. Now I have the chance, but I may just crap out.

sloopjohnc
Posts: 63921
Joined: 03 Jun 2004, 20:12

Re: California v Texas

Postby sloopjohnc » 31 May 2014, 17:27

Baron of the Flies wrote:California has more stunning beauty and nice weather. Texas has soul.


It's even in a commercial. . .

Don't fake the funk on a nasty dunk!

sloopjohnc
Posts: 63921
Joined: 03 Jun 2004, 20:12

Re: California v Texas

Postby sloopjohnc » 31 May 2014, 17:41

I'm currently re-reading a history of California by historian Kevin Starr. The history of most states is pretty interesting, but in my mind California is particularly interesting because it became so big so fast.

Beginning in the Gold Rush and continuing through the Internet/social media/biotech/you name it, it's still the place that represents "Go west, young man," to make your fortune. Texas, particularly Austin, is now that place too.

People still come here in droves from all over the country and the world and Silicon Valley where I live is a prime destination. Someone from Ukiah, to name a town up north, wouldn't have that perspective, I presume.

I'm a fourth or fifth generation Californian on my Dad's side from his mom. But my other family is kinda typical of Californians. My mom's parents both came from Sweden and my dad's dad came here from Hawaii.

My ex-wife and every one of my former in-laws live in California but are from somewhere else.

I bet if you stood on the corner of Fifth and Market in San Francisco and asked 10 people where they were from, more than half would be from other countries or states.

That wouldn't be necessarily true in Ukiah.
Don't fake the funk on a nasty dunk!

User avatar
Dr. Baron
Diamond Geezer
Posts: 44403
Joined: 18 Jul 2003, 05:38
Location: Impregnable Citadel of Technicality

Re: California v Texas

Postby Dr. Baron » 31 May 2014, 17:45

I've dabbled, to use a loose term loosely, in California history, and it's absolutely fascinating. I know Mike Davis's books are controversial (or not universally lauded), but City of Quartz and Ecology of Fear (both about southern CA and LA) shaped the way I see things in a lot of ways. I would recommend them. I've started California: The Great Exception more times than I could count, but I'm gonna get back into it soon.
Quaco wrote:Are you fucking high?
take5_d_shorterer wrote:If John Bonham simply didn't listen to enough Tommy Johnson or Blind Willie Mctell, that's his doing.
GoogaMooga wrote:It's a film I have waited 39 years to see. Now I have the chance, but I may just crap out.

sloopjohnc
Posts: 63921
Joined: 03 Jun 2004, 20:12

Re: California v Texas

Postby sloopjohnc » 31 May 2014, 18:58

I work in Fremont and my kids and ex-wife live there. It's named after John C. Fremont, a very significant figure in the history of California.

His Wikipedia entry is pretty interesting: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Fr%C3%A9mont
Don't fake the funk on a nasty dunk!

Conrad Knight Socks
Poptastic
Posts: 14766
Joined: 05 Jul 2004, 22:01

Re: California v Texas

Postby Conrad Knight Socks » 31 May 2014, 19:20

Good post about Texas, Baron.

General Sherman's memoirs are very interesting about the Calif gold rush.
I kept thinking "swim as far as you can, swim as far as you can".

User avatar
Samoan
Posts: 11297
Joined: 28 May 2008, 10:22
Location: The Glad Tidings Mission Hall

Re: California v Texas

Postby Samoan » 31 May 2014, 20:48

Image
Nonsense to the aggressiveness, I've seen more aggression on the my little pony message board......I mean I was told.

User avatar
toomanyhatz
Power-mad king of the WCC
Posts: 29127
Joined: 07 Apr 2005, 00:01
Location: Just east of where Charlie Parker went to do some relaxin'

Re: California v Texas

Postby toomanyhatz » 31 May 2014, 22:33

Baron of the Flies wrote:I've dabbled, to use a loose term loosely, in California history, and it's absolutely fascinating. I know Mike Davis's books are controversial (or not universally lauded), but City of Quartz and Ecology of Fear (both about southern CA and LA) shaped the way I see things in a lot of ways. I would recommend them. I've started California: The Great Exception more times than I could count, but I'm gonna get back into it soon.


I second that emotion re: Davis. I loved 'Ecology of Fear' in particular. Californians have a grand tradition of life "in the face of adversity," said adversity basically being nature acting in a completely expected way.

Los Angeles, the city I've recently fled, is only an ideal place for a city as far as its proximity to what is possibly the largest variety of climate of any major city in the world. The fact that it's built on a fault line that's constantly moving beneath them, and is expected to hit hugely populated areas any day now, bothers the residents only after they're forced to deal with it.
Jimbo wrote: I have just shown...


Jimbo wrote:There goes that conspiracy theory.


1959 1963 1965 1966 1974 1977 1978 1981 1988 2017* 2018 2020!! 2021?

sloopjohnc
Posts: 63921
Joined: 03 Jun 2004, 20:12

Re: California v Texas

Postby sloopjohnc » 31 May 2014, 22:49

toomanyhatz wrote:
Baron of the Flies wrote:I've dabbled, to use a loose term loosely, in California history, and it's absolutely fascinating. I know Mike Davis's books are controversial (or not universally lauded), but City of Quartz and Ecology of Fear (both about southern CA and LA) shaped the way I see things in a lot of ways. I would recommend them. I've started California: The Great Exception more times than I could count, but I'm gonna get back into it soon.


I second that emotion re: Davis. I loved 'Ecology of Fear' in particular. Californians have a grand tradition of life "in the face of adversity," said adversity basically being nature acting in a completely expected way.

Los Angeles, the city I've recently fled, is only an ideal place for a city as far as its proximity to what is possibly the largest variety of climate of any major city in the world. The fact that it's built on a fault line that's constantly moving beneath them, and is expected to hit hugely populated areas any day now, bothers the residents only after they're forced to deal with it.


We got two fault lines up north, San Andreas and Hayward. Nyah.

I've lived within two miles of either one almost my whole life.
Don't fake the funk on a nasty dunk!