August 2015 Review

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Walk In My Shadow
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August 2015 Review

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 05 Aug 2015, 19:55

01. This guy played with Hounddog Taylor so he says. Gravel voiced and obviously an American. More a groove than a song but exciting stuff.
02. This is probably THE funkiest grooviest band out of New Orleans. It’s Galactic and I love their strut.
03. An organ led instrumental heavy on the horns. Fifties/Sixties stuff? It’s alright but not special.
04. Five o’clock world by the Vogues. I remember this from when I was young. Good one and not heard in a long while.
05. The real Soul version of Piece of my heart. Made popular by Janis but I like this one better. No idea who this is.
06. Male mid tempo Soul song. What’s not to like. Don’t know the singer though.
07. These are the Red Devils. Man, I played King King to death. Dear mixer, I take it you’re also familiar with Lester Butler’s 13 cd?
08. Now what is this? A sudden change to a slow psych tune. Strange but I rather like it in a Pretty Things kinda way.
09. Morning Dew, a classic. I hesitate between Tim Rose and Long John Baldry.
10. James Hunter, no doubt. Love the guy and used a tune of his in one of my mixes too.
11. A Soul stomper of the James Brown kind. Another winner but unknown to me.
12. This reminds me of Sleepwalkin’, a guitar led instrumental. See track 3.
13. Swing is the thing, another speedier two guitar instrumental.
14. Jump Blues by Slim Harpo I think.
15. A slow burner dancing on one tile. Great!
16. And we end with another slow instrumental. This the best of the lot.


Thank you, dear mixer. A strong effort and I really enjoyed it very much. Lots of great tunes known and unknown. Looking forward to the reveal!
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TG
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby TG » 19 Aug 2015, 17:24

Walk In My Shadow wrote:


I was your mixer this month/quarter/time period and you got one of my world famous "Here are some things I've recently purchased and a couple of other things I've been digging lately" mixes.

01. This guy played with Hounddog Taylor so he says. Gravel voiced and obviously an American. More a groove than a song but exciting stuff.

Elvin Bishop, of all people. This is from a Tribute to Hound Dog Taylor CD and was the best track, by far.

02. This is probably THE funkiest grooviest band out of New Orleans. It’s Galactic and I love their strut.

Indeed, it is and they are a fine, fine band. This one is called Black Eyed Pea.

03. An organ led instrumental heavy on the horns. Fifties/Sixties stuff? It’s alright but not special.

Not that special?!? One Mint Julep by Ray Charles is not that special? Please listen again.

04. Five o’clock world by the Vogues. I remember this from when I was young. Good one and not heard in a long while.

I stumbled into this while looking for something else and it sounded so good that I played it several days in a row. It's a swell little track with probably the worst time keeping drummer in the history of hit records. It's so bad that I put a metronome on it. The time keeping is atrocious. Just goes to show that none of that matters if you've got the right song and the right performer, etc. A hit is a hit is a hit and can't be denied.

05. The real Soul version of Piece of my heart. Made popular by Janis but I like this one better. No idea who this is.

Aretha's sister Erma Franklin. And this is way better than Janis' perfectly fine version.

06. Male mid tempo Soul song. What’s not to like. Don’t know the singer though.

NOLA's Alvin "Shine" Robinson - a guitarist who played on loads of records you know - with a solo turn on Down Home Girl; a song that the Stones covered later.

07. These are the Red Devils. Man, I played King King to death. Dear mixer, I take it you’re also familiar with Lester Butler’s 13 cd?

I used to go see this band live a lot back before the King King days. They were great live. Never/Ever and I were driving around Hollywood after a Jolly Up blasting this CD out of my car stereo a few years back. I was surprised he was as familiar with them as he was. They made not a dent in the US. And now you, too are familiar with them. Life is full of little surprises.

And I'm not familiar with LB's 13 CD. What can you tell me about it?


08. Now what is this? A sudden change to a slow psych tune. Strange but I rather like it in a Pretty Things kinda way.

Painted Woman by The Druids of Stonehenge. I was in a thrift store digging through $1 CDs and they were playing this. It seemed kinda interesting so I picked it up. They were an interesting band who never wrote or found that hit that would break them nationally. They're a bit forgotten, now.

09. Morning Dew, a classic. I hesitate between Tim Rose and Long John Baldry.

Don't know if I've heard Baldry's version but Rose's is good.

10. James Hunter, no doubt. Love the guy and used a tune of his in one of my mixes too.

I'm a recent convert to Mr Hunter and I'm enjoying a lot of his music. This one is called Don't Come Back. He's a hell of a songwriter in the classic soul/R&B style of Sam Cooke and the like. And he can plays guitar like Lowman Pauling, to boot.

11. A Soul stomper of the James Brown kind. Another winner but unknown to me.

Home Sweet Home Pt 2 by Joe Hicks. A Sly Stone song/production - the first for his Stone Flower production company/record label.

12. This reminds me of Sleepwalkin’, a guitar led instrumental. See track 3.

Mudd by Roy Montrell; another fine NOLA guitarist who played on loads of other people's hits. And please see my reveal #3. ;)

13. Swing is the thing, another speedier two guitar instrumental.

Speedier, indeed. It's Speedy West and Jimmy Bryant doing Stratosphere Boogie.

14. Jump Blues by Slim Harpo I think.

Don't Start Cryin' Now by Slim Harpo. I love the guitar solo in this one.

15. A slow burner dancing on one tile. Great!

Huey "Piano" Smith and the Clowns' great singer Bobby Marchan with a solo track called Don't Take Your Love Away From Me. I love the oh, so melodramatic crying, etc. that he throws in.

16. And we end with another slow instrumental. This the best of the lot.

A single by the Rhine Oaks called Tampin. The Rhine Oaks were The Meters under another name on a different label and produced by Allen Toussaint. I swear it sounds like they slowed down the master tape on this. It's almost impossibly dragging. Like it's being recorded through molasses or something.

Thank you, dear mixer. A strong effort and I really enjoyed it very much. Lots of great tunes known and unknown. Looking forward to the reveal!

Sorry it took a while to get the reveal up. Now on to the review of the fine mix I received.

Let's Get Funky Elvin Bishop
Black Eyed Pea Galactic
One Mint Julep Ray Charles
Five O'Clock World The Vogues
Piece Of My Heart Erma Franklin
Down Home Girl Alvin Robinson
Devil Woman Red Devils
Painted Woman Druids Of Stonehenge
Morning Dew Tim Rose
Don't Come Back James Hunter
Home Sweet Home, Pt. 2 Joe Hicks
Mudd Roy Montrell
Stratosphere Boogie Speedy West & Jimmy Bryant
Don't Start Cryin' Now Slim Harpo
Don't Take Your Love From Me Bobby Marchan
Tampin (Single Version) The Rhine Oaks
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby bhoywonder » 20 Aug 2015, 10:20

1 – this sounds like a Dodgy b-side. And I say that from the position of liking Dodgy. It’s a reasonable mature piece of pop, but the bass irritates me. If this had some nice melodic electric bass, that would finish it off nicely.

2 – I like the Mariachi horns on this, and the electric guitars sounds great. Some top ride work there too, solid but neat. The song is fine, but the sound of the whole thing is what makes it. I don’t mind her singing either, pretty sultry.

3 – Lovely resonator on here. Good to hear the washboard too. And delicious bass, to boot. This is fun, and pleasant. The singing doesn’t do much for me, although it’s fine. Likewise the song feels a little lightweight, but as a vehicle for that playing, it’s more than justified.

4 – more sumptuous sounds. Love the beater on the toms, tasty, chunky electrics, warm bass and a delicate banjo. These guys know what they’re doing. I like this. I’d like to see them live, for sure. Lots of people make this kind of sound intentionally and deliberately, including the previous track, and that’s all fine, but these sound like the sound is just what naturally comes out when they play. They also sound a bit like how Siouxsie & the Banshees would have sounded had they come from Mississippi.

5 – less interest in this. It’s a good example of the style, but it’s a bit too polished for me, and maybe takes itself a bit more seriously than I do. It’s not quite bombastic but it’s on that train. Over produced for my tastes.

6 – another that does little for me. Well produced, but sounds pretty generic as a result. I can’t bring myself to pay attention to the story, my mind wanders, and in turn wonders why they’re bothering. It’s like I imagine Sheryl Crow probably sounds. Maybe it’s her, I don’t know. And that passage with the bit about a spare half million is sung in a really irritating manner.

7 – this past me by, I’m afraid. A bit MOR.

8 – I like this one a bit more. Really compressed sound, which makes for a slightly claustrophobic atmosphere. I like that guitar with the volume swells, and I’m a sucker for shaker in all contexts. This is a pretty cute track. Nothing I’d want to explore much further, but it’s got a good arrangement. Where those low horns join in, the cowbell (I think), lots of nice textures and movement. Sounds like the band Wings could have been ;-)

9 – As 7, sorry. No interest in this at all.

10 – This sounds more like the band Wings avoided being. I’m struggling to listen to this, in fact. So saccharine.

11 – Another one I dislike. So much production, but with no real substance. There’s nothing I can connect with on this. It sounds like MTV music (not that I’ve seen MTV in a couple of decades, so that may be very wide of the mark).

12 – vaguely psychedelic pop. What’s happened to the bass? I can barely even detect it. Why put it that low in the mix? The drums are very Flaming Lips and I like the major-to-minor switch that comes in every now and then, very beatles. Otherwise it just sounds unfinished to me.

13 – funky piece, very Curtis Mayfield/Don Hathaway sort of arrangement – especially the strings. I wouldn’t be surprised if this was on Curtom. Lovely atmosphere, and spectacularly good drums. Those hats are tight and delicate as hell. And that wah-wah guitar that takes it home is great. A very good record, despite being an unremarkable song.

14 – I hate this. I literally couldn’t stand a second of it. I hate every sound on there, I hate the song, I hate the production, I hate the whole thing.


Lots that didn’t do much for me, then, but always good to hear something different, and I really liked number four. Thanks though, and sorry to sound a bit negative.

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T. Willy Rye
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby T. Willy Rye » 21 Aug 2015, 00:31

1 – this sounds like a Dodgy b-side. And I say that from the position of liking Dodgy. It’s a reasonable mature piece of pop, but the bass irritates me. If this had some nice melodic electric bass, that would finish it off nicely.

This is Father John Misty with The Ideal Husband. I guess I hear what you mean about the bass. It's put pretty toward the front in the mix and maybe it lags a little? This is fairly positive response so I will proceed.

2 – I like the Mariachi horns on this, and the electric guitars sounds great. Some top ride work there too, solid but neat. The song is fine, but the sound of the whole thing is what makes it. I don’t mind her singing either, pretty sultry.

Eilen Jewell with Rio Grande. I think her band deserves more credit.

3 – Lovely resonator on here. Good to hear the washboard too. And delicious bass, to boot. This is fun, and pleasant. The singing doesn’t do much for me, although it’s fine. Likewise the song feels a little lightweight, but as a vehicle for that playing, it’s more than justified.

This is a Bay Are group called HowellDevine. They play a lot of old blues standards by the likes of Sonny Boy Williamson and Jimmy Reed. Thought I'd put in one of their originals here, maybe why you referred to it as “lightweight,” but the band members are pretty accomplished. I disagree with you about the vocals, Joshua Howell's singing reminds me some of Mark Sandman from Morphine.

4 – more sumptuous sounds. Love the beater on the toms, tasty, chunky electrics, warm bass and a delicate banjo. These guys know what they’re doing. I like this. I’d like to see them live, for sure. Lots of people make this kind of sound intentionally and deliberately, including the previous track, and that’s all fine, but these sound like the sound is just what naturally comes out when they play. They also sound a bit like how Siouxsie & the Banshees would have sounded had they come from Mississippi.

Ain't it Hard by Banditos
Actually from Alabama. To me they sound like if Janis Joplin fronted Lynard Skynard and somehow started making more palatable music. Saw them in San Francisco only about 25 people showed up-- no matter they were fantastic.


5 – less interest in this. It’s a good example of the style, but it’s a bit too polished for me, and maybe takes itself a bit more seriously than I do. It’s not quite bombastic but it’s on that train. Over produced for my tastes.

Lord Huron with Love Like Ghosts

6 – another that does little for me. Well produced, but sounds pretty generic as a result. I can’t bring myself to pay attention to the story, my mind wanders, and in turn wonders why they’re bothering. It’s like I imagine Sheryl Crow probably sounds. Maybe it’s her, I don’t know. And that passage with the bit about a spare half million is sung in a really irritating manner.

Sheryl Crow... hmm. Never liked her much.This is Courtney Barnett with Depreston.

7 – this past me by, I’m afraid. A bit MOR.

I wish all MOR had Nels Cline playing those crunchy riffs and Wilco's rhythm section.


8 – I like this one a bit more. Really compressed sound, which makes for a slightly claustrophobic atmosphere. I like that guitar with the volume swells, and I’m a sucker for shaker in all contexts. This is a pretty cute track. Nothing I’d want to explore much further, but it’s got a good arrangement. Where those low horns join in, the cowbell (I think), lots of nice textures and movement. Sounds like the band Wings could have been

I don't think Wings could have ever gotten here. Maybe if Jeff Lynne had chosen to team up with Prince. This is Bop English with Trying and I really think you should pursue further, but given your reaction to this mix in general, I don't expect you to take much stock in my opinion.

9 – As 7, sorry. No interest in this at all.

Another tack that I think has some Jeff Lynne lurking around in the back there.

10 – This sounds more like the band Wings avoided being. I’m struggling to listen to this, in fact. So saccharine.

Classic Hall and Oates.

11 – Another one I dislike. So much production, but with no real substance. There’s nothing I can connect with on this. It sounds like MTV music (not that I’ve seen MTV in a couple of decades, so that may be very wide of the mark).

I wish MTV played Afghan Whigs. I'm genuinely sorry for you that you can't connect with this. The Afghan Whigs' merging of grunge and 70s soul has brought so much satisfaction to me over the last 25 years.

12 – vaguely psychedelic pop. What’s happened to the bass? I can barely even detect it. Why put it that low in the mix? The drums are very Flaming Lips and I like the major-to-minor switch that comes in every now and then, very beatles. Otherwise it just sounds unfinished to me.

Definitely has a lo fi indie quality that I have to say I've always been okay with, particularly when coupled with King Tuff's charm.

13 – funky piece, very Curtis Mayfield/Don Hathaway sort of arrangement – especially the strings. I wouldn’t be surprised if this was on Curtom. Lovely atmosphere, and spectacularly good drums. Those hats are tight and delicate as hell. And that wah-wah guitar that takes it home is great. A very good record, despite being an unremarkable song.

This is Nicole Willis and the Soul Investigators.

14 – I hate this. I literally couldn’t stand a second of it. I hate every sound on there, I hate the song, I hate the production, I hate the whole thing.

I guess there's no room for any ambiguity here. Tame Impala with I'm a Man


Lots that didn’t do much for me, then, but always good to hear something different, and I really liked number four. Thanks though, and sorry to sound a bit negative.

A bit, wow! I suppose I should have spent a little more time on your tastes, but I thought there was a lot of good newer music out and except for Hall and Oates that was my focus. Talk about a misstep.

Not that you care, but here is a track listing:


1. The Ideal Husband- Father John Misty
2. Rio Grande- Eilen Jewell
3. Let You Go- HowellDevine
4. Ain't It Hard- The Banditos
5. Love Like Ghost- Lord Huron
6. Depreston- Courtney Barnett
7. The Joke Explained- Wilco
8. Trying- Bop English
9. Say- Mikal Cronin
10. Sara Smile- Hall and Oates
11. Matamoros- Afghan Whigs
12. Eye of the Muse- King Tuff
13. Light Years Ahead- Nicole Willis and the Soul Investigators
14. Cause I'm a Man- Tame Impala

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bhoywonder
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby bhoywonder » 21 Aug 2015, 08:03

Thanks bub. I enjoyed listening to it, even if i didn't find much to like. If you know what I mean. You have to try something new otherwise you'll just stick with what you know already. That's part of the adventure.

Some interesting things in that reveal – not least that that the one I really couldn't stand was Tame Impala! I love their second album and really like teh first. I'd heard the new one had upset a few folks and was intrigued. I guess i won't investigate further. Afghan Whigs I've never liked – it's that mix of grunge and soul that I can't get on with! And anything that sound like Jeff Lynne's been near it almost always makes me run for the door! But I'll definitely be checking out the Banditos and Nicole Willis and the Soul Investigators.

Thanks! I'll send you one you'll hate in return :D

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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby T. Willy Rye » 23 Aug 2015, 02:01

This mix has a very 70s FM Rock radio vibe about it. I find that I like this sort of thing more in moderation. But here goes...

1. This has a big fat riff that I like, but the repetition and vocals make it pretty clunky until the change comes in with “I do care for you.” which I also like, but not enough to completely redeem the song. Maybe a push.

2. This song's a little more dynamic with some big rawk guitar in it, but again I don't like the vocals. It's muscle car driving music. I drive a Prius.

3. The song, Gun Show at the Church? is also made in a sort of 70s rock (though more Southern) vein, but given it's sarcasm, I'm sure it's later. I wish it was funnier or more raucous or just better.

4. This is a little better. Definitely influenced by that hard rock 70s sound that verged on metal. The bass is making me think of Zeppelin, but that is definitely not Robert Plant.

5. This is some kind of power battle. I can't really abide this. Sorry.

6. This one is more fun, if not very original. Reminds me of those bands like Jet who tried a retro sound but didn't stick around long. Done better by AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, and even the White Stripes. Still enjoyable.

7. I really like this one. Maybe a little like the Cold War Kids with a less annoying singer and better guitarist. It's more a product of many influences, rather than aping a couple. Looking forward to the reveal on this one.

8. This is pretty heavy. Does it constitute Stoner Rock? This is what I imagine when I hear that term, sort of a slowed down Soundgarden. Probably won't go back to this often, but it's not bad. The singer sounds a lot like Chris Cornell.

9. The beginning sounded like Anarchy in the UK and then those guitars come in. This has more of a late60s British psych/garage sound. After #7 probably my second favorite track.

10. Joker and the Thief by Wolfmother. Their nod to the 70s sounded so fresh when it came out. Definitely a sound that was pretty limiting and I haven't heard anything from them so I don't think they could maintain that initial excitement. It still sounds pretty good-- haven't heard it for a while.

11. Sounds like 90s Iggy Pop fronting a feckless Rage Against the Machine. I don't like this.

12. I like the bass on this along with the little guitar fills, but again the vocals are really sub par. If the lead singer from Canned Heat had a bastard child with David Lee Roth? How hard is it to find someone who can actually sing?

13. This bouncy little number is sung by a vocalists better than the ones in the previous two tracks which- let's be honest- is no great shakes. I'm okay with this one.

14. Is pretty good, a little too earnest, nostalgic, sentimental for me. I'm Easy for white people. Plays in the end scene of a mid 80s rom com where Tom Berenger and Mary Kay Place decide to work through their problems and the viewer is left with a little bit of hope. Ohh and it's live.

Sorry, I sound like a dick and so soon after bhoy had completely destroyed my list. I appreciate your efforts, but most of this mix was not for me.

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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby whodathunkit » 24 Aug 2015, 15:27

Had this for a while. Quite a few of the performers on this mix are probably still alive which is always hard work for me :D . 3 or 4 listens later, here we go.

1. A really jolly start. Strummy, folky, almost skiffle-ish tune with catchy chorus. The first of many tracks on here with Scots-sounding vocals pitched just a little too far back in the mix for me. Nice though.
2. This one's called "Waterfall". (cock-up on the tagging removal front :D ).Acoustic ballad. Dreary but short.
3. Same sort of thing but helped enormously by CSN-type harmonies and a some wheezy harmonica.
4. Buck Owens. Not the strongest song but the pedal steel could blow the top of your head off. Great stuff.
5. Big production, big acoustic strumming and big female vocals. Reminded me of the dreaded 4 Non Blondes. Unfortunately it's also irritatingly catchy.
6. Lovely folky/country ballad. Pretty sure it's John Stewart and I really must get some more of his stuff. A highlight.
7. Slow, stately dirge which would have been charming at 3 minutes but by 7 minutes i'd had more than enough.
8. A Chuck Berry song about cars that I'd never heard before. A discovery and a treat.
9. Another pleasant acoustic ballad. It just came and went I'm afraid.
10. And another but this one's back in John Stewart territory. A beautiful tune beautifully played. Can't say better.
11. A rude awakening with a tasty bit of bluebeat. Sounding great on a wet Monday afternoon.
12. This one really grew on me. Six minutes long but not a second wasted. Slow buiding anthemic song about I know not what with a lovely spare arrangement throwing in the kitchen sink only when necessary. A cracker.
13. There are many around here would hate this schmaltzy soft-rock concoction. I aint one of them. Excellent.
14. Jump blues. Might be Joe Turner. Might not. It's great though.
15. This is the sort of record that old rockers make with their old mates long after their halcyon days just to show they're still around. A shuffle beat not to put too much strain on the hips and lyrical platitudes like "Go out and get it while you can", etc. I'm guessing Andy Fairwather Low. I enjoyed it but I know it's rubbish :oops: .
16. Something cool and African. Terrific horns and unlike a lot of this stuff it doesn't outstay it's welcome.
17. A nice closer with swirly organ and sad little boy vocals (again too far back).

Didn't recognise a single thing on this. Plenty to enjoy and find out more about. Cheers
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby The Fish » 26 Aug 2015, 08:45

Mix from Bhoywonder which lived up to expectations. It wouldn't be a Bhoy mix without at least something I could do a hatchet job on,but in fairness I have to say that the stand out tracks were very good indeed.

1. The band seem to be making as much of a racket as they can to disguise the fact that the song itself is quite boring. All frantic drums and guitar, but ultimately something and nothing.
2. This is not much better. Trippy hippy Lennonesque vocals over an overproduced backing with some horrible muddy thudding drums. Unkike the firsttrack though there is a half decent song in here somewhere trying to get out.
3. But this is more like it. I love Mariachi El Bronx and if this isn’t them it sounds just like them.
4. This was great for about a minute. Strong vocal over a simple subdued backing. Reminded me of Terry Reid’s Rich Kid Blues. Unfortunately it then descended into a horrible metal jam of the worst kind
5. Bob, although here he sounds like the smelly old tramp that rogered Lianne ITV senseless (God that thread still makes me laugh). Actually I’m a real sucker for this kind of maudlin drunken balladry in the style of Tom Waits and Shane MacGowan.
6. Some good playing here, especially the guitar. The vocalist for the most part is fine. Unfortunately the song itself is a very ordinary blues by numbers, and she is definitely out of her comfort zone when straying into “blues mama” territory.
7. This could have been a perfectly serviceable (at least) version of When Will I See You Again. Unfortunately, even though I have a higher tolerance than most for cod reggae, that plinky plink chakka chakka riff when it’s as relentless as this turns into Chinese water torture after about 20 seconds.
8. So just when it seemed that this review was starting to look like “T Willy Rye’s revenge” the good stuff comes along and I liked pretty much everything from here on in. Starting with Jackie Wilson and Rags To Riches. Sublime.
9. It would be easy to dismiss stuff like this as anodyne when compared to the dirtier end of the rock and roll spectrum, but it is still paints a wonderful picture of more innocent times. You’d need to be a joyless bastard not to lap this up.
10. A bit of fiddle yee hah, unusually with electric guitar rather than banjo or mandolin. A good guitarist too. Fine picking style.
11. A heavy heady mix of blues and soul but transcending either genre, like the bastard son of Hendrix, with a dollop of Shuggie Otis style psych thrown in. Terrific.
12. Recorded in a retro Harry Smith/Alan Lomax style, but has to be more recent as it’s a Laura Nyro song. It actually works quite well in this arrangement
13. This is miserable as fuck. Thankfully I love miserable as fuck. That folk violin drone sound can be a bit much at times, but is the perfect accompaniment here, particularly as the song doesn’t outstay its welcome. Rather lovely.
14. I like this and I’m sure I recognize the voice here, Lambchop ?
15. Classic Nina
16. I love that Flaming Lips/My Morning Jacket kind of sound. This is great
17. A bit of Spanish guitar style noodling. Simple but rather engaging.
18. You gotta love Wilie. He might not often make you go Wow how great is this, but there’s always a real honesty to everything he does. One of the good guys.

Thanks mate.
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby The Fish » 26 Aug 2015, 09:43

whodathunkit wrote:Had this for a while. Quite a few of the performers on this mix are probably still alive which is always hard work for me :D . 3 or 4 listens later, here we go.

This was mine Bob. Apologies for the lack of stiffs. I'll try harder next time

1. A really jolly start. Strummy, folky, almost skiffle-ish tune with catchy chorus. The first of many tracks on here with Scots-sounding vocals pitched just a little too far back in the mix for me. Nice though.

My CD listening/buying tends to be cyclical and I'm usually on a kick of something or other at any given time. Recently I've been into the NZ Flying Nun stuff, which was probably a mistake as much of it is OOP and silly money. This is The Bats from their first album Daddy's Highway. Anyone investigating further and dismayed at the price this fetches fear not. The Bats Volume 1 has the first two albums plus a third album of all their EPs all with extras. Three albums for around twenty quid. Recommended.

2. This one's called "Waterfall". (cock-up on the tagging removal front :D ).Acoustic ballad. Dreary but short.

I probably put this in just so I could crack the joke about this being a subliminal hint to all Mix clubbers to MIX OFTLY as this is indeed , er Mick Softley :oops:

3. Same sort of thing but helped enormously by CSN-type harmonies and a some wheezy harmonica.

The underrated Marmalade from a double CD of their complete Decca recordings (so post dating Ob La Di but including Reflections of My Life and Cousin Norman)

4. Buck Owens. Not the strongest song but the pedal steel could blow the top of your head off. Great stuff.

Well exactly. I had this already ripped so more or less picked a track at random

5. Big production, big acoustic strumming and big female vocals. Reminded me of the dreaded 4 Non Blondes. Unfortunately it's also irritatingly catchy.

Well I knew you liked The Mummers but didn't know if you were familiar with the Raissa solo albums before she joined the band.

6. Lovely folky/country ballad. Pretty sure it's John Stewart and I really must get some more of his stuff. A highlight.

Indeed the late great John Stewart

7. Slow, stately dirge which would have been charming at 3 minutes but by 7 minutes i'd had more than enough.

Funnily enough I'd have to agree. I burned the mix to CD and played it through a few times and every time this track came on I thought wow this is great. I love that almost hymnal feel to it, but yes it does alas outstay its welcome. Denny Gerrard, one half of 60s one hit wonders Warm SOunds

8. A Chuck Berry song about cars that I'd never heard before. A discovery and a treat.

From playing the mix through I did tweak it at the last minute and throw a couple of "bankers" in there. This being one. As you say there are loads of well known Chuck songs but you can virtually stick a pin in anywhere else and find something worthwhile.

9. Another pleasant acoustic ballad. It just came and went I'm afraid.

Rain Parade

10. And another but this one's back in John Stewart territory. A beautiful tune beautifully played. Can't say better.

This is kind of ten a penny territory with the rate Nashville is chucking out "guy with a guitar" albums, but this guy is one of the best I've heard and definitley rises above the crowd, Andrew Combs.

11. A rude awakening with a tasty bit of bluebeat. Sounding great on a wet Monday afternoon.

The second last minute tweak banker. Scanned the shelves and came across the Proper label ska set hwich I hadn't played in a while. This is Justin Hinds

12. This one really grew on me. Six minutes long but not a second wasted. Slow buiding anthemic song about I know not what with a lovely spare arrangement throwing in the kitchen sink only when necessary. A cracker.

I was vaguely aware of this band and took a punt on their latest album as a makeweight in a two for £15 Amazon deal and was so impressed I went back for their first two. Admiral Fallow. They remind me a little of one of my other favourote underrated bands Cherry Ghost

13. There are many around here would hate this schmaltzy soft-rock concoction. I aint one of them. Excellent.

And many around here would of course be wrong. This is actually a latter Mamas and Papas track

14. Jump blues. Might be Joe Turner. Might not. It's great though.

I recently bought the two Cosimo Matassa story sets and the tracks by this guy all leapt out at me. So much so that I went and bought his Bear Family set. Smiley Lewis. I love all that jump blues/blues shoter stuff anyway so throw a bit of N'Awlins vibe in the mix and it's win/win

15. This is the sort of record that old rockers make with their old mates long after their halcyon days just to show they're still around. A shuffle beat not to put too much strain on the hips and lyrical platitudes like "Go out and get it while you can", etc. I'm guessing Andy Fairwather Low. I enjoyed it but I know it's rubbish :oops: .

I'd say honest and unpretentious rather than rubbish :D but I take your point. This always has me jumping around with a smile on my face and yes it is AFL

16. Something cool and African. Terrific horns and unlike a lot of this stuff it doesn't outstay it's welcome.

It;s actually Brazilian ! This guy Tim Maia was quite a big name in the early days and something of a one off - Brazilian psychedelic disco if you will. Mostly OOP this is from a compilation in the World psychedelic series that also includes Os Mutantes and William Onyeabor

17. A nice closer with swirly organ and sad little boy vocals (again too far back).

And coing full circle it's baqck to New Zealand/ This time the ABle Tasmans

Didn't recognise a single thing on this. Plenty to enjoy and find out more about. Cheers

Thanks for listening Bob. It's always a pleasure to mix for you. Our tastes overlap to a fair extent and if I ever miss the mark it's usually because I try not to play it too safe

1. The Bats - Take It
2. Mick Softley - Waterfall
3. Marmalade - The Ballad of Cherry Flavour
4. Buck Owens - Fool Me Again
5. Raissa - Believer
6. John Stewart - The Eyes of Sweet Virginia
7. Denny Gerrard - True Believer
8. Chuck Berry - Dear Dad
9. Rain Parade - Only Business
10. Andrew Combs - Nothing To Lose
11. Justin Hinds - Over The River
12. Admiral Fallow - Tree Bursts
13. The Mamas And Papas - Step On
14. Smiley Lewis - Hook Line And SInker
15. Andy Fairweather Low - Dance On
16. Tim Maia - Que Beleza
17. Able Tasmans - Mary Tyler Moore


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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby whodathunkit » 26 Aug 2015, 17:42

Cheers Paul. "Didn't recognise anything" :oops: Turns out I own the both the Mick Softley and the Denny Gerrard! And missing the M+Ps track should be a red card offence. Great stuff though. Thanks as always.
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby TG » 03 Sep 2015, 14:33

Here's my better late than never review. I took a liberty that I hope was correct. When the tracks were renumbered track 10 was the first track. Since there was nothing between 9 & 11 I assumed that the first track was supposed to be there and so moved it. Hopefully it didn't mess things up.

1) The Gollowogs - Fight Fire. My favorite track by these guys. They were a pretty darn good Garage band but really turned up their creative juices a couple of years later.

2) Some reverb & echo laden rockabilly. Sounds a little too simple to be from the Sun Studios. Not sure who it is (Gene Vincent?) but it's standard rockabilly and works just fine.

3) Someone heard early Howling' Wolf and decided they could do that too. It's good but can't hold a candle to the guy he's trying to imitate.

4) This one is an Olympics or Coasters style R&B vocal group. The song is based around the Little Latin Lupe Lu changes. There is nothing original about this track but it works just fine. Curious about the reveal here.

5) An organ and sax heavy instro. Add in some interesting guitar and you have a really simple and derivative track that, like the last one, works just fine despite its limitations.

6) This guy has one annoying Next Door Neighbor. A pretty funny blues track about a chronic borrower next door. Simple, funny and bluesy and pretty fine. I know the voice but can't place it.

7) A gospel track in the church tradition. I'm not a fan of this style gospel. The sentiment doesn't exactly work for me either.

8) Old country style blues. One guy, one guitar and a woman who ain't treating him right. And that's nobody's business but his own. Fine guitar picking here. I'm going to take a stab and guess it's Mississippi John Hurt.

9) It's Summertime and the living is easy.This has to be Billie Holliday. I don't own much by her (assuming I'm right about who this is) because I never think I'll listen to it much but then I hear something like this and realize I'm probably missing out.

10) This is so familiar to me. A soul record from the 70s and I recognize the voice but can't place it. This could have been a hit in the mold of Dobie Gray or Billy Preston. It's a good track and I suspect i might actually own it. This one has me curious.

11) Starts out like Walk On The Wild Side with the sliding upright bass but quickly moves into jazz territory. Hell of a tone from the trumpet player. This has an almost ambient feel to it. I really like this a lot.

12) Some kinda cool 60s/70s pop. Apparently he's "...looking at the future forever". I like this and, once again, recognize the singer. Has a kind of a George Harrison solo feel to it. This is good.

13) Slide guitar and finger picking that makes me wonder, after playing guitar for more than 30 years, why I bother. Some folks can just play. Some of those folks (bastards?) made this record. Fine playing, slight song, lots o' fun.

14) African music that I know nothing of. The only thing I own that is similar to this is King Sunny Ade. This has less guitar soloing and more picked acoustic that KSA but works just fine. Another that has me curious about the reveal.

15) British folk with some fine playing but the vocals kind of bug me. The music from this has been nagging me throughout my listening to this mix. It puts me in mind of something that I only just figured out was the Lovin' Spoonful. But to be fair they used it twice.





16) It seems like every 2 or 3 mixes I get a Mike Nesmith solo track. And with the exception of a couple of tracks they just don't work for me. His solo work mostly seems overly slick, overly produced and under motivated. It's not particularly bad or particularly bad. It just sort of sits there. Not my thing.

Again, apologies for the late review. I've been getting ready for a big day and it's taking up all of my time. By the time of the next Mix Club I'll be a married man!!! Just a few days away now.
Jeff K wrote:Not at all. I love TG. I might be the only one on BCB who does but I don't care.

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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby bhoywonder » 04 Sep 2015, 12:28

The Fish wrote:Mix from Bhoywonder which lived up to expectations. It wouldn't be a Bhoy mix without at least something I could do a hatchet job on,but in fairness I have to say that the stand out tracks were very good indeed.

I thought I’d try you with some newish bits I thought you’d maybe not like all of, as well as some things I was pretty confident on.

The Fish wrote:1. The band seem to be making as much of a racket as they can to disguise the fact that the song itself is quite boring. All frantic drums and guitar, but ultimately something and nothing.

Making as much of a racket as you can is a pretty good thing in my eyes! These are San Francisco psych-rockers Thee Oh Sees. I like the way they sound.

The Fish wrote:2. This is not much better. Trippy hippy Lennonesque vocals over an overproduced backing with some horrible muddy thudding drums. Unkike the firsttrack though there is a half decent song in here somewhere trying to get out.

This one grew and grew on me until I couldn’t get it out of my head for about a month. Australia’s Tame Impala (see above for more) with a piece psychedelic pop (with gorgeous-sounding drums) called Feels Like We Only Go Backwards from their superb 2011 Lonerism album. Stick with it.

The Fish wrote:3. But this is more like it. I love Mariachi El Bronx and if this isn’t them it sounds just like them.

It is, with the fabulous Revolution Girl from their second album. Jumper K introduced me to their pleasures, and I had a great time with him seeing them in a small club in Cardiff.

The Fish wrote:4. This was great for about a minute. Strong vocal over a simple subdued backing. Reminded me of Terry Reid’s Rich Kid Blues. Unfortunately it then descended into a horrible metal jam of the worst kind

Metal jam?! Ha! You silly old fool ;-) This is the sensational Cursed Diamond by the Black Crowes. It’s a towering performance, an incredible arrangement, stunning musicianship and a brilliant song. It builds to a climax, it soars, then it crashes. It has tenderness, glory, power, anxiety and passion. Metal jam? Oh dear, Paul ;-)

The Fish wrote:5. Bob, although here he sounds like the smelly old tramp that rogered Lianne ITV senseless (God that thread still makes me laugh). Actually I’m a real sucker for this kind of maudlin drunken balladry in the style of Tom Waits and Shane MacGowan.

I’m not sure I follow the Lianne ITV reference, but yes, it’s Bob, and yes, it is rather good, isn’t it? It’s from this year’s Shadows in the Night album of Sinatra covers, all performed live with no overdubs. A great late night whisky record.

The Fish wrote:6. Some good playing here, especially the guitar. The vocalist for the most part is fine. Unfortunately the song itself is a very ordinary blues by numbers, and she is definitely out of her comfort zone when straying into “blues mama” territory.

It was the playing that appealed to me too, and what I thought you might like. The song and vocal are average, as you saying, but the playing is worth putting up with that for, I think. It’s Susan Tedeschi with Just Won’t Burn.

The Fish wrote:7. This could have been a perfectly serviceable (at least) version of When Will I See You Again. Unfortunately, even though I have a higher tolerance than most for cod reggae, that plinky plink chakka chakka riff when it’s as relentless as this turns into Chinese water torture after about 20 seconds.

Ha! I’m not sure Marcia Griffiths has ever been called ‘cod reggae’ before. Studio One’s Marcia Griffiths, the Queen of Reggae. Have a word with yourself.

The Fish wrote:8. So just when it seemed that this review was starting to look like “T Willy Rye’s revenge” the good stuff comes along and I liked pretty much everything from here on in. Starting with Jackie Wilson and Rags To Riches. Sublime.

Billy Ward and His Dominoes, what a group! Didn’t Jackie replace Clyde McPhatter? That’s got to be pone of the best subs in music history, hasn’t it?

The Fish wrote:9. It would be easy to dismiss stuff like this as anodyne when compared to the dirtier end of the rock and roll spectrum, but it is still paints a wonderful picture of more innocent times. You’d need to be a joyless bastard not to lap this up.

I think doowop is may be my favourite type of pop music. I’ve loved this stuff since I was about 7 years old and it makes me feel like a kid today. It’s perfect, I think, and everything since has been trying to improve on it. This is the Timetones with In My Heart, released on Times Square Records in 19 and 61.

The Fish wrote:10. A bit of fiddle yee hah, unusually with electric guitar rather than banjo or mandolin. A good guitarist too. Fine picking style.

Neat, isn’t it? Hank Garland with the Sugarfoot Rag. You may know Hank from playing with Johnny Cash, Elvis, Patsy Cline, etc. Sugarfoot Rag was a million-seller in 1949. Jerry Reed also had a minor hit with it in the late 70s.

The Fish wrote:11. A heavy heady mix of blues and soul but transcending either genre, like the bastard son of Hendrix, with a dollop of Shuggie Otis style psych thrown in. Terrific.

Believe it or not, this is Muddy Waters, from Electric Mud, which he made in 1968 with Rotary Connection. The song is called Tom Cat. Interesting, isn’t it? If a little bizarre.

The Fish wrote:12. Recorded in a retro Harry Smith/Alan Lomax style, but has to be more recent as it’s a Laura Nyro song. It actually works quite well in this arrangement

Watermelon Slim And The Workers are probably one of the best current blues bands. I saw them play in Memphis and interviewed Watermelon Slim, who was resplendent in a lime green zoot suit, with matching lime green fedora, and alligator-skin boots. I felt somewhat underdressed in jeans, trainers and tshirt. This is his version of And When I Die and it’s from their 2008 album No Paid Holidays.

The Fish wrote:13. This is miserable as fuck. Thankfully I love miserable as fuck. That folk violin drone sound can be a bit much at times, but is the perfect accompaniment here, particularly as the song doesn’t outstay its welcome. Rather lovely.

I’m really glad you like this. It’s by this great young(ish) Irish singer-songwriter called Seamus Fogarty. I’ve been lucky enough to play on the same bill as him on a few gigs and at a couple of festivals, and grew to absolutely love his music (as well as his company as a drinking buddy). This is the title track from his debut album God Damn You Mountain, which is available on Lost Map records. He has a new EP just out now, which is amazing, I think, and a new album due soon. He’s on tour. Go see him and you’ll love it. He’s playing a free festival in London next weekend. http://seamusfogarty.com/


The Fish wrote:14. I like this and I’m sure I recognize the voice here, Lambchop ?

Yeah, Lambchop, to keep the cheer up! This is The Gettysburg Address from the Decline Of The Country & Western Civilization. An amazing band, really, even if not one I can play often. The music comes from very deep inside.


The Fish wrote:15. Classic Nina

From probably my all-time favourite live album, 1974’s It Is Finished, this is a gorgeous version of I Want a Little Sugar in My Bowl.

The Fish wrote:16. I love that Flaming Lips/My Morning Jacket kind of sound. This is great

Another I’m glad you liked. And you’re right – it is great. This is Bon Iver, with Re: Stacks from his/their amazing 2007 debut For Emma, Forever Ago. This album is one of my favourites ever, and one of the shows I saw from them was as good as any band I’ve seen in the last 20 years. Get the album, Paul. If you like this then you’re going to really enjoy it, I’m sure. I thought you would. The second album is also great.

The Fish wrote:17. A bit of Spanish guitar style noodling. Simple but rather engaging.

Ha – I tricked you into enjoying something from Paul McCartney. Sort of. This is from his 1966 soundtrack to the Boulting Brothers film the Family Way, which is a lovely wee movie, but a really overlooked soundtracked.

The Fish wrote:18. You gotta love Wilie. He might not often make you go Wow how great is this, but there’s always a real honesty to everything he does. One of the good guys.

I saw him about 15 years ago and was amazed by him. His voice has such authority, such tenacity and real integrity. One of the good guys indeed. This is He Was A Friend Of Mine from the Brokeback Mountain soundtrack. I’ve not seen the film, but the record’s good.

The Fish wrote:Thanks mate.

You’re most welcome, I’m gladyou enjoyed chunks of it, and don’t mind you hating some other stuff. That’s part of it, right? Hope you get to check out more from Seamus and Bon Iver. And if you see Seamus, do tell him bhoywonder sent you!

1. Putrifiers II - Thee Oh Sees
2. Feels Like We Only Go Backwards - Tame Impala
3. Revolution Girls - Mariachi El Bronx
4. Cursed Diamond - The Black Crowes
5. What'll I Do - Bob Dylan
6. Just Won't Burn - Susan Tedeschi
7. When Will I See You Again - Marcia Griffiths
8. Rags To Riches - Billy Ward & His Dominoes
9. In My Heart - The Timetones
10. Sugarfoot Rag - Hank Garland
11. Tom Cat - Muddy Waters
12. And When I Die - Watermelon Slim And The Workers
13. God Damn You Mountain - Seamus Fogarty
14. The Gettysburg Address - Lambchop
15. I Want a Little Sugar in My Bowl - Nina Simone
16. Re: Stacks - Bon Iver
17. Variation Concertantes Opus 1 - IV - The Claudel String Quartet
18. He Was A Friend Of Mine - Willie Nelson

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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby The Fish » 04 Sep 2015, 14:41

Thanks mate. I actually own those Bon Iver albums :D We'll have to agree to disagree on The Black Crowes. I have a Billy Ward comp as well somewhere. That does sound hell of a lot like Jackie Wilson. My bad as they say. Muddy Waters makes perfect sense. Not sure why I don't have Electric Mud. Still easily remedied.

As for Lianne ITV, you must have read the Barry White documentary thread http://www.bcb-board.co.uk/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1817
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby whodathunkit » 04 Sep 2015, 15:08

TG wrote:Here's my better late than never review. I took a liberty that I hope was correct. When the tracks were renumbered track 10 was the first track. Since there was nothing between 9 & 11 I assumed that the first track was supposed to be there and so moved it. Hopefully it didn't mess things up.


A correct assumption Tom. Dunno what happened there. Anyway......

1) The Gollowogs - Fight Fire. My favorite track by these guys. They were a pretty darn good Garage band but really turned up their creative juices a couple of years later.

Yep. Classic track, "unfortunate" band name. Still, as you say, a harbinger of great things to come.

2) Some reverb & echo laden rockabilly. Sounds a little too simple to be from the Sun Studios. Not sure who it is (Gene Vincent?) but it's standard rockabilly and works just fine.

Great rock'n'roll albums that are anything more than just a collection of singles are few and far between. In fact this is the only one I know. "All By Myself" from the Johnny Burnette trio's 1957 debut.

3) Someone heard early Howling' Wolf and decided they could do that too. It's good but can't hold a candle to the guy he's trying to imitate.

Well, I reckon he out-howls HW (with a bit of help from an echo chamber).Kid Thomas and "The Wolf Pack".

4) This one is an Olympics or Coasters style R&B vocal group. The song is based around the Little Latin Lupe Lu changes. There is nothing original about this track but it works just fine. Curious about the reveal here.

A little more grit in this than a lot of doo-wop. The Electras from 1962 and ""Boo Babe"

5) An organ and sax heavy instro. Add in some interesting guitar and you have a really simple and derivative track that, like the last one, works just fine despite its limitations.

Standard issue but right on the money I think. Willie Mitchell from his performing days and "Percolatin'"(1964)

6) This guy has one annoying Next Door Neighbor. A pretty funny blues track about a chronic borrower next door. Simple, funny and bluesy and pretty fine. I know the voice but can't place it.

From an Excello anthology, Jerry McCain and "My Next Door Neighbour". We've all been there :D .

7) A gospel track in the church tradition. I'm not a fan of this style gospel. The sentiment doesn't exactly work for me either.

The Soul Stirrers, post-Sam Cooke, and "Something's Got A Hold On Me"

8) Old country style blues. One guy, one guitar and a woman who ain't treating him right. And that's nobody's business but his own. Fine guitar picking here. I'm going to take a stab and guess it's Mississippi John Hurt.

Mr Hurt indeed, "Nobody's Business"

9) It's Summertime and the living is easy.This has to be Billie Holliday. I don't own much by her (assuming I'm right about who this is) because I never think I'll listen to it much but then I hear something like this and realize I'm probably missing out.

See, here's the thing about BH. Too much attention is paid to the tragic, heroin-raddled, voice-shot-to-shit Billie of the 50s and nowhere near enough to the joyous. life-affirming recordings of the 30s/40s.Great playing by the Teddy Wilson band too.Then again, there are thousands of versions of "Summertime" and I don't think I've heard a bad one yet.

10) This is so familiar to me. A soul record from the 70s and I recognize the voice but can't place it. This could have been a hit in the mold of Dobie Gray or Billy Preston. It's a good track and I suspect i might actually own it. This one has me curious.

Benny Johnson from his (I think only) albom Visions of Paradise(1973).

11) Starts out like Walk On The Wild Side with the sliding upright bass but quickly moves into jazz territory. Hell of a tone from the trumpet player. This has an almost ambient feel to it. I really like this a lot.

The only modern day jazzer I have any acquaintance with.Christian Scott and "The Red Rooster" From The Christian Scott Collection which is a pretty good starting point.Then I'd move on to Yesterday You Said Tomorrow

12) Some kinda cool 60s/70s pop. Apparently he's "...looking at the future forever". I like this and, once again, recognize the singer. Has a kind of a George Harrison solo feel to it. This is good.

Finally something recent (lat year in fact). Although the bloke was 70 when he made it and died a few months later :( . The great Jack Bruce and "Fields of Forever" from his swan song album Silver Rails which was better than it had any right to be.

13) Slide guitar and finger picking that makes me wonder, after playing guitar for more than 30 years, why I bother. Some folks can just play. Some of those folks (bastards?) made this record. Fine playing, slight song, lots o' fun.

Leo Kottke is often accused of being all flash and no substance but when you're this flash, who cares? "Lost John".

14) African music that I know nothing of. The only thing I own that is similar to this is King Sunny Ade. This has less guitar soloing and more picked acoustic that KSA but works just fine. Another that has me curious about the reveal.

I also know sod all about African music but I do like this feller.SE Rogie from Sierra Leone. He'd been around since the 60s but was "re-discovered" in the early 90s and made one last album, the wonderfully-titled Dead Men Don't Smoke Marijuana. This track's "Morning, Noon and Night"

15) British folk with some fine playing but the vocals kind of bug me. The music from this has been nagging me throughout my listening to this mix. It puts me in mind of something that I only just figured out was the Lovin' Spoonful. But to be fair they used it twice.





I get the similarities."Fresh As A Sweet Sunday Morning" from Bert Jansch's attempt at a commercial album, 1974s LA Turnaround.

16) It seems like every 2 or 3 mixes I get a Mike Nesmith solo track. And with the exception of a couple of tracks they just don't work for me. His solo work mostly seems overly slick, overly produced and under motivated. It's not particularly bad or particularly bad. It just sort of sits there. Not my thing.

Used to love him. Forgot all about him. Now coming back to him. "Navajo Trail"

[quote="TG"}Again, apologies for the late review. I've been getting ready for a big day and it's taking up all of my time. By the time of the next Mix Club I'll be a married man!!! Just a few days away now.[/quote]

All the best for the big day Tom. Happy connubials.

!. "Fight Fire" - The Golliwogs
2. "All By Myself" - Johnny Burnette and his Trio
3. "The Wolf Pack" - Kid Thomas
4. "Boo Babe" - The Electras
5. "Percolatin'" - Willie Mitchell
6. "My Next Door Neighbour" - Jerry McCain
7. "Somethings Got A Hold On n Me" - The Soul Stirrers
8. "Nobody's Dirty Business" - Mississippi John Hurt
9. "Summertime" - Billie Holiday
10. "Stop Me" - Benny Johnson
11. "The Red Rooster" - Christian Scott
12. "Fields Of Forever" - Jack Bruce
13. "Lost John" - Leo Kottke
14. "Kpindigbee (Morning, Noon and Night)" - SE Rogie
15. "Fresh As A Sweet Sunday Morning" - Bert Jansch
16. "Navajo Trail" - Mike Nesmith
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby bhoywonder » 04 Sep 2015, 15:39

The Fish wrote:Thanks mate. I actually own those Bon Iver albums :D We'll have to agree to disagree on The Black Crowes. I have a Billy Ward comp as well somewhere. That does sound hell of a lot like Jackie Wilson. My bad as they say. Muddy Waters makes perfect sense. Not sure why I don't have Electric Mud. Still easily remedied.

As for Lianne ITV, you must have read the Barry White documentary thread http://www.bcb-board.co.uk/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1817


To be clear, I think you're right that it is Jackie Wilson. I think it was from '53, when he replaced Clyde McPhatter in the group on lead vocals.

I'm not sure I'd recommend Electric Mud in its entirity, mind. What I'm saying is don't blame me if you turn it off halfway through! :lol:

I've not read that thread. I'll take a wee look now! :D

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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby The Fish » 04 Sep 2015, 16:09

Yeah, I realised after I'd posted that that was JW. I've bought ELectric Mud as half of a twofer, so I'll get another album to play as well if I don't like EM. I know its reputation and how it divides opinion, but I think it might be right up my street.
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Re: August 2015 Review

Postby bhoywonder » 07 Sep 2015, 08:41

Stick a track off it on th enext mix you do me. I'll either love it or hate it!