September 2010 Reviews

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Nolamike
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September 2010 Reviews

Postby Nolamike » 16 Sep 2010, 04:42

OK, this is my first mix club review (and I already wrote tracks 1-11, but my stupid browser closed, erasing everything :x ). I've had the disc for three days, and have given it 6 (!) listens, so here goes.

Track One
A nice '70s disco/funk workout, about how the singer's baby should call him, since he is, after all, the "big man." :) Nice synth, strings, wah-wah guitar, harmony vocals, bass... and what really makes it for me - these massive low-end blasts of brass/reeds that just totally goes right through your chest when you listen. It sounds like some of those big Curtis Mayfield productions. Oh, and a cool electric-piano breakdown - hell yeah! I should have known this tune before this disc, but hey, at least now I do. Thanks!

Track Two
A '70s soulful blues track about not being the most mentally put-together guy on the block. :) I like it quite a bit, but what really does it for me is the tightness of the bass/drums. That rhythm section cooks! And it goes into another stratosphere when the drummer switches to these little syncopated riffs on the ride cymbal towards the end. Nice!

Track Three
One of only one-and-a-half duds on the album (a really good success rate!). It is a rock tune, from somewhere between, say, 1993 and the present. The intro is cool, but then it hits the chorus and a way-too-earnest singer that just leaves me cold - and musically, the chorus isn't any better for me. :( In fact, it kinda ruins the rest of the verses. A well-crafted tune, but it just doesn't do it for me at all. Sorry!

Track Four
This one is the half-dud for me. The song itself is incredible - a wonderful gospel tune that seems like it should have been covered about eight billion times, but I don't think I've ever heard any version of it before. And the singer isn't the problem, either - he's a bit like modern-day Willie Nelson - the voice has a ton of character and conveys a lot of emotion, even though it sounds like time has stripped away a lot of physical presence that had once been there. The problem? The production. The drums are just flat and tightly tuned and trebly, with an emphasis on the hi-hat; the bass and guitar are far too clean and sterile sounding, and the guitar solo just leaves me cold. The organ can stay as-is, though. And it sucks writing this, because there is a great song buried in here. These last two made me nervous about what was to follow, but as you'll see in about five words, I didn't need to be.

Track Five
:o HELL YES! A recent-sounding country/bluegrass tune, with (1) great lyrics about fleeing the Georgia farm he grew up on, and staying out on the road, (2) fantastic vocals, with really nice harmonies, (3) a good melody and some really impressive bridges and changes throughout the song - it is really complex, but sounds so natural, and (4) really great musicianship, including some really great solos. I can't express my love for this thing enough, and I'm really jonesing to know who did it so I can track out some more stuff by this guy. Great selection!

Track Six
This one is right in my sweet-spot - a down and dirty guitar/tambourine duo doing a laconic but biting boogie, backing a guy that sounds like a half-drunk older man singing through a harmonica mic. And singing about how ugly his gal is. And then bringing the song to a stop so he can talk in the voice of his ugly woman. YES! I love, love, LOVE this kind of stuff, and never get tired of it. Nice choice!

Track Seven
A nice modern-sounding rock tune. The vocals are a good balance between cool slacker detachment and genuine emotion, hanging out on the higher end of the singer's range. Musically, it sounds a bit like the Clean, with that organ and cleanly picked bassy guitar, and the drummer doing those triple hits on the snare. But then there's the horn, which adds a really great touch to the song. And it comes to an end long before it can overstay its welcome. This is a great pick - thanks!

Track Eight
Ok, this has to be recent Dylan, right? It could also be a ludicrously drunk Springsteen, who's had so much Old Granddad bourbon that he's forgotten how to control his tongue and jaw, but I'm going with Dylan. :) It's got a great tremelo-ed guitar, kinda like Pops Staples with a twang, and a junk-trap street-corner rhythm backing. And the lyrics are a great, straightforward cross between Woody Guthrie (banks are failing, religion is a bit of a crock) and the blues (my gal's done gone). Kinda like track six, in that it hits this great little spot for me. Man, I need to get some latter-day Dylan stuff. I know it's heresy, but I really prefer this kind of thing to his '60s and '70s heyday. :oops:

Track Nine
An obviously recent but classic-sounding honky tonk song. Reminds me of Wanda Jackson's "Kickin' Each Others' Hearts Around," but sung in a delivery somewhere between Ernest Tubb and Gram Parsons. The singer ain't technically perfect, but he's perfect for the song. Gimme a bottle of bourbon, a couple discs of this, and a night alone and I'm weirdly in paradise. Good pick!

Track Ten
This sounds like it is from the '60s, and coolly walks the line between rock and soul. "All Strung Out." Some really driving percussion, heavy organ, and a bass player that is having a lot of fun. I can't tell if the singer is a white guy who does a great job of sounding black, or if it is a black guy singing in a rock style. There's some good call-and-response from the band. What makes it, though, are the little stops, where the bass and snare pick it up again. I dig it.

Track Eleven
Sounds like a modern band trying to do Smokey Robinson, but it works really well. There's some falsetto male vocals with harmony, a stripped-down soulful arrangement with a clean riffy guitar and tambourine, and some nice orchestration that comes in at the choruses. Nice!

Track Twelve
A fifties tune in the jump blues vein. Some gruff (for the time) vocals, some pounding piano and handclaps, and a great arrangement, with a really good sax solo. And really amusing lyrics about maybe going on a trip, but nah, I'll stay right here. Good one.

Track Thirteen
A good tune lying somewhere between country, bluegrass, and folk. I love the high lonesome sound ( :) ) in the vocals, just a really well-put together song.

Track Fourteen
A more upbeat song straddling those same lines as track thirteen. I've been getting the chorus of this one stuck in my head the last few days. Another good pick.

Track Fifteen
A fifties rockabilly tune, and like some of the early tracks on the disc, I really feel like I should know this one. Classic backing - the double bass, drums, and electric guitar, with a bit the Sun production sound in there. You're on a good run with these selections!

Track Sixteen
If I recall, this is Jim Carroll, isn't it? I think I played this one (despite some slightly naughty content) on my college radio show. :) It sounds good. I gotta check this stuff out again. Thanks!

Track Seventeen
OK, I don't know the song, but I'll bet my next paycheck that it's David Ruffin (I'm guessing solo, rather than with the Tempts). And... what the hell? :shock: Paraphrasing here: "Naw man, this isn't a mannequin, it's my girlfriend!" It should've been the theme song for Lars and the Real Girl, or (more obviously) Mannequin. But hey, it's David Ruffin with the classic Motown sound. Of course it is fantastic!

Thanks, mystery sender! I'll be enjoying this one quite a bit, and I'm really looking forward to getting the track list. Sorry I petered out a bit on the reviews towards the end. I'll try to beef 'em up tomorrow.

Mix Club is awesome, y'all!
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby The Fish » 16 Sep 2010, 20:48

Nolamike wrote:OK, this is my first mix club review (and I already wrote tracks 1-11, but my stupid browser closed, erasing everything :x ). I've had the disc for three days, and have given it 6 (!) listens, so here goes.

Well this was my doing. I figured I had fairly similar tastes so thought (hoped !) I could put something together to well and truly get you on board the mix club bus. And hey it looks like I succeeded

Track One
A nice '70s disco/funk workout, about how the singer's baby should call him, since he is, after all, the "big man." :) Nice synth, strings, wah-wah guitar, harmony vocals, bass... and what really makes it for me - these massive low-end blasts of brass/reeds that just totally goes right through your chest when you listen. It sounds like some of those big Curtis Mayfield productions. Oh, and a cool electric-piano breakdown - hell yeah! I should have known this tune before this disc, but hey, at least now I do. Thanks!

First up it's Eddie Kendricks. This is from the Hip-O-Select releases covering the solo stuff. Played this recently for the first time in a long while and really dug it. Of course if you look at your (correct) guess for the closing track, I can smugly say "See what I did there" :D

Track Two
A '70s soulful blues track about not being the most mentally put-together guy on the block. :) I like it quite a bit, but what really does it for me is the tightness of the bass/drums. That rhythm section cooks! And it goes into another stratosphere when the drummer switches to these little syncopated riffs on the ride cymbal towards the end. Nice!

Just about everyone gets this from me at some point as I think this an absolute monster track. You DO know who this is and you'll probably kick yourself when I reveal that it's Boz Scaggs. Personally I love all that Silk Degrees era stuff as well , but this is from the self titled debut. And if Boz in fine voice with a great song wasn't enough, let's record it at Muscle Shoals with the full studio band and then let's get Duane Allman in to play guitar

Track Three
One of only one-and-a-half duds on the album (a really good success rate!). It is a rock tune, from somewhere between, say, 1993 and the present. The intro is cool, but then it hits the chorus and a way-too-earnest singer that just leaves me cold - and musically, the chorus isn't any better for me. :( In fact, it kinda ruins the rest of the verses. A well-crafted tune, but it just doesn't do it for me at all. Sorry!

No worries. This is Chris Whitley, but not exactly typical Chris Whitley

Track Four
This one is the half-dud for me. The song itself is incredible - a wonderful gospel tune that seems like it should have been covered about eight billion times, but I don't think I've ever heard any version of it before. And the singer isn't the problem, either - he's a bit like modern-day Willie Nelson - the voice has a ton of character and conveys a lot of emotion, even though it sounds like time has stripped away a lot of physical presence that had once been there. The problem? The production. The drums are just flat and tightly tuned and trebly, with an emphasis on the hi-hat; the bass and guitar are far too clean and sterile sounding, and the guitar solo just leaves me cold. The organ can stay as-is, though. And it sucks writing this, because there is a great song buried in here. These last two made me nervous about what was to follow, but as you'll see in about five words, I didn't need to be.

Well the famous quote from Richard Thompson goes "There's only three great white blues singers and two of them are Geoff Muldaur" Not sure I quite see pure greatness in the voice, but he does a good job as a "keeper of the flame" for want of a better phrase. Certainly tasteful and with his heart in the right place, which I suppose echoes what you've said to an extent.

Track Five
:o HELL YES! A recent-sounding country/bluegrass tune, with (1) great lyrics about fleeing the Georgia farm he grew up on, and staying out on the road, (2) fantastic vocals, with really nice harmonies, (3) a good melody and some really impressive bridges and changes throughout the song - it is really complex, but sounds so natural, and (4) really great musicianship, including some really great solos. I can't express my love for this thing enough, and I'm really jonesing to know who did it so I can track out some more stuff by this guy. Great selection!

Well the name you've been waiting for is Robbie Fulks. An underrated talent I agree.

Track Six
This one is right in my sweet-spot - a down and dirty guitar/tambourine duo doing a laconic but biting boogie, backing a guy that sounds like a half-drunk older man singing through a harmonica mic. And singing about how ugly his gal is. And then bringing the song to a stop so he can talk in the voice of his ugly woman. YES! I love, love, LOVE this kind of stuff, and never get tired of it. Nice choice!

This is the wonderful if slightly bonkers Hasil Adkins. He does a range of stuff covering blues, rockabilly, country usually in some bizarre mish mash. This is on Fat Possum, so he's gone for the trademark sound of plug in, crank up and let loose.

Track Seven
A nice modern-sounding rock tune. The vocals are a good balance between cool slacker detachment and genuine emotion, hanging out on the higher end of the singer's range. Musically, it sounds a bit like the Clean, with that organ and cleanly picked bassy guitar, and the drummer doing those triple hits on the snare. But then there's the horn, which adds a really great touch to the song. And it comes to an end long before it can overstay its welcome. This is a great pick - thanks!

Well I voted this album my favourite in last year's BCB end of year poll. The band is Fanfarlo

Track Eight
Ok, this has to be recent Dylan, right? It could also be a ludicrously drunk Springsteen, who's had so much Old Granddad bourbon that he's forgotten how to control his tongue and jaw, but I'm going with Dylan. :) It's got a great tremelo-ed guitar, kinda like Pops Staples with a twang, and a junk-trap street-corner rhythm backing. And the lyrics are a great, straightforward cross between Woody Guthrie (banks are failing, religion is a bit of a crock) and the blues (my gal's done gone). Kinda like track six, in that it hits this great little spot for me. Man, I need to get some latter-day Dylan stuff. I know it's heresy, but I really prefer this kind of thing to his '60s and '70s heyday. :oops:

Not Dylan, but I'm sure Chris Smither will be pleased by the comparison. From his most recent album and a return to form.

Track Nine
An obviously recent but classic-sounding honky tonk song. Reminds me of Wanda Jackson's "Kickin' Each Others' Hearts Around," but sung in a delivery somewhere between Ernest Tubb and Gram Parsons. The singer ain't technically perfect, but he's perfect for the song. Gimme a bottle of bourbon, a couple discs of this, and a night alone and I'm weirdly in paradise. Good pick!

Gurf Morlix, maybe better known for his work with Lucinda Williams.

Track Ten
This sounds like it is from the '60s, and coolly walks the line between rock and soul. "All Strung Out." Some really driving percussion, heavy organ, and a bass player that is having a lot of fun. I can't tell if the singer is a white guy who does a great job of sounding black, or if it is a black guy singing in a rock style. There's some good call-and-response from the band. What makes it, though, are the little stops, where the bass and snare pick it up again. I dig it.

The latter. The Chambers Brothers

Track Eleven
Sounds like a modern band trying to do Smokey Robinson, but it works really well. There's some falsetto male vocals with harmony, a stripped-down soulful arrangement with a clean riffy guitar and tambourine, and some nice orchestration that comes in at the choruses. Nice!

It is imdeed recent. It's Raphael Saadiq. One of the few modern soul acts who manage to sound retro without being slavishly so

Track Twelve
A fifties tune in the jump blues vein. Some gruff (for the time) vocals, some pounding piano and handclaps, and a great arrangement, with a really good sax solo. And really amusing lyrics about maybe going on a trip, but nah, I'll stay right here. Good one.

I'm a sucker for all that jump jive/blues shouter stuff. Tiny Bradshaw

Track Thirteen
A good tune lying somewhere between country, bluegrass, and folk. I love the high lonesome sound ( :) ) in the vocals, just a really well-put together song.

Baron can vouch for this guy. Gary Stewart. Died all too young a while back now.

Track Fourteen
A more upbeat song straddling those same lines as track thirteen. I've been getting the chorus of this one stuck in my head the last few days. Another good pick.

I always hear a kind of Dillards feel to this. That "back porch" style. Surprising maybe then that this is English. Matthews Southern Comfort. Deserves to be judged on more than his version of Woodstock (as if CSNY and Joni didn't have that covered already)

Track Fifteen
A fifties rockabilly tune, and like some of the early tracks on the disc, I really feel like I should know this one. Classic backing - the double bass, drums, and electric guitar, with a bit the Sun production sound in there. You're on a good run with these selections!

Well I first heard this on one of the comps I picked up at the first ever JUOTA (T Berry Shuffle) and I loved this then on first hearing. Sun indeed , it's Carl Perkins.

Track Sixteen
If I recall, this is Jim Carroll, isn't it? I think I played this one (despite some slightly naughty content) on my college radio show. :) It sounds good. I gotta check this stuff out again. Thanks!

When I read the review lunchtime, I'd fogotten I'd put this on and it seem to stick out a bit. This was obviously my wild card pick, although it looks like I still scored with this, and yes it is JC.

Track Seventeen
OK, I don't know the song, but I'll bet my next paycheck that it's David Ruffin (I'm guessing solo, rather than with the Tempts). And... what the hell? :shock: Paraphrasing here: "Naw man, this isn't a mannequin, it's my girlfriend!" It should've been the theme song for Lars and the Real Girl, or (more obviously) Mannequin. But hey, it's David Ruffin with the classic Motown sound. Of course it is fantastic!

Your next paycheck is safe. Go treat yourself to a po' boy. I hit upon the idea of bookending the comp this way which seemed to work. Playing this again I realised just what a singer he is. There's a kind of roughness there which is the perfect antidote to too mucj sweet soul, great though that may be.

Thanks, mystery sender! I'll be enjoying this one quite a bit, and I'm really looking forward to getting the track list. Sorry I petered out a bit on the reviews towards the end. I'll try to beef 'em up tomorrow.

Thanks Mike. I'm genuinely delighted that you enjoyed this so much

Mix Club is awesome, y'all!

Amen brother.


1. Eddie Kendricks - The Thin Man
2. Boz Scaggs - I'm Easy
3. Chris Whitley - Say Goodbye
4. Geoff Muldaur - This World Is Not My Home
5. Robbie Fulks - Where There's A road
6. Hasil Adkins - Ugly Woman
7. Fanfarlo - Fire Escape
8. Chris Smither - Surprise Surprise
9. Gurf Morlix - Without You
10. The Chambers Brothers - All Strung Out Over You
11. Raphael Saadiq - Love That Girl
12. Tiny Bradshaw - Well Oh Well
13. Gary Stewart - Williamson County
14. Matthews Southern Comfort - The Ballad Of Obray Ramsey
15. Carl Perkins - Put Your Cat Clothes On
16. Jim Carroll Band - It's Too Late
17. David Ruffin - I Know She's Not A Mannequin


We're way past rhubarb

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Nolamike
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Nolamike » 16 Sep 2010, 20:58

The Fish wrote:
Thanks Mike. I'm genuinely delighted that you enjoyed this so much


1. Eddie Kendricks - The Thin Man
2. Boz Scaggs - I'm Easy
3. Chris Whitley - Say Goodbye
4. Geoff Muldaur - This World Is Not My Home
5. Robbie Fulks - Where There's A road
6. Hasil Adkins - Ugly Woman
7. Fanfarlo - Fire Escape
8. Chris Smither - Surprise Surprise
9. Gurf Morlix - Without You
10. The Chambers Brothers - All Strung Out Over You
11. Raphael Saadiq - Love That Girl
12. Tiny Bradshaw - Well Oh Well
13. Gary Stewart - Williamson County
14. Matthews Southern Comfort - The Ballad Of Obray Ramsey
15. Carl Perkins - Put Your Cat Clothes On
16. Jim Carroll Band - It's Too Late
17. David Ruffin - I Know She's Not A Mannequin




Excellent! Thank ya sir!

What period is the Kendricks from? It really is a monster.

I should have known that was Boz Scaggs. But hey, at least I knew it was a good rhythm section!

The Robbie Fulks one is equally embarrassing - I've seen the guy live about four or five times, and have a handful of tracks kicking around on comps. :oops:

And ditto the Hasil Adkins. Well, haven't seen him live, but I do have a number of tracks from him floating around. I'm gonna have to grab a whole album at some point.

Saadiq played here for Essence Fest this past summer, and I was this close to going (it is basically a ton of soul and R&B acts, some classic, some modern, playing over a long weekend). I'll be kicking myself even more for missing it now that I've got this.

I'd heard Gary Stewart's name a ton, and had been meaning to check him out, so I'm glad you got me started.

Again, great mix, Fish! I'll be enjoying this one for a long time to come. :)
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby The Fish » 16 Sep 2010, 21:03

The original Kendricks album is Boogie Down - 1973

And trust me from personal experience that won't be the last time in Mix Club you use the phrase "I should have known that was......." :D
We're way past rhubarb

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Jumper k » 16 Sep 2010, 21:36

All the way from the Land of the Long White Cloud comes a very good mix of spiky rock and roll goodness, smooth soul with some oddities thrown in making it a winner round my way. Some is familiar some I havn't got a scooby.

Track 1. Kicking Off with the mighty Terrorways and Short Haired Rock and Roll. A prime cut of Auckland punk from 1980. First heard this on the AK79 comp that Dirk, a mate from Karitane, introduced me to when I was working in London. Still got his home taped cassette copy. Smart!

2. Starts out like R Dean Taylor and then gets into an almost Gang of Four punk funk groove. Sneering vocals about big fat Elvis. Some good riffing with a fairly basic backbeat. Interesting, I think its possibly early to mid 80's.

3. Its Jazz! Not unpleasant either. Nice bass intro which morphs into some frantic rhythm and sax playing. Slows down into cool lounge style after a minute with sweet piano motif, picking up again with bass and sax.
I've no idea who this is but they are tight and its not too dischordant but on the edge of my jazz listening comfort zone. I could listen to more along the same lines.

4. Jesus the riff is low and dirty. Basic descending chords with someone who sounds like Danzig. Don't think its Misfits. Superb outro goes off into the stratosphere. Swings like a mofo though. Nice!

5. God Is Standing By. Soulful goodness from the Reverend Al. It has a swing all of its own and of course the backing vocals are sumptuous.

6. Manic thrashing, fuzzed to death, screaming vocals. It could have been recorded anytime between '69 and yesterday. Comes in a second over 3 minutes thus being the exception to the Jumper K 3 minute rule. Love it. Mrs Jumper K has just told me to act my age and turn it down as I'm scaring the cats.

7. Some bright and breezy soul-infused reggae. Sounds a bit like Eddy Grant. Not familiar with it though. There is almost a Stax feel to the backing horns. Good stuff mix dude.

8. Driving propulsive intro, gets into a groove real quick. Lots of electronic melody in the background, some guitar motif and groovy squonks and squeaks. Real summery vibe. Not bad.

9.Thunders and the Heartbreakers with Let Go. Dirty, sleazy just how I like my rock and roll. Its on the edge of shambolic but always pulls back form the edge. File under great, no two ways about it.

10. Some blues. Not sure who it is but there is some fantastic picking on it. Smooth vocal though. At a guess Big Bill but am probably wrong. As ever when I hear a blues track on the mix club I always think why don't I listen to more of it. Really enjoyed this.

11. Curtis with Pusherman. Funnily enough I had this on at the weekend. When you feel the need for wah wah slinky funk there is NO substitute.

12.Wow! Crazy. Bass heavy to the max, stupidly so. Drilling riff into my brain, awesome drumming. Just trying to turn up the volume. Ahh 10 seconds before I get the shout of doom! Its really simple and repetetive but just consumes you, when you think its going to end it goes up a notch with absurd sliding riff. Mad.

13.Just to slow down, Gillian with Wayside. Usual beautiful vocal and harmony. A real opposite to the previous track.

14. Psych wig out. Organ? check. Wild vocals? check. Arabic guitar motif? check. Love it. It is fairly derivative but still good enough to be engaging.

15. Soloman Burke. Cry To Me. Voice to die for. Lovely doo wop backing vocals. Simply Class.

16.Punk baby! Quite like the Ruts even down to the vocals. Heard it before, its familiar. Great cut off ending.

17. Kuepper and the Clowns. Live. Where is this from? Its bloody marvellous.

A most enjoyable mix. I think you might have pandered to my taste a little so a big thanks for that.
Looking forward to the reveal.

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby sloopjohnc » 17 Sep 2010, 04:09

Got mine a week ago. I've listened to it a couple/three times. Here's the review.

1. Hated the choir intro to this. When the beat and rap hit, it's good. I have no idea what this is until it's posted, then I'm sure I'll know.

2. Again, hated the intro. It sound like ODB, but later on it refers to Danger Mouse and MF Doom. This is funny at the end.

3. I liked this. Great urgent, angry rap with Johnny "Guitar" Watson background vocal in the back singing Superman Lover.

4. Great funk workout. Great drums.

5. I hated this guy's approach. Good lyrics, but it didn't make it for me. Kind of an Uncle Kracker thing going---better lyrics but just too novelty for my liking. If you're a white guy in rap, ya gotta come strong. This guy's gotta shtick for sure, but it ain't for me.

6. I like this. A good combo of electronica and toasting. The great bass helped.

7. This one was kinda irritating. I thought the bass and beat were great, but didn't like all the scratching and fading on the vocals.

8. I didn't like this at all. Some female electronica stuff. Danceable enough, but it didn't hang with the other stuff on the disc.

9. Starts out well with deep bass and funk guitar, but I got tired of this guy's Snoop ultra-stoner approach. Pass. I think this is Brit hip hop. Editorial comment: I hate the way they sacrifice beat and raps with effects.

10. This I loved. Some female toasters over some dub electronica. I have the same problem with this as the song before. Too much on the effects.

11. This was okay---I like the brief toasting over the music. Not enough bass though. I want the bass to make me take a shit.
Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good. . .

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby The Fish » 17 Sep 2010, 12:54

sloopjohnc wrote:A good combo of electronica and toasting.


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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby sloopjohnc » 17 Sep 2010, 14:44

The Fish wrote:
sloopjohnc wrote:A good combo of electronica and toasting.


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Isn't that what you English guys call a "mod con?"
Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good. . .

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Duncan » 17 Sep 2010, 15:56

[quote="sloopjohnc"]Got mine a week ago. I've listened to it a couple/three times. Here's the review.

Hey Sloop, this was mine. You seemed to be one of the few Mix-Clubbers that might be able to tolerate an entire disc of hip-hop/'urban' music so I thought that I'd take the opportunity. I think that we approach the genre from different angles, though.

1. Hated the choir intro to this. When the beat and rap hit, it's good. I have no idea what this is until it's posted, then I'm sure I'll know.

DM & Gemini - Ghetto Pop Life. The DM being DangerMouse. I think that it's the odd juxtaposition between the operatic intro and the first big beat that make this track.

2. Again, hated the intro. It sound like ODB, but later on it refers to Danger Mouse and MF Doom. This is funny at the end.

Dangerdoom - The Mask. More DangerMouse production, this time with MF Doom and Ghostface Killah providing the MC action.

3. I liked this. Great urgent, angry rap with Johnny "Guitar" Watson background vocal in the back singing Superman Lover.

Ghostface Killah - Supa GFK. I started off with the ambitious plan of linking each track with the one that preceded it, but abandoned that idea when it proved too restrictive. Anyway, this is probably my favourite Ghostface track.

4. Great funk workout. Great drums.

RJD2 - Good Times Roll (Part 2). RJD2 is one of my favourite exponents of big-beat, dancey turntablism. This track is loads of fun.

5. I hated this guy's approach. Good lyrics, but it didn't make it for me. Kind of an Uncle Kracker thing going---better lyrics but just too novelty for my liking. If you're a white guy in rap, ya gotta come strong. This guy's gotta shtick for sure, but it ain't for me.

Buck 65 - Wicked & Weird. I didn't think that anyone was capable of disliking this. It's probably more 'novelty' than a lot of his other stuff, but it's one of the most joyous. You win some, you lose some. Nevermind.

6. I like this. A good combo of electronica and toasting. The great bass helped.

Roots Manuva - Witness (One Hope). Some great dubby-hippity-hop. He's part of the venerable Ninja Tunes family.

7. This one was kinda irritating. I thought the bass and beat were great, but didn't like all the scratching and fading on the vocals.

Prefuse 73 - Point To Be. Warp goes hip-hop. Perhaps this doesn't really work out of context. He does some more straight-up stuff, although if you don't like the spliced, scratchy sampling then you probably won't be too blown away by the full albums either.

8. I didn't like this at all. Some female electronica stuff. Danceable enough, but it didn't hang with the other stuff on the disc.

Herbert (ft Dani Siciliano) - The Audience. I took a gamble with this one because its something that I've really been enjoying recently, although I can see why it might feel a little out of place.

9. Starts out well with deep bass and funk guitar, but I got tired of this guy's Snoop ultra-stoner approach. Pass. I think this is Brit hip hop. Editorial comment: I hate the way they sacrifice beat and raps with effects.

Tricky - Christiansands. This is obviously where we differ mostly. I'm all for big beats, big bass and big raps, but that can only take you so far. Knob-twiddling is a big part of hip-hop for me.

10. This I loved. Some female toasters over some dub electronica. I have the same problem with this as the song before. Too much on the effects.

The Bug (ft Warrior Queen) - Poison Dart. I make so many mix CDs for people that I sometimes lose track of what I'm doing. While writing this reveal it occurs to me that I used this track (and the next one) in my last months Mix Club mix. Poor form. I would resign in shame except that this track deserves to be on every mix I ever make.

11. This was okay---I like the brief toasting over the music. Not enough bass though. I want the bass to make me take a shit.

Kode 9 - Samurai. Some of the best dubstep of recent years - this is more about building up a dark, slightly unsettling atmosphere than making you soil yourself. It is best played loud though.[/quote]

I'm happy with the hit/miss ratio. As always, if you're after any further listening then just shout up. Thanks for listening...
Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb...

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TG
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Location: Boss Angeles

Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby TG » 17 Sep 2010, 21:49

This is my first mix club review, as well. It's a good deal of fun to get the CD in the mail and give it a few listens with a mind to reviewing it. It's a different listening experience. I like this game even if it does prove that no matter how much music you think you know there is a whole lot out there that you don't.

This CD is mostly hits with only a couple of misses. It's also chock full o' murder, mayhem, devils, demons, insanity and love gone away or astray. If I got this mix CD from an ex I'd be concerned for my safety. Since I'm pretty sure I have no exes around these parts I think it's pretty swell.

Track 1 - Starts with some nice banjo picking and my first thought was Dock Boggs or someone like that. Acoustic guitar follows and then vocals that show it to be something far more modern than Mr. Boggs. It seems to called Murder or maybe You're Killing Me. Nice instrumentation and ganged backing vocals. No idea who this might be but I like it. It's sort of Americana but I suspect it's not Americans.

Track 2 - Big distorted drums and cymbals, overdriven guitars and bass and lots of reverb. This is right where I like to be. Feels like some kind of Jesus and Mary Chain damage. I'm sure I know who this is but can't place it. Singing about a wicked something or other. I wish I knew what was wicked because I find myself singing this but can't quite make out the hook. I need to listen on better speakers and figure this out. It makes it's point and ends almost too soon. I like this track.

Track 3 - My first thought was that even though I've never heard Leonard Cohen this might be what he sounds like. On further listen I think it might be Richard Thompson. It sounds early. Maybe Fairport or something. It is, again, a great bit of instrumentation with banjo (I think) and organ featured prominently. No choruses, just verses and the droning banjo, organ thing. I quite like this, too.

Track 4 - You gotta love this. It's a 60's track seemingly called Demon Lover. It's a big Las Vegas, soundtrack sort of song/production. It's not Nancy Sinatra but she could have done a song like this. Ann Margaret, maybe? I'd have loved to hear The Cramps cover this. I can see pulling this out and playing it at a party or something. Great horn charts.

Track 5 - All right, now. Some real live R&B. This one features an insane asylum with a lover locked away inside. My initial thought was Screaming Jay Hawkins. Then I went with Andre Williams or Willie Dixon. But when the locked up female in the story begins her half of the duet I wasn't at all sure who it was. Another winner.

Track 6 - Very punk, very Brit, very heavy accents. Is this what they used to call Oi? I Hate Hippies. This one missed for me. The songs not strong enough to carry it.

Track 7 - Begins and ends with the sound of wind and rain. Very plaintive guitar, harmonica, whistling and vocals (male and female). Lo-fi and sad. Did the male half of Opal/Mazzy Star ever share vocals with the female half? If so, this could one of them. It feels like coming out from under sedation. Another winner.

Track 8 - Garage Rock. If this sounded a bit more modern it could be The Detroit Cobras. They should cover this. This would not be out of place on a Nuggets comp but I'm pretty sure it isn't on one. I thnk I recognize the vocalist but, once again, can't place this.

Track 9 - Dee Dee Sharp? Straight up Brill Building, probably a follow up to Mashed Potato Time. This one makes me wonder how I never heard it before. I own lots of records like this but somehow missed out on this. A fine piece of 60's teen pop. Bad Boy? I love the background vocals singing "He cheats, he cheats"

Track 10 - Another one I should know. I'll bet I'll know who the guitarist is once this is revealed. I recognize the style, I think. Another slab of Garage Rock. It starts out all surf guitar riff but quickly turns more 60s punk than SoCal instro.

Track 11 - This one begins with a preacher railing about people in psychiatric wards. I'd bet this comes out of Detroit. If not, then whoever this is has heard early MC5, Rationals, Bob Seger, etc. This might be my favorite track on the CD. Soul inflected vocals, big, crazed guitar solo, and then the preacher is back. I will buy this record once I know what it is.

Track 12 - These folks have a song I hear on some TV ad, I think. This is called Let's End It Here, I guess, and it ends the CD. This is the only other miss for me. Just not my cup of meat. Very modern compared to the rest of the tracks.

So, to the mystery mixer - you did a great job, considering the infrequency of my posts, in putting together a CD of songs that flat work for me. I can't wait to find out what's what.

Thanks. I can't wait for next month's installment.
Jeff K wrote:Not at all. I love TG. I might be the only one on BCB who does but I don't care.

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NickC
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby NickC » 17 Sep 2010, 22:55

TG wrote:This is my first mix club review, as well. It's a good deal of fun to get the CD in the mail and give it a few listens with a mind to reviewing it. It's a different listening experience. I like this game even if it does prove that no matter how much music you think you know there is a whole lot out there that you don't.

This CD is mostly hits with only a couple of misses. It's also chock full o' murder, mayhem, devils, demons, insanity and love gone away or astray. If I got this mix CD from an ex I'd be concerned for my safety. Since I'm pretty sure I have no exes around these parts I think it's pretty swell.
Hi TG. I was given the honour of providing you with your first ever BCB Mix. As you say, not being a frequent poster and a 'virgin' mixer it was hard to pinpoint what you would be interested in. But that wouldn't matter anyway, as I very rarely cater to my recipients tastes. You basically get what is on my deck at the present time. Anyway, here are the results..

Track 1 - Starts with some nice banjo picking and my first thought was Dock Boggs or someone like that. Acoustic guitar follows and then vocals that show it to be something far more modern than Mr. Boggs. It seems to called Murder or maybe You're Killing Me. Nice instrumentation and ganged backing vocals. No idea who this might be but I like it. It's sort of Americana but I suspect it's not Americans.
You are correct, they're not American! They hail from Brighton, England and they go by the moniker of The Curst Sons.

Track 2 - Big distorted drums and cymbals, overdriven guitars and bass and lots of reverb. This is right where I like to be. Feels like some kind of Jesus and Mary Chain damage. I'm sure I know who this is but can't place it. Singing about a wicked something or other. I wish I knew what was wicked because I find myself singing this but can't quite make out the hook. I need to listen on better speakers and figure this out. It makes it's point and ends almost too soon. I like this track.
This is Philadelphia's Asteroid #4. A great slice of psychedelic drone rock. They have that JAMC vibe with an element of shoegazing indy thrown in. The track is Wicked Wire.

Track 3 - My first thought was that even though I've never heard Leonard Cohen this might be what he sounds like. On further listen I think it might be Richard Thompson. It sounds early. Maybe Fairport or something. It is, again, a great bit of instrumentation with banjo (I think) and organ featured prominently. No choruses, just verses and the droning banjo, organ thing. I quite like this, too.
This is another touch of Americana, this time coming from 16 Horsepower spin off Woven Hand. Dark and sinister.

Track 4 - You gotta love this. It's a 60's track seemingly called Demon Lover. It's a big Las Vegas, soundtrack sort of song/production. It's not Nancy Sinatra but she could have done a song like this. Ann Margaret, maybe? I'd have loved to hear The Cramps cover this. I can see pulling this out and playing it at a party or something. Great horn charts.
This is a recent 45 find. Its Lynn Cornell and Demon Lover. I already had a single by a group called the Pearls, of which Lynn was a member, called Guilty.

Track 5 - All right, now. Some real live R&B. This one features an insane asylum with a lover locked away inside. My initial thought was Screaming Jay Hawkins. Then I went with Andre Williams or Willie Dixon. But when the locked up female in the story begins her half of the duet I wasn't at all sure who it was. Another winner.
You mention the Detroit Cobras in 8, but I have this track by the Cobras so I decided to search out the original. You are right with Willie Dixon, and the little powerhouse he duets with is the amazing Koko Taylor.

Track 6 - Very punk, very Brit, very heavy accents. Is this what they used to call Oi? I Hate Hippies. This one missed for me. The songs not strong enough to carry it.
Chucked in for a bit of fun. This is the Skinflicks with I hate hippies. Its something I play to annoy a mate who still wears flares and cheesecloth shirts.

Track 7 - Begins and ends with the sound of wind and rain. Very plaintive guitar, harmonica, whistling and vocals (male and female). Lo-fi and sad. Did the male half of Opal/Mazzy Star ever share vocals with the female half? If so, this could one of them. It feels like coming out from under sedation. Another winner.
A new discovery for me. Australians The Black Ryder. I love its dark and melancholy feel. Has an almost Mark Lanegan'ish flavour.

Track 8 - Garage Rock. If this sounded a bit more modern it could be The Detroit Cobras. They should cover this. This would not be out of place on a Nuggets comp but I'm pretty sure it isn't on one. I thnk I recognize the vocalist but, once again, can't place this.
These are my specialities. Another 45, this from 65. Its Jenny & the Rascals with Told me a lie. Dont you just love that twangy guitar answering her.

Track 9 - Dee Dee Sharp? Straight up Brill Building, probably a follow up to Mashed Potato Time. This one makes me wonder how I never heard it before. I own lots of records like this but somehow missed out on this. A fine piece of 60's teen pop. Bad Boy? I love the background vocals singing "He cheats, he cheats"
Again, this is from my favourite box of plastic. 1962 and the Donays with Bad boy. Classic girl group drama.

Track 10 - Another one I should know. I'll bet I'll know who the guitarist is once this is revealed. I recognize the style, I think. Another slab of Garage Rock. It starts out all surf guitar riff but quickly turns more 60s punk than SoCal instro.
From Ireland, this is bang upto date garage maestros The Urges. I have found myself quite drawn to these retro type bands lately. Another being Sweden's the Branded.

Track 11 - This one begins with a preacher railing about people in psychiatric wards. I'd bet this comes out of Detroit. If not, then whoever this is has heard early MC5, Rationals, Bob Seger, etc. This might be my favorite track on the CD. Soul inflected vocals, big, crazed guitar solo, and then the preacher is back. I will buy this record once I know what it is.
Proper stuff now eh! The one and only Fuzztones with Ward 81. This is from the vinyl album Lysergic Emanations.

Track 12 - These folks have a song I hear on some TV ad, I think. This is called Let's End It Here, I guess, and it ends the CD. This is the only other miss for me. Just not my cup of meat. Very modern compared to the rest of the tracks.
OK, fair dos. Something at complete odds to the rest..this is Ladytron and International Dateline.

Well, only two misses..thats great. Im pleased your first taste of the BCB Mix club was an enjoyable one. There will be many more to follow.

Thanks. I can't wait for next month's installment.


1. The Curst sons - Murder
2. Asteroid #4 - Wicked wire
3. Woven hand - Swedish purse
4. Lynn Cornell - Demon lover
5. Willy Dixon/Koko Taylor - Insane asylum
6. Skinflicks - I hate hippies
7. The black ryder - Sweet come down
8. Jackie & the rascals - Told me a lie
9. The Donays - Bad boy
10. The Urges - Urges theme
11. Fuzztones - Ward 81
12. Ladytron - International dateline
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sloopjohnc
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby sloopjohnc » 18 Sep 2010, 04:00

Sgt Pepper wrote:
sloopjohnc wrote:Got mine a week ago. I've listened to it a couple/three times. Here's the review.

Hey Sloop, this was mine. You seemed to be one of the few Mix-Clubbers that might be able to tolerate an entire disc of hip-hop/'urban' music so I thought that I'd take the opportunity. I think that we approach the genre from different angles, though.

1. Hated the choir intro to this. When the beat and rap hit, it's good. I have no idea what this is until it's posted, then I'm sure I'll know.

DM & Gemini - Ghetto Pop Life. The DM being DangerMouse. I think that it's the odd juxtaposition between the operatic intro and the first big beat that make this track.

2. Again, hated the intro. It sound like ODB, but later on it refers to Danger Mouse and MF Doom. This is funny at the end.

Dangerdoom - The Mask. More DangerMouse production, this time with MF Doom and Ghostface Killah providing the MC action.

3. I liked this. Great urgent, angry rap with Johnny "Guitar" Watson background vocal in the back singing Superman Lover.

Ghostface Killah - Supa GFK. I started off with the ambitious plan of linking each track with the one that preceded it, but abandoned that idea when it proved too restrictive. Anyway, this is probably my favourite Ghostface track.

4. Great funk workout. Great drums.

RJD2 - Good Times Roll (Part 2). RJD2 is one of my favourite exponents of big-beat, dancey turntablism. This track is loads of fun.

5. I hated this guy's approach. Good lyrics, but it didn't make it for me. Kind of an Uncle Kracker thing going---better lyrics but just too novelty for my liking. If you're a white guy in rap, ya gotta come strong. This guy's gotta shtick for sure, but it ain't for me.

Buck 65 - Wicked & Weird. I didn't think that anyone was capable of disliking this. It's probably more 'novelty' than a lot of his other stuff, but it's one of the most joyous. You win some, you lose some. Nevermind.

6. I like this. A good combo of electronica and toasting. The great bass helped.

Roots Manuva - Witness (One Hope). Some great dubby-hippity-hop. He's part of the venerable Ninja Tunes family.

7. This one was kinda irritating. I thought the bass and beat were great, but didn't like all the scratching and fading on the vocals.

Prefuse 73 - Point To Be. Warp goes hip-hop. Perhaps this doesn't really work out of context. He does some more straight-up stuff, although if you don't like the spliced, scratchy sampling then you probably won't be too blown away by the full albums either.

8. I didn't like this at all. Some female electronica stuff. Danceable enough, but it didn't hang with the other stuff on the disc.

Herbert (ft Dani Siciliano) - The Audience. I took a gamble with this one because its something that I've really been enjoying recently, although I can see why it might feel a little out of place.

9. Starts out well with deep bass and funk guitar, but I got tired of this guy's Snoop ultra-stoner approach. Pass. I think this is Brit hip hop. Editorial comment: I hate the way they sacrifice beat and raps with effects.

Tricky - Christiansands. This is obviously where we differ mostly. I'm all for big beats, big bass and big raps, but that can only take you so far. Knob-twiddling is a big part of hip-hop for me.

10. This I loved. Some female toasters over some dub electronica. I have the same problem with this as the song before. Too much on the effects.

The Bug (ft Warrior Queen) - Poison Dart. I make so many mix CDs for people that I sometimes lose track of what I'm doing. While writing this reveal it occurs to me that I used this track (and the next one) in my last months Mix Club mix. Poor form. I would resign in shame except that this track deserves to be on every mix I ever make.

11. This was okay---I like the brief toasting over the music. Not enough bass though. I want the bass to make me take a shit.

Kode 9 - Samurai. Some of the best dubstep of recent years - this is more about building up a dark, slightly unsettling atmosphere than making you soil yourself. It is best played loud though.[/quote]

I'm happy with the hit/miss ratio. As always, if you're after any further listening then just shout up. Thanks for listening...


The hit/miss ratio was definitely up there. A keeper. Thanks.
Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good. . .

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Magilla
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Magilla » 18 Sep 2010, 10:00

Jumper k wrote:All the way from the Land of the Long White Cloud comes a very good mix of spiky rock and roll goodness, smooth soul with some oddities thrown in making it a winner round my way. Some is familiar some I havn't got a scooby.


Gidday Frank, it was with some trepidation that I sent the mix, so I'm pretty pleased my hunchs were right. As with most mixes I do, I had a look at your tastes and tried to chuck in a bunch of songs I thought you'd like, but wouldn't be too familiar with.

Track 1. Kicking Off with the mighty Terrorways and Short Haired Rock and Roll. A prime cut of Auckland punk from 1980. First heard this on the AK79 comp that Dirk, a mate from Karitane, introduced me to when I was working in London. Still got his home taped cassette copy. Smart!


That's them ! I figured you'd enjoy a song that hinted at both punk and r 'n' r, two of your loves. The entire AK79 comp is a total classic. I suggest you track down the CD re-issue, as there's twice as many songs on it now, so more punk bleters to check out. Karitane ? We'd probably know some of the same people, I expect.
Get Crud to explain the Auckland punk scene to you, should you meet-up with him when he's over there in October, he saw all this first-hand.

2. Starts out like R Dean Taylor and then gets into an almost Gang of Four punk funk groove. Sneering vocals about big fat Elvis. Some good riffing with a fairly basic backbeat. Interesting, I think its possibly early to mid 80's.


Doublehappys, 'Big Fat Elvis' from Nerves. Yep, they were an early-mid '80s Dunedin band that was destined for big things before one of the guitarists died in an accident. Nerves is a good comp of their single and EPs, most of which sound along these lines. Shayne Carter, the singer-guitarist here, went on to front the illustrious Straitjacket Fits and now leads Dimmer.

3. Its Jazz! Not unpleasant either. Nice bass intro which morphs into some frantic rhythm and sax playing. Slows down into cool lounge style after a minute with sweet piano motif, picking up again with bass and sax.
I've no idea who this is but they are tight and its not too dischordant but on the edge of my jazz listening comfort zone. I could listen to more along the same lines.


Sonny Rollins, 'Street Runner With Child' from Alfie soundtrack. I'm not too sure how much into jazz you are, but if you like this, well, the rest of Rollins' key albums are a treat.

4. Jesus the riff is low and dirty. Basic descending chords with someone who sounds like Danzig. Don't think its Misfits. Superb outro goes off into the stratosphere. Swings like a mofo though. Nice!


Wipers, 'Can This Be' from Youth Of America / Over The Edge two-fer. A pretty obscure US post-punk band. I thought you'd like the full-on buzzsaw guitars here. Half of their stuff is along these lines, the other half is more (to me) vaguely like early '80s Cure without the goth stench, but don't let that put you of investigating them.

5. God Is Standing By. Soulful goodness from the Reverend Al. It has a swing all of its own and of course the backing vocals are sumptuous.


Most certainly is.

6. Manic thrashing, fuzzed to death, screaming vocals. It could have been recorded anytime between '69 and yesterday. Comes in a second over 3 minutes thus being the exception to the Jumper K 3 minute rule. Love it. Mrs Jumper K has just told me to act my age and turn it down as I'm scaring the cats.


Comets On Fire, 'Holy Teeth' from Avatar. I'm really pleased you like this, as this was one song I thought you might hate. Comets On Fire are contemporary US outfit ,that've done four or so albums, all loaded up with intense stuff like this. Most of their songs go for about five minutes, however, but if you're prepared to make an exception for these guys, I'm sure you'll enjoy them.

7. Some bright and breezy soul-infused reggae. Sounds a bit like Eddy Grant. Not familiar with it though. There is almost a Stax feel to the backing horns. Good stuff mix dude.


Toots & the Maytals, 'Rhythm Down Low' from Pass The Pipe. The guy's a legend, deservedly.

8. Driving propulsive intro, gets into a groove real quick. Lots of electronic melody in the background, some guitar motif and groovy squonks and squeaks. Real summery vibe. Not bad.


Harmonia, 'Dino' from Musik Von Harmonia. This one was a real gamble as well, but I noticed you'd put some Kraftwerk on a previous mix, so I figured this wouldn't be too much off a stretch. Anyway, these guys were contemporaries of Kraftwerk, same producer, etc, etc. Guitarist Michael Rother was in NEU! and the other two comprised Cluster, should you want more of the same.

9.Thunders and the Heartbreakers with Let Go. Dirty, sleazy just how I like my rock and roll. Its on the edge of shambolic but always pulls back form the edge. File under great, no two ways about it.


I agree. L.A.M.F is under-rated, imho.

10. Some blues. Not sure who it is but there is some fantastic picking on it. Smooth vocal though. At a guess Big Bill but am probably wrong. As ever when I hear a blues track on the mix club I always think why don't I listen to more of it. Really enjoyed this.


It is Big Bill ! This is 'How You Want It Done' from The Young...A little blues goes a long way with me, but I'm quite comfortable with acoustic blues and at the other extreme Gun Club-type stuff, but have no stomach for blues-rock, etc.

11. Curtis with Pusherman. Funnily enough I had this on at the weekend. When you feel the need for wah wah slinky funk there is NO substitute.


Too right.

12.Wow! Crazy. Bass heavy to the max, stupidly so. Drilling riff into my brain, awesome drumming. Just trying to turn up the volume. Ahh 10 seconds before I get the shout of doom! Its really simple and repetetive but just consumes you, when you think its going to end it goes up a notch with absurd sliding riff. Mad.


Lightning Bolt, 'Assassins' from Wonderful Rainbow. Real full-on, pummeling stuff, isn't it ? Another contemporary US act. Most of their songs only go for three or four minutes, you'll be pleased to know.

13.Just to slow down, Gillian with Wayside. Usual beautiful vocal and harmony. A real opposite to the previous track.


I thought it'd make a good contrast. I think she's wonderful and will eventually become a big part of the country canon.

14. Psych wig out. Organ? check. Wild vocals? check. Arabic guitar motif? check. Love it. It is fairly derivative but still good enough to be engaging.


Early '90s NZ trio King Loser, specialists in a wiggy, sleazy cross between surf and psych.

15. Soloman Burke. Cry To Me. Voice to die for. Lovely doo wop backing vocals. Simply Class.


Most certainly is.

16.Punk baby! Quite like the Ruts even down to the vocals. Heard it before, its familiar. Great cut off ending.


Dirk from Karitane may've taped you this as well. It's late '70s, early '80s Auckland punks No Tag with 'Legalised Dogs'. They did an album called Can We Get Away With It? but I'm unsure it was ever re-issued on CD. Anyway, I got this on the It's Bigger Than Both Of Us 2CD comp of assorted NZ punk, post-punk, new wave singles.

17. Kuepper and the Clowns. Live. Where is this from? Its bloody marvellous.


Bloody oath it is. A great live version of 'Theme From Mad Flies, Mad Flies'. It's from a Jan 2009 live album simply called Laughing Clowns Live, which Mentalist very kindly sent me a copy of a year or so ago. I was considering putting on the 14min-long version of 'Collapse Board' or the 13min-long version of 'Eternally Yours.' :P
It's sub-titled "The Prince Melon Bootleg Series volume 7" which suggests there's at least six (!!) other great Clowns live CDs out there I'll have to track down.

A most enjoyable mix. I think you might have pandered to my taste a little so a big thanks for that.
Looking forward to the reveal.


Hey cheers, glad you enjoyed it ! Feel free to *cough* for anything.

TRACKLIST:

1) Terrorways - Short Haired Rock N Roll, 2.07.
2) Doublehappys - Big Fat Elvis, 3.03.
3) Sonny Rollins - Street Runner With Child, 3.59.
4) Wipers - Can This Be, 2.58.
5) Al Green - God Is Standing By, 3.14.
6) Comets On Fire - Holy Teeth, 2.59.
7) Toots & the Maytals - Rhythm Down Low, 3.29.
8) Harmonia - Dino, 3.30.
9) Johnny Thunders - Let Go, 2.25.
10) Big Bill Broonzy - How You Want It Done, 2.52.
11) Curtis Mayfield - Pusherman, 5.05.
12) Lightning Bolt - Assassins, 3.44.
13) Gillian Welch - Wayside / Back In Time, 3.28.
14) King Loser - Broken Man, 2.55.
15) Solomon Burke - Cry To Me, 2.35.
16) No Tag - Legalised Dogs, 2.55.
17) Laughing Clowns - Theme From Mad Flies, Mad Flies, 4.56.
"U2 routinely spent a year in the studio...I have a theory: if you put four monkeys in the studio for a year with Lanois and Eno and Lillywhite, they would make a pretty good record, too."

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Nolamike » 19 Sep 2010, 16:34

The Fish wrote:
Nolamike wrote:
Track Eleven
Sounds like a modern band trying to do Smokey Robinson, but it works really well. There's some falsetto male vocals with harmony, a stripped-down soulful arrangement with a clean riffy guitar and tambourine, and some nice orchestration that comes in at the choruses. Nice!

It is imdeed recent. It's Raphael Saadiq. One of the few modern soul acts who manage to sound retro without being slavishly so




OK, so I just looked him up - he was the dude in Tony! Toni! Tone!, which was what I was going to guess in my first draft, but figured, "nah, nobody listens to that band anymore." :lol: I had no idea he'd gone on to do his own thing, and actually got kinda big doing it. :oops:
Sir John Coan wrote:Nolamike is speaking nothing but sense here.


Loki wrote:Mike is Hookfinger's shill.

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Moleskin » 21 Sep 2010, 09:22

Firstly, thank you very kindly for my mix. It's had a right seeing-to over the last week or so, mostly in the car. Overall it worked well and there was nothing on it I actively disliked.

So here's the review --

1. I've convinced myself that this is Lindsey Buckingham. It's the voice. Crunchy guitars and a rhythm reminiscent of 'Big Love' era Mac. The mid section meanwhile sounds a little like Arcade Fire.

2. This is another familiar voice, and after some cosnideration of the piano/organ led nature of the track I think it might be Gary Brooker and/or Procol Harum.

3. This is piano based, with musical quotes from an oldie (soft-shoe/tap style). It's a bit Noah-and-the-Whale in places. I expepct it's called 'The Time Of My Life' or similar. One I'd like to know more about.

4. Cat Stevens - 'When My Kitty Gets Out'. Hi svoice is immediately recognisable on the chorus. From one of his sixties albums I assume.

5. Another indie voice, this one female. Nice handclaps on the rhythm track. Piano led with some picked guitar and punctuating chords. Fave #2.

6. Intro could be from something by Vernon Elliott. Nice woodwind. The song has an old feel, like one of Gilbert O'Sullivan's works ('Matrimony' perhaps). The vocal is deliberately aged to the 1930s. I like this - well orchestrated.

7. I'm pretty sure I've had this on a mix before. 'Low Down Dirty Weakness' which I think I identified as being by Peter Perrett but which isn't. The fiddle + guitar + drums backing makes it sound like the Levellers, frankly.

8. A little acappella interlude, two or three voices about wanting to be a pharmacist.

9. This is probably late 60s, it's got that soft-psych / acid-folk sort of vibe. Like it, this is aimed squarely at the era where I live.

10. Love the scary electronic intro! His voice isn't quite up to much, but it really works well with the distorto backing.

11. Lovely girl vocals with a string section - the arrangement reminiscent of James Bond themes. The pop band backing could be a grown-up Belle and Sebastian. Fave #3.

12. David Crosby - 'Yvette In English'. Proof he could still sing after the years of abuse.

13. 'Swans on the Canal'. Very reminiscent of the Bee Gees - in that same era as number 9 above I'd say. Lovely, and another fave.

14. A semi-folky number with Stuing's favourite synth pad in the background. Still this is a good song if not a top pick. Most likely called 'Spanish Dancer'.

15. Some dramatic strings on this, and some slightly overcooked vocals. At times it verges rather too closely on something from a modern musical.

16. This is more like it. Banjo and a smoky voice singing us a 'Prairie Lullaby'.

There's definitely some stuff on here I want to follow up. Numbers 3, 5, 9, 11 and 13 were my top picks.
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby whodathunkit » 21 Sep 2010, 18:55

comrade moleskin wrote:Firstly, thank you very kindly for my mix. It's had a right seeing-to over the last week or so, mostly in the car. Overall it worked well and there was nothing on it I actively disliked.

So here's the review --


My turn this month, Simon. Here's the reveal..

1. I've convinced myself that this is Lindsey Buckingham. It's the voice. Crunchy guitars and a rhythm reminiscent of 'Big Love' era Mac. The mid section meanwhile sounds a little like Arcade Fire.

One of my favourite individual tracks of this year, "Life Coach" by American indie band Fang Island from their eponymous debut. I liked it so much I bought the album only to find that this was their one decent song.

2. This is another familiar voice, and after some cosnideration of the piano/organ led nature of the track I think it might be Gary Brooker and/or Procol Harum.

"As Strong As Samson" from Procul's 1974 effort, Exotic Birds And Fruit. Loads of gems to be found on their later albums (amongst some dross) and , for me, Brooker has one of the great rock voices.

3. This is piano based, with musical quotes from an oldie (soft-shoe/tap style). It's a bit Noah-and-the-Whale in places. I expepct it's called 'The Time Of My Life' or similar. One I'd like to know more about.

A chap from Stourbridge called Rob Jones who unfortunately records under the name The Voluntary Butler Scheme. This is "Night Driver" from last year's debut which gets a little over-whimsical and naive at times. I reckon he's probably got a great second album in him though. One to watch out for.

4. Cat Stevens - 'When My Kitty Gets Out'. Hi svoice is immediately recognisable on the chorus. From one of his sixties albums I assume.

Back before all that spiritual questing, Cat Stevens used to make damn good pop records. Here's one - a single from 1967, "Kitty".

5. Another indie voice, this one female. Nice handclaps on the rhythm track. Piano led with some picked guitar and punctuating chords. Fave #2.

Tracey Thorn from this year's Love And It's Opposite and a nice witty song about parents, adolescents, etc , "Hormones".

6. Intro could be from something by Vernon Elliott. Nice woodwind. The song has an old feel, like one of Gilbert O'Sullivan's works ('Matrimony' perhaps). The vocal is deliberately aged to the 1930s. I like this - well orchestrated.

It is Mr O'Sullivan. He was just called Gilbert then. I'm pretty sure that this was his first single, "Disappear". Strange to think that he was hip enough then for Peel to play this all the time.

7. I'm pretty sure I've had this on a mix before. 'Low Down Dirty Weakness' which I think I identified as being by Peter Perrett but which isn't. The fiddle + guitar + drums backing makes it sound like the Levellers, frankly.

Tymon Dogg who used to be just Timon (of "Bitter Thoughts Of Little Jane" fame). I included a track by Mr Dogg on a mix for Neville Harp once and he described it as a voice only a mother could love. From "Battle Of Wills" (1982).

8. A little acappella interlude, two or three voices about wanting to be a pharmacist.

The mythical Kipper Family from the equally mythical Norfolk village of Trunch and "To Be A Pharmacist" I always think of them when I see your address.

9. This is probably late 60s, it's got that soft-psych / acid-folk sort of vibe. Like it, this is aimed squarely at the era where I live.

Cliff Wade was a sort of 60s version of John Otway or perhaps Ted Chippington - really naff songs but with a remorseless charm. I really only included this for it's title, "Look At Me, I've Fallen Into a Teapot" .

10. Love the scary electronic intro! His voice isn't quite up to much, but it really works well with the distorto backing.

Finally invested in this after years of seeing it recommended on cult album lists and blogs, etc.- "World Of Echo" by American cellist/avant-gardeist/singer-songwriter and disco pioneer Arthur Russell. I can't say I quite "get" it yet. This is about the most approachable track on it, "Let's Go Swimming".

11. Lovely girl vocals with a string section - the arrangement reminiscent of James Bond themes. The pop band backing could be a grown-up Belle and Sebastian. Fave #3.

B&S spin-off project God Help The Girl and "Come Monday Night". This was a single. Never heard the album. Apparently there will be a film eventually which should be a red letter day on BCB. :lol:

12. David Crosby - 'Yvette In English'. Proof he could still sing after the years of abuse.

Yep. Nice Joni Mitchell song nicely song by old walrus face.

13. 'Swans on the Canal'. Very reminiscent of the Bee Gees - in that same era as number 9 above I'd say. Lovely, and another fave.

I know you're fond of a bit of "Toast And Marmalade For Tea" so this is the other decent track on Tin Tin's only album.

14. A semi-folky number with Stuing's favourite synth pad in the background. Still this is a good song if not a top pick. Most likely called 'Spanish Dancer'.

Mrs Boss - Patti Scialfa from Rumble Doll(1993]. Bruce leaves his mrs, shacks up with Patti and produces an album for her - a certain recipe for disaster. But it's a gorgeous record. All her other stuff is crap though :D

15. Some dramatic strings on this, and some slightly overcooked vocals. At times it verges rather too closely on something from a modern musical.

Totally OTT. Joe Jackson and "Sentimental Friend" from Blaze Of Glory(1989). Sometimes I like the kitchen sink in there as well.

16. This is more like it. Banjo and a smoky voice singing us a 'Prairie Lullaby'.

From my current favourite album, "Gift" by Norma Waterson and Eliza Carthy.

There's definitely some stuff on here I want to follow up. Numbers 3, 5, 9, 11 and 13 were my top picks.

Glad it went down okay Simon. I'll sort out some cough medicine for you sometime.

1. "Life Coach" - Fang Island
2. "As Strong As Samson" - Procul Harum
3. "Night Driver" - The Voluntary Butler Scheme
4. "Kitty" - Cat Stevens
5. "Hormones" - Tracey Thorn
6. "Disappear" - Gilbert
7. "Low Down Dirty Weakness" - Tymon Dogg
8. "To Be A Pharmacist" - The Kipper Family
9. "Look At Me I've Fallen Into A Teapot" - Cliff Wade
10. "Let's Go Swimming" - Arthur Russell
11. "Come Monday Night" - God Help The Girl
12. "Yvette In English" - David Crosby
13. "Swans On The Canal" - TinTin
14. "Spanish Dancer" - Patti Scialfa
15. "Sentimental Friend" - Joe Jackson
16. "Prairie Lullaby" - Eliza Carthy
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Moleskin
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Moleskin » 21 Sep 2010, 20:38

Thank you for that! I should really have got Eliza, I own several of the albums she's recorded alone and with her family. Still it wouldn't be mix club without at least one 'doh!' moment.
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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby PENK » 23 Sep 2010, 12:43

Interesting mix for me this month, more towards a jazz and soul groove; one that really works as a compilation, too, with a nice but slow start gradually picking up as we get further in. Thanks!

Track 1 - Lively bluesy soul, a good opening.

Track 2 - And now a generic jazz groove. It's nice and cool and all that, but does nothing I haven't heard several zillion other things do... though there is a nice kind of Pacific lilt to the guitar bits.

Track 3 - More jazzy sounds, this one a groover with crowd noises thrown in. Again, it's pleasant but a bit generic.

Track 4 - More laidback jazzy thing with weird noises in lieu of percussion. Still nice without really taking off.

Track 5 - And now things perk up a bit with a soul side; unfortunately it is - despite its catchiness - a rather naff '70s production, replete with horrible bass and overly smooth vocals. There are some interesting guitar things going on near the end, however, which redeem it a bit.

Track 6 - This is better - a funky number with organ and twiddly guitar. One of those tracks that works despite all the instruments apparently doing their own thing without bothering to pay attention to what the rest are up to.

Track 7 - Still with the funky jazz. I like this one, the best yet. Nice flute groove, a guy jabbering wild nonsense and some real drive and bounce.

Track 8 - Ah, Jorge Ben with 'Take It Easy My Brother Charles'. Lovely stuff.

Track 9 - These people are telling me that they're going to be funky until the day they die. And who am I to argue? Entertaining, skittery funk; again, sounds like it's more of a '70s cut.

Track 10 - Intriguing cover of Dr John's 'Right Place Wrong Time'. Works pretty well.

Track 11 - Strong political psych-soul number. Good horns. Liked this one.

Track 12 - Likable Northern Soul number. Sounds kind of familiar. Another good pick.

Track 13 - Big old belter to finish with. This bloke and his ladies want us to go get stoned. Another cool track.

So as I said, this really worked overall, with a good mood established and held. And the further in we went, the more I liked the individual tracks - definitely some keepers here.
Thanks again!
Darkness_Fish wrote:One slight disappointment was that there turns out to be two cinemas in Bolton

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby Jumper k » 23 Sep 2010, 15:11

Magilla wrote:Hey cheers, glad you enjoyed it ! Feel free to *cough* for anything.

TRACKLIST:

1) Terrorways - Short Haired Rock N Roll, 2.07.
2) Doublehappys - Big Fat Elvis, 3.03.
3) Sonny Rollins - Street Runner With Child, 3.59.
4) Wipers - Can This Be, 2.58.
5) Al Green - God Is Standing By, 3.14.
6) Comets On Fire - Holy Teeth, 2.59.
7) Toots & the Maytals - Rhythm Down Low, 3.29.
8) Harmonia - Dino, 3.30.
9) Johnny Thunders - Let Go, 2.25.
10) Big Bill Broonzy - How You Want It Done, 2.52.
11) Curtis Mayfield - Pusherman, 5.05.
12) Lightning Bolt - Assassins, 3.44.
13) Gillian Welch - Wayside / Back In Time, 3.28.
14) King Loser - Broken Man, 2.55.
15) Solomon Burke - Cry To Me, 2.35.
16) No Tag - Legalised Dogs, 2.55.
17) Laughing Clowns - Theme From Mad Flies, Mad Flies, 4.56.

Cheers Grant. I actually have the Wipers but havn't pulled it out for yonks. Love the King loser, will try and find some more, and have acquired the Lightning Bolt. No Tag are on the AK79 comp I have, I'll look into getting the lp and the Clowns live stuff. Had no idea these are available which is inexcusable for a major Kuepper freak. :oops:

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Re: September 2010 Reviews

Postby WG Kaspar » 23 Sep 2010, 18:46

penk wrote:Interesting mix for me this month, more towards a jazz and soul groove; one that really works as a compilation, too, with a nice but slow start gradually picking up as we get further in. Thanks!

Hi penk, it was I who was your mixer this month.

Track 1 - Lively bluesy soul, a good opening.

Kickin' off with Big Mama Thornton and Wade In The Water off her debut Ball And Chain (I think it's her debut anyway). I think it's a right bit of dynamite this one.

Track 2 - And now a generic jazz groove. It's nice and cool and all that, but does nothing I haven't heard several zillion other things do... though there is a nice kind of Pacific lilt to the guitar bits.

Obviously my intention was to make this mix as consistent in mood as possible so as per usual it's the one track that dictates where the mix is going and in this case this was the one. This is Lou Donaldson with Rev. Moses off his (probably) funkiest album Aligator Boogaloo.

Track 3 - More jazzy sounds, this one a groover with crowd noises thrown in. Again, it's pleasant but a bit generic.

This is Cannonball Adderley with Why Am I Treated So Bad, taken off a David Axelrod comp. It does have a slightly a late 60's Bullit-style vide. I'm not sure I'd call it generic though.

Track 4 - More laidback jazzy thing with weird noises in lieu of percussion. Still nice without really taking off.

Going back to the late 40's this is a track I just had to put in once the mood of the mix was decided. This is Willie Dixon with Walkin' The Blues and I believe it's as cool a blues track as any I've heard. And not taking off is probably the reason why :D

Track 5 - And now things perk up a bit with a soul side; unfortunately it is - despite its catchiness - a rather naff '70s production, replete with horrible bass and overly smooth vocals. There are some interesting guitar things going on near the end, however, which redeem it a bit.

Oooh now you hurt my feelings man. This is Little Beaver with I Can dig It Baby off his 1974 album Party Down. I suppose if you don't like this kind of production on a record you'll not gonna listen to the rest of the album but again I think the atmosphere of the thing is just fantastic, I don't believe that you can get a funk number with a more relaxed vibe.

Track 6 - This is better - a funky number with organ and twiddly guitar. One of those tracks that works despite all the instruments apparently doing their own thing without bothering to pay attention to what the rest are up to.

A bit more modern stuff this off the Ocean's Twelve soundtrack this is LSD Partie from Roland Vincent. The movie may have been utter toss but the soundtrack is pretty fuckin' great.

Track 7 - Still with the funky jazz. I like this one, the best yet. Nice flute groove, a guy jabbering wild nonsense and some real drive and bounce.

Another one off a comp this is Chitterlings Con Carne from Pucho & His Latin Soul Brother. The compilation is Pulp Fusion.

Track 8 - Ah, Jorge Ben with 'Take It Easy My Brother Charles'. Lovely stuff.

Indeed. I recently got a bunch of Tropicalia albums and I just had to stick one in there ( :? ).

Track 9 - These people are telling me that they're going to be funky until the day they die. And who am I to argue? Entertaining, skittery funk; again, sounds like it's more of a '70s cut.

The Southern Energy Ensemble with F-U-N-K-Y Til The Day I Die off their s/t album. It's amazing what sort of crap one can unearth in blogs.

Track 10 - Intriguing cover of Dr John's 'Right Place Wrong Time'. Works pretty well.

Well I for one am not familiar with Dr John's version to be honest. This is some guy called Ray J and this was taken from the rather excellent comp New Orlean's Funk vol.2. I might have to check some Dr. John stuff after all.

Track 11 - Strong political psych-soul number. Good horns. Liked this one.

I'm surprised you didn't call that one, at least the band. It's The Temptations with Ungena Za Ulimgwegu(Unite The World) taken off Solid Air. Typical Whitfield groove. I do love all the Tempts albums from that period.

Track 12 - Likable Northern Soul number. Sounds kind of familiar. Another good pick.

Sandie Seldon with You're Gonna Make Me Love You. Not a huge fan of Northern Soul myself but in every comp of its kind there's a few that get me.

Track 13 - Big old belter to finish with. This bloke and his ladies want us to go get stoned. Another cool track.

My favourite bluesman bar none, this is Lowell Fulsome with Let's Go Set Stoned off his 1968 album Now.

So as I said, this really worked overall, with a good mood established and held. And the further in we went, the more I liked the individual tracks - definitely some keepers here.
Thanks again!


Glad it worked. Truth be told the sequencing was a bastard. Anyway here's the full tracklist.

1. Wade In The Water - Big Mama Thornton
2. Rev. Moses - Lou Donaldson
3. Why Am I Treated So Bad? - Cannonball Adderley
4. Walkin' The Blues - Willie Dixon
5. I Can Dig It Baby - Little Beaver
6. LSD Partie - Ronald Vincent
7. Chitterlings Con Carne - Pucho & His Latin Soul Brother
8. Take It Easy My Brother Charlie - Jorge Ben
9. F-U-N-K-Y Til The Day I Die- The Southern Energy Ensemble
10. Right Place, Wrong Time - Ray J
11. Ungena Za Ulimgwegu(Unite The World) - the Temptations
12. You're Gonna Make Me Love You - Sandie Seldon
13. Let's Go Get Stoned - Lowell Fulsome
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