Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

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Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Nolamike » 15 Jan 2012, 17:35

Well, lessee here....

Like many others, if dropped off on a desert island, and left to pick eight songs for eternity, I'd select songs that had the ability to trigger vivid memories of particular people and times in my life, rather than just eight great songs. And as I've started putting this together, it's really put into perspective what a massive impact others have had on my listening preferences. Not in a peer-pressure, I-feel-compelled-to-listen-to-these-things way, but simply by having the chance to become friends with people who have great (and varied) taste.

My earliest musical memories are of my parents singing. My mom isn't much of a singer (my dad always suggests that she, her brother, and I should form a group called "The No Tones"). I suppose maybe it was her own limitations that led her to one of her absolute favorite groups, the Everly Brothers - which she sang to me every night as a young 'un. Her fandom is why the Everlys were my first concert, at the 1984 Worlds Fair in New Orleans. She was also the Beatles fan in the house while I was growing up, and her brother was the reason we had a copy of Sgt. Pepper's, which I would put on every Sunday after church while reading the newspaper (well, the comics, sports, and Parade Magazine). She actually preferred Billy Fury. :shock: That's all down to the fact that Fury actually came and played a show in her hometown of Barrow-in-Furness (hiya, Sensi!), which wasn't too common back then (or now, for that matter, I'd imagine).

My dad, on the other hand... he's always had a great voice. He's a bit older than my mom, which is reflected in his taste - Bobby Darin is his all-time-fave, although growing up, we always had Sinatra, Mel Torme, Tony Bennett, and the like around the house. He's also a Shirley Bassey fan, and before I came along, my parents had a bar in their basement, and I've heard stories that he would do Shirley Bassey impersonations during some particularly wild parties they had. Sorry I missed 'em!

My first own conscious music choices were more in line with what was big in the early '80s. Being 6 years old in '82, Thriller was a logical first album (well, cassette) for me to buy. We never had a ton of money growing up, and my parents, despite being music fans of a sort, never really collected much. It was rare when any music was purchased and brought into the house; instead, it was largely about what we could hear on the radio.

Nevertheless, my collecting bug started around then; I had a very minimal allowance (Thriller took me about two months' worth to get), but I would use blank tapes to record songs I liked on the radio. My dad was working away from home by late '83, and I would record and mail him the cassettes of random radio songs I liked. I don't know if my dad really listened to them much, but he still has a soft spot for "Hungry Like the Wolf" and the Pointer Sisters' "Jump," so I guess they got some play.

My dad eventually landed in Texas, which meant lots of road trips for us - from Louisiana (where we had been living) to Texas to visit my dad, and after our move, from Texas back to Louisiana, to visit our friends. We didn't have tape players in the cars, just the radio, so a LOT of time was spent listening to oldies stations with my folks, and, on occasion, the contemporary popular stuff. My love of pop radio on those trips when I was about eight or so should explain my first personal concert choice - I asked my parents for my tenth birthday gift, in '86, to be tickets to see Kool and the Gang at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo (back when "Joanna," "Celebration," "Cherish," and the like were recent memories). They delivered, to the best of my memory, but that choice probably reveals, more than anything, the lack of exposure to a lot of stuff - by '86, Kool was a few years past their true popularity.

At any rate, here's my first track - a song that will always make me think of my parents, and a song that I never tire of. My dad's favorite tune:



The fact that it contains a warning about sharks could be useful on a desert island, I suppose. I actually prefer Louis Armstrong's take, but my dad's sung it so many times around me, in the Darin style, that I can hear his voice in my head whenever I hear this track. So, yeah, this one would be a good pick for me. If only I had more than eight picks, I'd also add my mom's favorite - the song she sang to me every night, and our dance at my wedding - the Everlys' "All I Have to Do Is Dream" - but space is limited. Sorry, Ma!

I continued the habit of taping songs off the radio until I was about eleven or so, though at some point I started adding my own commentary (and commercials) on the tapes after the songs. :oops: By about '87 or so, I started getting really into hip-hop, things like Licensed to Ill, Tougher Than Leather, Straight Outta Compton, Born to Mack, It Takes a Nation of Millions, and stuff that would pop up on the radio or MTV (though we didn't get cable until '91 or so). I lived in a small town, and went to a school with only a dozen other kids in my class, so my only exposure to new music, apart from the radio, was the stuff my classmates had. One of my friends, Jerome, was from "across the tracks," so to speak, and had a lot more access to that stuff than I did, which is where I got my recommendations (and where I heard more local stuff, like the Geto Boys, and the super-obscure female rapper Choice - did I mention I was a vastly undersexed early teen?). Last I heard, Jerome's leading some type of a Rastafarian school (good luck with that in East Texas!); I haven't actually seen him in 20 years. But he did have a big impact on my listening for some time, and I think that influence popped up again in a roundabout way in later years - through my interest in rhythm-heavy stuff. Unfortunately (or fortunately, as the case may be), all of that stuff was on cassette, and is long gone. I've replaced some of it on CD, and I'm sure a lot of it would likely be disappointing to hear now, but I'd still like to have the chance to dig into that old collection at some point.

I guess due to the listening tastes of kids in my high school (I commuted to the big ol' city of Houston for that), I eventually fell into the classic rock phase that every American teenaged boy seems to have at some point. Zeppelin was the biggie for me there (also the start of my boxed set obsession)... and while I still enjoy Zeppelin when I hear 'em, I dunno, I guess I burned out on 'em by overplaying them, so they wouldn't make the cut. Ditto '70s Aerosmith (which I also loved, but which I didn't get quite so burned out on). Grunge hit around this time as well, and I had the obligatory copies of Nevermind and Ten, and the Black Crowes, to keep some of those retro sounds, like everyone else in my school at the time. There was also a brief interest in Stevie Ray Vaughan (let me emphasize BRIEF - and remind you that I was in my early teens in Texas).

Fortunately, I had the opportunity to meet my great friend Steve at the start of my third year of high school, and we became pretty inseparable around that point. He's the guy that started introducing me to a lot more non-commercial stuff, and while we've gone very different directions in terms of what we currently listen to, Steve probably had the biggest influence on sending me down the path to record collector-dom.

As I mentioned earlier, I lived in a small town, about forty miles from Houston. The only access I had to music in that town was what I could hear on the radio, the few things my friends might have found that weren't on the radio, and maybe some idea of stuff based on what I could read in outdated issues of Rolling Stone at the public library. I definitely had an interest in finding new stuff - I was always into shifting my musical focus, as you can probably see from all the stuff above - but I just never really knew where to look. When I first met Steve, it coincided with getting my driver's license, and with that, the freedom to go to places (like record stores) that I'd never really imagined existed before. Yeah, I'd been to "record stores," but my experience was limited to whatever was in the shopping malls my mom brought me to. Not exactly the coolest places - overpriced, very limited selection... they were interesting enough, until I found the real deal. Steve introduced me to my first "real" record store, Sound Exchange, the Houston outpost of an Austin institution. It's still around, though in a different location, and as a shell of its former self. He and I would go there at least once every week. As I mentioned, I commuted into town (about a forty-five minute drive) for school; on Fridays, my folks would toss me a few bucks, so I could hang out with my friends and grab some dinner with them. Of course, all the money went to records/tapes, and I'd either starve, or take a bit of change to buy a candy bar or a cheap taco or something. And the records... I'd dig for stuff I'd heard about, or which Steve had heard about, and which I thought I would like. And, well, stuff which I thought the gal at the counter would like. Her name (well, what she went by) was Bliss Blood, and she sang for a killer local band, The Pain Teens. I was a scrawny kid ten years her junior, so I don't know why I was trying to impress her, but I guess that's the teenaged boy way. :oops: I saw her play a show years later, and she did end up flirting with me (rather than vice versa) before she took the stage, but by then, well, the "magic" had gone. But my love of that band led me to their label, Trance Syndicate, run by the Butthole Surfers' guitarist (Paul Leary), and all of the other bands on there (Bedhead and Roky Erickson being the only ones I still listen to regularly these days, though I'm sure others still have their merit).

So, at any rate, here we are, a million words in, and I'm just getting to my second song. THIS is the anthem of my high school years, a song I heard a bajillion times back then, on all of those days driving around Houston and going to record stores. There was always a copy of the album in our cars, and, being in Houston, we were in our cars a lot:



I still love it when I hear it. I rarely listen to rock anymore, and make no pretenses of staying current with whatever's hip with the younger sets, but, well, this reminds me of when I did, and makes me happy for it.

Going from there, things snowballed pretty rapidly. The residual classic rock phase (well, Zeppelin, in particular) led me to older blues stuff, both the early things (like Bukka White, Robert Johnson, Charley Patton, and the like), and the '50s stuff like Howlin' Wolf. Those things inspired me on my very limited shoplifting phase - I yanked a handful of clearance rack cassettes of this stuff from the mall record store chains. :oops: I'm still mortified that I did this, but, well, at least it was from chain stores, and the artists were long gone. Eventually, I ended up living in the Mississippi Delta for a few years, so that stuff ended up making more sense down the line, in a way. At this point, I'll go ahead and toss in a Wolf tune with a chunk of lyrics lifted from Patton, to get a double dose of sorts:



After high school, I went off to Tulane (heya, Muskrat!), where I was immediately more interested in the radio station, WTUL, than I was in my classes (hey there again, Todd!). As they were undermanned, and I at least had some general knowledge of some slightly non-mainstream stuff (and a huge curiousity), I was rushed through the apprenticeship program there, and within a few weeks of starting school, had my own show... from 2 to 6 a.m., the night before an 8:00 a.m. class. My grades that semester... yeesh. But my interest in music? Oh yeah... I was given four hours every week, with a collection of about 25,000 albums, and the only directives being: 1. Play nothing you'll hear on other radio stations; 2. Play four merits (new releases) per hour; 3. play one "alternative oldie" every show; and 4. Play at least three songs from two "non-rock" genres every show. I can't even begin to describe what a huge impact this had for me - I got a chance to hear basically anything I'd heard about, and as everything was organized numerically (catalogued as the station had obtained it), I found all sorts of things that just looked interesting as I dug for the specific things I was searching for. The genre requirements gave me even more incentive to branch out, and within a couple years, each week I had a two hour free form show, a two hour jazz show, and a two hour classical show, and was the musical director (the guy who reviewed records, and decided what should be added to the station's collection) for all specialty programming (essentially, everything but rock and hip hop).

Not only did I find a ton of great music through the radio station, but I found a ton of great people. I met some guys who I ended up in bands with (I was never much of a musician, but had fun doing it), met some other friends I'm still in touch with today, and, most importantly, met the love of my life. That's a story for another day (and another couple thousand words), but at any rate, she transferred to a school in Chicago before we become all romantical with one another. But our early flirtations were often around music (I'm looking at you, The Misfits!), and my band (featuring some really good friends of hers) gave her a reason to return to New Orleans for a Halloween show in which the band dressed up as Blondie (and did well enough to inspire my first kiss with the gal). It'd be tough to pick a single song for my wife and I - we've had a bunch, e.g., Big Star's "Thirteen," Ivory Joe Hunter's "Since I Met You Baby" (the first dance at our wedding), etc., etc., but one that was there from the start, and which still gets us smiling at one another, is this gem from, for my money, the country singer with the best voice you'll ever hear:



We eventually honeymooned in our (and Lefty's) home state of Texas. And being I a desert island, I'm sure it would ring true - I'd certainly have a lot of time, and probably very little money.

After my graduation, I spent a two-year stint teaching at an underprivileged middle school in the Mississippi Delta. My future wife was still in Chicago, and whenever I had a long weekend, I'd make the ten or so hour drive to visit her after my day of teaching. The expectation of seeing my gal, and having a vehicle whose only music source was an FM/AM radio, led me to develop a soft spot for a lot of late '90s pop (Southern and Central Illinois isn't exactly a radio hotbed). Fortunately, I eventually replaced the radio in the car, and through the magic of CDs, I was able to keep myself awake on those drives with things like Tom Waits' Nighthawks and Springsteen's Nebraska. Which is fortunate, as otherwise, I'd be forced to have my next song be something like ,this,this, or this. (I guess late '90s pop was all about kissing).

On the plus side of teaching in the middle of nowhere, I also had my first real disposable income, and a rent that was ridiculously cheap for a beautiful place (people aren't exactly beating down the doors to move to the delta), so I got into the habit (I won't call it bad) of taking my paychecks, driving the hour to Memphis, and heading straight to the record store. Oh, if only I could still buy a couple hundred bucks worth of albums per month... :) My roommate in the Delta was the final MAJOR influence on my listening, the guy who is my best friend, the best man at our wedding, and the godfather of our daughter - Darcy. He and I influenced each other's listening a ton - early on, it was mostly indie type stuff, but we continued to branch out. I eventually brought him to the soul/funk stuff, and from there, he brought us to a load of world stuff, e.g., Mulatu Astatque, Fela, etc. - and increased my own curiosity for things outside of the English speaking world (which brought us to Brazilian stuff). If forced to live with any friend's record collection, I'd gladly pick his, without hesitation - and I wouldn't be surprised if he picked mine. We lived together (or within a couple blocks of each other) for five years, and we still make it a point to get together at least once or twice a year. He's the primary reason why our "New Orleans has sunk into the sea" plan, if ever necessary, will result in our relocation to Louisville, and is basically the cool brother I never had.

I'll nominate my next song here - a song that helped get me started to get into jazz at the radio station (though I'll always feel like a neophyte), which was re-introduced to me in a major way through Darcy, and from an album that would regularly keep me awake on those long drives to visit my gal:



Darcy and I both eventually moved to Chicago, putting an end to those drives. My first year there, my wife's parents bought me an Amazon gift card for my birthday. They meant to get me one $50 code, but messed up, and accidentally sent my two. They didn't want to bother with a return, so told me to just enjoy both. Musically curious, $100 to spare... I made a complete impulse buy, and got the first of the Stax singles sets. I had heard some of the hits (not much beyond the obvious Otis Redding hits and a few other inescapable oldies), and had heard that the set was great, but I didn't really know what I was getting into. And boy, was it a revelation, which led me down the soul and funk rabbit hole for a long time to come. From there, I branched out pretty rapidly (thanks to disposable income, again), and started buying every soul and funk release that was supposed to be any good. Somewhere in there, I found the Impressions, with what may be my favorite song ever made - a pure blast of joy and positivity, which I think would get me in the right frame of mind for an eternity on an island:



And now we're running perilously short on tracks. And I haven't even picked a New Orleans tune yet.

As you probably know, I ended up back in New Orleans (by choice, and with the wife in tow) after a few years in Chicago. By this point, I started to get caught up on all of the New Orleans music I should have really discovered in my earlier stint in town, and started getting into brass bands in addition to the classic New Orleans soul and funk. This town really became home.

And then, Katrina. We had to spend months away from our town, not knowing whether our friends had gotten out for a couple weeks, and having no clue whether our house was intact for about five weeks. We had a lot of friends who lost their homes and all possessions, and a few friends who lost a loved one. Even after tracking down pretty much everyone, and eventually being allowed back in to see our house (we had *only* $40,000 or so of damage - we were relatively unscathed), we were filled with anxiety over whether our town would survive, let alone recover. This (for obvious reasons) was another significant experience in my life, and there should be a song to reflect it. While it became a major cliche, this song sums up that experience for me (and helps reflect my major interest in oder music, in particular, jazz):



And now I have one more... a tune to make me think of my daughter. Fortunately, this one will also keep me thinking of my wife. My daughter is already opinionated about music (she just turned five last month), and she has some definitive favorites (while she loves Fats Domino and a modern Cajun group, Feufollet, her Beatles and Elvis phases have already passed). Nevertheless, the song that really HITS me when I think about her is one that hasn't really grabbed her (yet). It pretty much brings me to tears when I think about the girl, but then again, I'm the sappy, sentimental type:



And yeah, I dare any parent to listen to that without getting all teary eyed. And if you disagree, well, um, go to hell or something.

The track has the added advantage of reminding me of the wife - we got our copy of the set signed by Stephen Merritt when it was released, and saw him perform all 69 of the songs live. :)

So, there are my tracks. I guess now I've got to pick a luxury item. I'd love to pick someone to hang out with me (my wife, my daughter, or Steve or Darcy), but that wouldn't be fair to them, and it seems as if that would be cheating. Ditto on an internet connection or phone or TV, or a personal chef, or anything requiring electricity. And this gets me down to one of two things... either a great (and massive) book to keep me occupied, or a crate of some really nice booze, to keep me satisfied. Tough choice! Part of me would like each - it would be great to have something to read (and re-read) to give me that modicum of human interaction, but at the same time, it would be nice to just get a bit tipsy on a regular basis, to help me forget that I'm stuck alone on a desert island. I'd love to got the high road, but I'm guessing the book would get a bit old after repeated readings, so, um, howsabout a big ol' shipping container of, say, a 40 year old Laphroaig? :)
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby sloopjohnc » 15 Jan 2012, 18:26

Okay, I've read this twice and nowhere do I see how my musical tastes influenced you.

Second, I don't see where you left room for any song off the new Van Halen record.

Even with those obvious omissions, it's still pretty good.

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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby LeBaron » 15 Jan 2012, 22:07

Nice work, Mike! It never ceases to amaze me how similar our experiences have been. From the small town (listening to the radio) with no real record stores to going to school and getting sucked in at the radio station. And then there's Trance Syndicate (headed up by King Coffey, btw). And even though I already knew all of this, I still learned plenty. I'll be dropping by for a sip of the whisky.
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby T. Willy Rye » 15 Jan 2012, 23:30

A really great read, Mike!

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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby fange » 16 Jan 2012, 00:14

A great read, Nolamike! The joy you've gotten from music, and how it has been such a crucial part of your life story, is totally infectious man. Cheers!

One note - do SRV and The Fabulous Thunderbirds carry some kind of baggage for kids growing up in Texas? I love those guys!
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Count Machuki » 16 Jan 2012, 01:03

It's a great read and all, but I'd rather hear it told over a few fancy Southern gentleman drinks with muddled something in them.

Sound like a deal, Nolamike?
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby LeBaron » 16 Jan 2012, 01:32

Fangedango! wrote:One note - do SRV and The Fabulous Thunderbirds carry some kind of baggage for kids growing up in Texas? I love those guys!


Kind of. SRV was/is omnipresent on the radio and has a certain uncritical, meathead-ish following.
It's a shame, really. The fact that he was a bit flashy and has become classic rock radio fodder obscures the fact that he was one of a few credible white blues artists.
The early Thunderbirds were great, but that was 30 years ago.
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby fange » 16 Jan 2012, 07:11

Ah ok, cheers Baron. Makes sense - a common phenomenon too; just change the figure from country to country, or even region to region.
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Moleskin » 16 Jan 2012, 11:40

Really great reading, and some nice music too. :) Thanks!
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Six String » 16 Jan 2012, 20:11

Baron wrote:
Fangedango! wrote:One note - do SRV and The Fabulous Thunderbirds carry some kind of baggage for kids growing up in Texas? I love those guys!


Kind of. SRV was/is omnipresent on the radio and has a certain uncritical, meathead-ish following.
It's a shame, really. The fact that he was a bit flashy and has become classic rock radio fodder obscures the fact that he was one of a few credible white blues artists.
The early Thunderbirds were great, but that was 30 years ago.


I remember when SRV was still pretty new and I was so much more of a Jimmy Vaughn fan and found some of Stevie's showmanship a little OTT and unnecessary but if you closed your eyes you could hear that he was playing some pretty great blues. I suppose it was what Stevie wanted though I wonder what he thought after he had it for a while. Sadly he never lived long enough to sort that out.

That was a great read Mike. It brought back memories of my life too. You see I always seemed to be living in uncool radio towns when I was a young boy too so I get how hard it was to hear new music that mattered. Also I used to go to the Sound Exchange in Houston from late '82 to late '85 before I moved to California. Along with Texas Records and one or two other places I used to spend my Saturdays combing through the vinyl selections at those stores. I have an uncle who was a teacher most of his life and his first gig after graduating was teaching in a one room school house on the bayou so I met people he knew
when he lived there and he still keeps connections with some of them (who are stil alive) though he lives in Texas now. So reading about your teaching job in the delta made me think of my uncle and his experiences. Why am I babbling on about this? :? Just to say I get some of those places and things you've been to or done I guess. I really did enjoy reading your post. I'll stop now. :oops:

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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Magilla » 16 Jan 2012, 20:30

Baron wrote:
Fangedango! wrote:One note - do SRV and The Fabulous Thunderbirds carry some kind of baggage for kids growing up in Texas? I love those guys!


Kind of. SRV was/is omnipresent on the radio and has a certain uncritical, meathead-ish following.
It's a shame, really. The fact that he was a bit flashy and has become classic rock radio fodder obscures the fact that he was one of a few credible white blues artists.
The early Thunderbirds were great, but that was 30 years ago.


A friend of mine supported SRV when he toured NZ in the mid '80s, said he was a lovely bloke.
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Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Wally Bingbang » 16 Jan 2012, 20:51

Nice one, Mike. And yeah, there's no shame in SRV fandom.
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby John aka Josh » 16 Jan 2012, 21:10

Very much enjoyed reading that, thanks. Good choices too!
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Corporate whore » 17 Jan 2012, 13:15

Great read, and some great music there too.

You do know you get a book as well as a luxury don't you?
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby kalowski II: The Revenge » 17 Jan 2012, 13:29

Superb stuff, my joint fave so far with LoL's.

I've often struggled to understand how certain posters make the jump from indie/alt to early soul/jazz/r'n'b etc , two aesthetics that seem a million miles apart to me. Sometimes I feel that they're paying penance for digging the dabblers, the poseurs and the desperate-to-impress of the indie scene so they swing to the other extreme - the heartfelt, the grubby, the honest. Nolamike shows me how that can happen via geography and circumstance. He's a good man.
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Nolamike » 17 Jan 2012, 14:52

Thanks for the kind words, y'all!

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Ah! In that case... I'd probably take Shelby Foote's Civil War trilogy, if multivolume sets are allowable.
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Polishgirl » 17 Jan 2012, 16:59

Interesting and enjoyable - loved the variety of music chosen as well. Thank you. :D

I was intrigued by the mention of you adding your own commercials in to your music recordings....can you remember any examples?
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby Belle Lettre » 17 Jan 2012, 18:16

Harvey K-Tel wrote:Nice one, Mike. And yeah, there's no shame in SRV fandom.


Damn right!

Grest job Mike.
Nikki Gradual wrote:
Get a fucking grip you narcissistic cretins.

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kath
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby kath » 17 Jan 2012, 22:10

Baron wrote:Kind of. SRV was/is omnipresent on the radio and has a certain uncritical, meathead-ish following.
It's a shame, really. The fact that he was a bit flashy and has become classic rock radio fodder obscures the fact that he was one of a few credible white blues artists.


baron, i don't think it's a shame. i think it's a crime.

(um, sorry, mike. i'm talkin to the baron right now. do ya mind?)

i am a fan of many white boy blues guitters.. rory, johnny, roy, the rev, et alia. but i tell ya, i always thought there was something extra special goin on with SRV. at first, i couldn't pin down exactly what it was. one day i realized that the way he played (and sang), the way he was able, at his best, to channel such emotional intensity and let it rip with that guit as a conduit, as another limb or some damn thing... well, it reminded me the most of what i loved the most in hendrix.

yeah, i said it. everybody fucque off (says the woman who put SRV on her cup list last year, as she resignedly straps on her armor...)

um. so what were we doing? ohhhhh. miiiiiiike.

i probably don't need to tell ya why i find yer entry particularly groovy. i may not know much about certain artists, but i *do* know how the music of a place can seep right up into yer boots and never come off.

no, i had never heard that mag fields track, and yes, it's wonderful.

by the way, that one line of yers? "And if you disagree, well, um, go to hell or something" ...? i loved it so much, i shared it with reap. we've been riffin on it allll day longggg. of course, none of our versions come anywhere near the masterpiece in rootsian, direct tone/meaning play of the original. sniff.

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kath
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Re: Desert Island Discs - Nolamike

Postby kath » 17 Jan 2012, 22:22

p.s. the shelby choice is particularly inspired as well.