July/August 2014 Reviews

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fange
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July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby fange » 11 Aug 2014, 02:25

Got a big, rambling yet very enjoyable mix, lots of interesting stuff that I will be very interested to find out more about.

1. A nice acoustic folky/country-ish opener, a long track about troubled soul and his journey. Liked it.

2. Nils Lofgren with ‘Back It Up’, right up my 70s rock alley. Makes me wish I had my Nils LPs but they're still back in Melbourne. :(

3. A lovely country-blues boogie, gorgeous. Always makes me smile.

4. A left turn into big, orchestrated soul but it’s another class tune - in the classic Motor City mould but I can’t place the singer though I probably should. Reveal please.

5. A fine slice of power pop, more recent vintage rather than classic, but still very much to my tastes. Nice tight shiny vocals, and the guitars chime just right. Really enjoyed.

6. A funky, rocked up number that sounds like it was being played live. A fun one, groovy.

7. A lovely cut. The acoustic guitars, with slide touches in behind, and the big strings all mesh together beautifully to make a gorgeous mellow, country feel. The vocalist’s voice suits too, despite sounding a little like a young Peter Gabriel at his soft and breathiest. Reveal please.

8. A rocked up and bluesy-garage remake of ‘Hound Dog’, what’s not to like? Sweet guitar sound and harp blowing.

9. Haha, this is classic. I’ve sent this very song to my own mixee, though it’s by a different vocal group. Wonderful tune; it always get me rockin and reelin.

10. Some funky Latin breaks for the dancefloor, excellent. Tight as a fish’s plug-hole, and the vocalists are brilliant. Sabroso.

11. Charlie Rich doing ‘Don’t Come Knockin on my Door’, great. Rock and rolls just right.

12. A countryish- mid tempo tune that fits well in the mix, but doesn’t push my buttons as much as the other cuts here. A little busy with all the voices and banjos for me, but still nice.

13. Another slice of classic 60s soul of the Motor City variety, that rhythm section is simply unmistakable. Another I should be spotting, I’m sure, but can’t place the group. Sounds like a Smokey vocal, though I don’t think it’s the man himself. Reveal please.

14. Another folky/country-ish number with strong Dylan overtones. Lovely tune about the man’s Georgia darling, with gorgeous piano and cracking rhythm section, in fact the whole band sound right on. Shortish but very sweet. A keeper for sure.

15. A pop-rock number about love gone bad, sounds very 80s by the drum sound and general production. Fun.

16. The vocalist sounds like he’s trying to channel 80s-era Springsteen, and the tune itself sounds like the same. OK.

17. Yeah, this more to my tastes. More power pop chiming guitars over a light but strong rhythm, nice. Lots of hooks from the guitars and vibe touches, and the vocalist has a nice voice for this stuff.

18. Now, this is really where I live. That wild, manic two-step boogie rhythm connects right to my spine and makes me wanna shake baby shake. Tasty slide and chugging harp are the spice on top. Gorgeous.

19. A more contemporary sounding Soul/R&B lassie singing, and it’s an enjoyable one. Got a nice Latin feel to the horns too.

Cheers, mixer, tres bon indeed. Almost all spot on with what I really like, and some I'm very keen to track down further!
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby The Fish » 12 Aug 2014, 13:38

This was mine Ange. Glad you enjpyed it.

fangedango! wrote:Got a big, rambling yet very enjoyable mix, lots of interesting stuff that I will be very interested to find out more about.

1. A nice acoustic folky/country-ish opener, a long track about troubled soul and his journey. Liked it.

Thought it was a bit of a gamble opening with something this long and slow.
, but I love this track (almost to the point of obsession) so much. From the latest Joe Henry album (and still my album of the year) I don't always place too much importance on lyrics but everything about this just blew me away, especially the line about suddenly remembering a girl from back in school


2. Nils Lofgren with ‘Back It Up’, right up my 70s rock alley. Makes me wish I had my Nils LPs but they're still back in Melbourne. :(

Yep, it's your basic rock template, strictly meat and potatoes, but the selling point here (from the Authorised bootleg version) is the guitar. Some of the best licks this side of Bhodisattva or My Old School

3. A lovely country-blues boogie, gorgeous. Always makes me smile.

The first of two tracks here from a recent purchase, The George Mitchell collection, a great collection of blues field recordings a la Lomax. He did 45 volumes in all mostly OOP but this is from a 7cd set of the highlights. A taster if you will of all the artists, some well known and some like this less so This is Albert Macon

4. A left turn into big, orchestrated soul but it’s another class tune - in the classic Motor City mould but I can’t place the singer though I probably should. Reveal please.

It is Motown but less well known so no need to kick yourself. I was playing Bigh Hits and Hard To Find Classics Vol 4 and ended up using 3 tracks here. This is former member of the Flamingos Terry Johnson

5. A fine slice of power pop, more recent vintage rather than classic, but still very much to my tastes. Nice tight shiny vocals, and the guitars chime just right. Really enjoyed.

I have been known to browse Amazon via the user lists to see if anything is worth a punt, which is how I came across this which I bought for 1p !! The Rosenbergs

6. A funky, rocked up number that sounds like it was being played live. A fun one, groovy.

Latter day jazz vocals can sound generic a lot of the time. I still think the pick of the crop is Cassandra Wilson.

7. A lovely cut. The acoustic guitars, with slide touches in behind, and the big strings all mesh together beautifully to make a gorgeous mellow, country feel. The vocalist’s voice suits too, despite sounding a little like a young Peter Gabriel at his soft and breathiest. Reveal please.

I bought an album by the band Cherry Twister following its appearance in Brother Spoon's excellent albums of 2000 rundown which is a great slice of powerpop and thoroughly recommended. I then found the main man from this group had also issued a couple of solo albums, which cover the powerpop base as well but also some lovely things like this. It is lovely isn't it. I can almost imagine this as Art Garfunkel with a sort of Nick Drake string arrangement. The guy's name is Steve Ward

8. A rocked up and bluesy-garage remake of ‘Hound Dog’, what’s not to like? Sweet guitar sound and harp blowing.

Dale Hawkins

9. Haha, this is classic. I’ve sent this very song to my own mixee, though it’s by a different vocal group. Wonderful tune; it always get me rockin and reelin.

The second Motown pick - Barbara Randolph

10. Some funky Latin breaks for the dancefloor, excellent. Tight as a fish’s plug-hole, and the vocalists are brilliant. Sabroso.

Leave my plug hole out of this :D I've been slowly collecting the "funk experience" series of compilation discs and this is from the Cuba volume

11. Charlie Rich doing ‘Don’t Come Knockin on my Door’, great. Rock and rolls just right.

Thought it might throw you with Charlie sounding so soulful here. From his brief stay at Hi records

12. A countryish- mid tempo tune that fits well in the mix, but doesn’t push my buttons as much as the other cuts here. A little busy with all the voices and banjos for me, but still nice.

The band here were mentioned recently on BCB. Rosebud, which is basically Judy Henske and Jerry Yester post Farewell Alderbaran

13. Another slice of classic 60s soul of the Motor City variety, that rhythm section is simply unmistakable. Another I should be spotting, I’m sure, but can’t place the group. Sounds like a Smokey vocal, though I don’t think it’s the man himself. Reveal please.

Final Motown cut and a slightly better known name, Marv Johnson

14. Another folky/country-ish number with strong Dylan overtones. Lovely tune about the man’s Georgia darling, with gorgeous piano and cracking rhythm section, in fact the whole band sound right on. Shortish but very sweet. A keeper for sure.

Well that old Belgian bugger round these parts has been banging on about this guy for some while, but sometimes he gets it right :D Sammy Walker

15. A pop-rock number about love gone bad, sounds very 80s by the drum sound and general production. Fun.

I play quite a bit of Chuck Prophet, but realised it was a while since I went back to Green on Red

16. The vocalist sounds like he’s trying to channel 80s-era Springsteen, and the tune itself sounds like the same. OK.

The group is called Bloomsday and I didn't know this existed until recently as its pedigree is right up my street, consisting as it does of Chris Thompson from The Bathers and two of The Commotions

17. Yeah, this more to my tastes. More power pop chiming guitars over a light but strong rhythm, nice. Lots of hooks from the guitars and vibe touches, and the vocalist has a nice voice for this stuff.

They released their third album this year but I went back to the debut for this. Should be as big as Elbow, Cherry Ghost

18. Now, this is really where I live. That wild, manic two-step boogie rhythm connects right to my spine and makes me wanna shake baby shake. Tasty slide and chugging harp are the spice on top. Gorgeous.

Back to the George Mitchell collection, but a bigger name this time - Mississippi Fred McDowell

19. A more contemporary sounding Soul/R&B lassie singing, and it’s an enjoyable one. Got a nice Latin feel to the horns too.

I'm sure many BCBers could get snooty over this but I love it. Dutch singer Caro Emerald who trades in that whole retro swing thing. It might be over produced and somehow not "genuine" but for me it's toe-tap-tabulous

Cheers, mixer, tres bon indeed. Almost all spot on with what I really like, and some I'm very keen to track down further!



You're welcome Ange/ Always a pleasure.

1. Joe Henry - Sign
2. Nils Lofgren - Take You To The Movies/Back It Up
3. Albert Macon - Flat Foot Boogie
4. Terry Johnson - Whatcha Gonna Do
5. The Rosenbergs - Sucking On A Plum
6. Cassandra Wilson - I Thought You Knew
7. Steve Ward - Flow
8. Dale Hawkins - Hound Dog
9. Barbara Randolph - I Got A Feeling
10. Orquestra Riverside - En Casa Del Trompo No Bailes
11. Charlie Rich - Don't Come Knocling On My Door
12. Rosebud - Roll Home Cheyenne
13. Marv Johnson - I Miss You Baby
14. Sammy Walker - Brown Eyed Gerogia Darlin'
15. Green On Red - Guy Like Me
16. Bloomsday - Black River
17. Cherry Ghost - 4 a.m
18. Mississippi Fred McDowell - Shake 'em On Down
19. Caro Emerald - My Two Cents
We're way past rhubarb

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 12 Aug 2014, 16:45

Ol' tight plug-hole wrote:


14. Another folky/country-ish number with strong Dylan overtones. Lovely tune about the man’s Georgia darling, with gorgeous piano and cracking rhythm section, in fact the whole band sound right on. Shortish but very sweet. A keeper for sure.

Well that old Belgian bugger round these parts has been banging on about this guy for some while, but sometimes he gets it right :D Sammy Walker




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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby fange » 13 Aug 2014, 09:42

The Fish wrote:Leave my plug hole out of this :D



:lol:

I did say A fish, not THE fish.


Cheers, Paul, great stuff.
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby T. Willy Rye » 15 Aug 2014, 04:38

My mixer has the same problem I have- how do you mask the information for your mix tracks? Hence I will appear far more knowledgeable about these tracks than in fact I am.

First up is Rance Allen's Peace of Mind. I've noticed that he's become a darling of the JB&S crowd. He brings his strong gospel baritone to the world of soul. I like what I've heard so far and will have to investigate further. Five minutes may be pushing just a little as the last couple are mostly guitar noodling and various vocal howls.

Next (I believe the title of this is tripping the spam filter) by Oscar Brown Jr. is a soul jazz number with a sort of beat poet vocal delivery. There's a public service tone to warn us all about the dangers of the streets that's kind of quaint. Nice.

Track 3 is Kool Blues with I'm Gonna Keep on Loving You from the Eccentric Soul: Capsul Labels. I've got a lot of these Eccentric comps and haven't listened closely to all of them. However Who Knows from this one is a particular favorite. This sounds like fairly standard Staxish material from the mid 60s. It's not bad; it just doesn't blow me away.

Track 4- I'm pretty sure mixer that you, like me, acquire quite a few comps. I've picked a few tracks from this Galaxy comp. Moanin,” Groanin', and Crying for mixclub, but I think I may have overlooked a gem here by Isiah Smith.

Track 5- I remember when Kenji promoted Lou Bond and it seemed like BCB was abuzz about this one. I was a little disappointed after hearing and didn't give the record enough time. This track is a monster. 11 minutes, but I'm okay with it. I wonder how many single men wanted to adopt orphans in the 70s, the topic that seems incredibly progressive, even today. The production is just gorgeous.

Track 6 is Child of the King from Rev. RL. Hubbard taken from the Numero release Boddie Recording Co. Cleveland, OH. It's a haunting yet slightly funky gospel piece. That organ really adds a different dimension and the vocals are a Black American fire and brimstone. Another comp I own but obviously don't know well.

Track 7 is a groovtastic little number called Downhome Music by Rufus Jagneaux (never heard of him). Pretty slight, but definitely fun.

Track 8 I'm so glad you put a Rita Lee track on here. She's definitely someone I've been meaning to check out. This is really funky and weird.

Track 9 maybe my favorite. I really need to explore Barrett Strong further. I know he's mostly known as a lyricist, but this is fantastic.

Track 10 is the Latin Brothers with Las Calenas Son Como Los Flores from one of my favorite of the Soundway comps. Colombia! The Golden Age of Discos Fuentes. BCB needs a stronger Cumbia presence for sure.

Track 11 is Lee Webber's “Your Love is So Good,” a track that was included in a mix a couple of years ago (maybe by you, dear mixer?) I loved it so much that I went out and bought the Ace comp. that you pulled this from. The Heart of Southern Soul.

Track 12 I know this Quiet Elegance track from the Take Me to The River comp. That Hi Story comp you selected it from looks pretty good, though. I like the production on this one and the vocals are really nice.

Track 13 Never heard of this one. Some nice funky gospel throughout this mix.

I don't really need a track listing for this one, but I'm happy to hear your take on any of these tracks from a very solid mix.

Thanks!

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby whodathunkit » 15 Aug 2014, 12:21

1. Helluva start. Aretha and "Running Out Of Fools". Proving , yet again, that she did some excellent stuff pre-Atlantic.
2. Has to be Django. "St Louis Blues"? With the exception of Fats Waller, no-one cheers me up quicker than this bloke.
3. This is probably some combination of old Byrds and a live acoustic version of "Eight Miles High". As the original would have to be one of my all-time top 10, my first thought was "why bother" but repeated plays have warmed me to it.
4. "Car On The Hill" from Joni's 7th best album, Court and Spark. Musical nectar.
5. Time for de blooz - country style. "Generic" seems to be the put-down of the moment on BCB and this certainly is. Loved it though.
6. Procul Harum and a live cut of "Cerdes". You can hear the old soul band beneath the proggers here with the Jimmy Smith-style organ and Brooker's vocals.
7. More live stuff. A rather schmaltzy country-rock thing which gets perilously close to Eagles territory at times. Pleasant enough though.
8. Solo jazz piano version of "Aint Misbehavin'". Seeing as he never plays one note where he can play a dozen, I'm presuming this is Art Tatum. This should irritate but is actually quite beguiling. On second thoughts, listening now. it might be Waller. No, Tatum. I hate mix-club :D .
9. An old poppy r and b song about the trials and tribulations of being in love with a fat boy. You couldn't make it up :) .
10. Nice version of Gene Clark's "Tried So Hard". Could be Fairport. Vocalist sounds like Ian Matthews. Whatever, it's rather gorgeous.
11. Unmistakeably Bessie Smith with a wonderful little band behind her - all hee-hawing cornets and dirty trombone. Another winner.
12. Sweet little pop-folky track about a little bird singing, lighting up the sky, etc. Twee but cute.
13. This is "When the Revolution Comes" by the Last Poets. I know this because this is the third time somebody's sent it to me in mix club. :D . I like it. Enough already.
14. Standard folky-bluegrass performance of "Shady Grove". Impeccable banjo and guitar work.
15. Totally unexpected closer. A little piece of chamber music - violin and piano. If I had to guess I would plump for Elgar or somebody Edwardian and English. Very nice indeed.

So, a mix packed with unfamilar choices by artists I love. It didn't "stretch" or "challenge" me in the least and that's fine by me. :D . Many thanks.
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Nick Danger » 15 Aug 2014, 14:08

whodathunkit wrote:1. Helluva start. Aretha and "Running Out Of Fools". Proving , yet again, that she did some excellent stuff pre-Atlantic.

It's the 22 year old Aretha from one of her early albums.

2. Has to be Django. "St Louis Blues"? With the exception of Fats Waller, no-one cheers me up quicker than this bloke.

Yep, it's Django. This is my favorite track by him that I've discovered so far.

3. This is probably some combination of old Byrds and a live acoustic version of "Eight Miles High". As the original would have to be one of my all-time top 10, my first thought was "why bother" but repeated plays have warmed me to it.

This is ex-Byrd Chris Hillman with his partner Herb Pedersen and three other musicians. Hillman is playing mandolin this time instead of the bass guitar he played on the original.

4. "Car On The Hill" from Joni's 7th best album, Court and Spark. Musical nectar.

My favorite Joni track. This choice and the track 2 Django cut and some of the others were chosen to get your opinion on my favorite songs of some of your favorite artists.

5. Time for de blooz - country style. "Generic" seems to be the put-down of the moment on BCB and this certainly is. Loved it though.

Son House with The Jinx Blues. I love his guitar playing and phrasing. This is from the 1940 Lomax recordings when he was in his prime. Most people know him from his rediscovery in the '60's when he was older and not as good.

6. Procul Harum and a live cut of "Cerdes". You can hear the old soul band beneath the proggers here with the Jimmy Smith-style organ and Brooker's vocals.

This is from a live 1969 boot. That powerful organ and Trower's guitar make it for me.

7. More live stuff. A rather schmaltzy country-rock thing which gets perilously close to Eagles territory at times. Pleasant enough though.

My favorite country rock group Poco with a live version of Bad Weather.

8. Solo jazz piano version of "Aint Misbehavin'". Seeing as he never plays one note where he can play a dozen, I'm presuming this is Art Tatum. This should irritate but is actually quite beguiling. On second thoughts, listening now. it might be Waller. No, Tatum. I hate mix-club :D .

It is Tatum. I'm a big fan. His avowed hero and inspiration was Waller.

9. An old poppy r and b song about the trials and tribulations of being in love with a fat boy. You couldn't make it up :) .

This is underappreciated and forgotten R & B vocalist Billy Stewart. He had a few hits here in the U.S. (Summertime, Sitting In The Park) but it pretty much a cult figure now. I try to champion him whenever I can.

10. Nice version of Gene Clark's "Tried So Hard". Could be Fairport. Vocalist sounds like Ian Matthews. Whatever, it's rather gorgeous.

You're a hard man to fool, what an ear! This is Matthews from one of his solo albums.

11. Unmistakeably Bessie Smith with a wonderful little band behind her - all hee-hawing cornets and dirty trombone. Another winner.

Yep, it's Bessie. This is one of my favorite tracks by her. I think it shows off her voice really well as she barrels right through any limitations of the recording process back then.

12. Sweet little pop-folky track about a little bird singing, lighting up the sky, etc. Twee but cute.

This is my favorite baroque pop group The Left Banke. Well, maybe second to the Zombies. The young keyboard genius Michael Brown wrote most their stuff and his father, a symphony musician, produced and arranged everything. He and his symphony buddies threw in all kinds of flourishes. Oboes, bassoons, great strings . . . their first album and half of the second are great.

13. This is "When the Revolution Comes" by the Last Poets. I know this because this is the third time somebody's sent it to me in mix club. :D . I like it. Enough already.

Sorry, I didn't know that. Another of my favorite cuts.

14. Standard folky-bluegrass performance of "Shady Grove". Impeccable banjo and guitar work.

The late great Doc Watson with the definitive version of this for my money. I believe that's his son Merle on banjo.

15. Totally unexpected closer. A little piece of chamber music - violin and piano. If I had to guess I would plump for Elgar or somebody Edwardian and English. Very nice indeed.

Not English but Russian. It's a Tchaikovsky piece. My eclecticism strays into the classical arena and I find this very moving. The violinist here is Sarah Chang. The amazing thing is that at the time of this recording she was only NINE years old!

I know I took the safe route here and was trying to entertain you rather than challenge you. I also wanted to hear your opinion of some of my favorite tracks by artists we both liked. I've probably listened to this myself more than any other of my mix club submissions.


Trackslist
1. Running Out Of Fools - Aretha Franklin
2. St. Louis Blues - Django Reinhardt
3. Eight Miles High - Chris Hillman
4. Car On The Hill - Joni Mitchell
5. The Jinx Blues - Son House
6. (Outside The Gates Of) Cerdes - Procol Harum
7. Bad Weather - Poco
8. Ain't Misbehavin' - Art Tatum
9. Fat Boy - Billy Stewart
10. Tried So Hard - Ian Matthews
11. Nashville Women's Blues - Bessie Smith
12. Sing Little Bird Sing - The Left Banke
13. When The Revolution Comes - The Last Poets
14. Shady Grove - Doc Watson
15. Melody In E Flat, Op. 42, No. 3 (Tchaikovsky) - Sarah Chang

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Duncan
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Duncan » 25 Aug 2014, 16:46

T. Willy Rye wrote:My mixer has the same problem I have- how do you mask the information for your mix tracks? Hence I will appear far more knowledgeable about these tracks than in fact I am.


Gah! Part of the reason that it took so long for me to knock this mix together is the amount of time it now takes me to try and hide the track info, and would still appear that I have failed. I'm a young bloke who works in IT, why can't I do this? Anyway, at least it makes the reveal easier.

T. Willy Rye wrote:First up is Rance Allen's Peace of Mind. I've noticed that he's become a darling of the JB&S crowd. He brings his strong gospel baritone to the world of soul. I like what I've heard so far and will have to investigate further. Five minutes may be pushing just a little as the last couple are mostly guitar noodling and various vocal howls.


Aye, that about sums it up. The Capitol Rare compilation series are well worth checking out if you dig smooth jazzy rare groove stuff.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Next (I believe the title of this is tripping the spam filter) by Oscar Brown Jr. is a soul jazz number with a sort of beat poet vocal delivery. There's a public service tone to warn us all about the dangers of the streets that's kind of quaint. Nice.


Yeah, it seems very much of it's time but I think that's what gives it its charm. The track actually reminds me of something else, but I can't for the life of me figure out what that is.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 3 is Kool Blues with I'm Gonna Keep on Loving You from the Eccentric Soul: Capsul Labels. I've got a lot of these Eccentric comps and haven't listened closely to all of them. However Who Knows from this one is a particular favorite. This sounds like fairly standard Staxish material from the mid 60s. It's not bad; it just doesn't blow me away.


Yeah, I have a bunch of these too, but, like you, probably haven't spent enough time with each of them. They should be a good source of Mix Club goodies though, so I've been digging them out again recently.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 4- I'm pretty sure mixer that you, like me, acquire quite a few comps. I've picked a few tracks from this Galaxy comp. Moanin,” Groanin', and Crying for mixclub, but I think I may have overlooked a gem here by Isiah Smith.


I'm not usually mad on bluesy soul but this one is fab. And yeah, it's a great comp of Galaxy stuff. There's also one called Bad, Bad Whiskey which is worth checking out (if you haven't already).

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 5- I remember when Kenji promoted Lou Bond and it seemed like BCB was abuzz about this one. I was a little disappointed after hearing and didn't give the record enough time. This track is a monster. 11 minutes, but I'm okay with it. I wonder how many single men wanted to adopt orphans in the 70s, the topic that seems incredibly progressive, even today. The production is just gorgeous.


Generally I was slightly underwhelmed by the whole album, but this track is a thing of beauty and well worth all 11 minutes.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 6 is Child of the King from Rev. RL. Hubbard taken from the Numero release Boddie Recording Co. Cleveland, OH. It's a haunting yet slightly funky gospel piece. That organ really adds a different dimension and the vocals are a Black American fire and brimstone. Another comp I own but obviously don't know well.


The Boddie comp is probably my favourite of the Eccentric Soul releases. A lot of love went in to that.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 7 is a groovtastic little number called Downhome Music by Rufus Jagneaux (never heard of him). Pretty slight, but definitely fun.


I don't know anything about these guys either, except that they're from Louisiana and there's a couple of cool, jaunty, swampy tracks by them on the Another Saturday Night comp from Ace.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 8 I'm so glad you put a Rita Lee track on here. She's definitely someone I've been meaning to check out. This is really funky and weird.


The first couple of albums are definitely well worth getting hold of.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 9 maybe my favorite. I really need to explore Barrett Strong further. I know he's mostly known as a lyricist, but this is fantastic.


I've been revisiting the early Motown singles and this was one of the big stand-outs from 1961.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 10 is the Latin Brothers with Las Calenas Son Como Los Flores from one of my favorite of the Soundway comps. Colombia! The Golden Age of Discos Fuentes. BCB needs a stronger Cumbia presence for sure.


I figured you'd know this one, but it's awesome so I stuck it in anyway.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 11 is Lee Webber's “Your Love is So Good,” a track that was included in a mix a couple of years ago (maybe by you, dear mixer?) I loved it so much that I went out and bought the Ace comp. that you pulled this from. The Heart of Southern Soul.


Ah, it probably was me. This is another reason why this Mix seemed to take so long to put together. I went through several aborted attempts, abandoning about fifty songs when I couldn't remember if I'd used them before or not. Despite probably being the closest musical thing to me on BCB, you're swiftly becoming the trickiest mixee. Expect a collection of deep techno 12 inches next time.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 12 I know this Quiet Elegance track from the Take Me to The River comp. That Hi Story comp you selected it from looks pretty good, though. I like the production on this one and the vocals are really nice.


It's a great slab of southern soul. I'd forgotten that it was on Take Me To The River. I'm going to listen to that again right now.

T. Willy Rye wrote:Track 13 Never heard of this one. Some nice funky gospel throughout this mix.


This is the Voices Of East Harlem, probably my favourite band about which I know absolutely nothing. They keep showing up on various compilations and I've loved every track, but I have just never quite gotten around to following it up, mostly because the albums are only available on expensive imports.

T. Willy Rye wrote:I don't really need a track listing for this one, but I'm happy to hear your take on any of these tracks from a very solid mix.

Thanks!


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Nick Danger
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Nick Danger » 02 Sep 2014, 01:23

My mix this month also came with the names of the artists and tracks but I wasn't familiar with most of it and it really didn't diminish the listening pleasure for me.

1. The first track is from the Showmen and it is a great example of a regional genre here in North and South Carolina - Beach Music! Growing up here I have heard the Showmen before and this is a great song. Great way to personalize it for me. Good start.

2. I'm not familiar with the group or the song here but it's a highlight of the mix for me. I'll have to investigate this group further. I like this a lot.

3. We're going Latin now with Ray Barretto and El Watusi. I've heard this before but it was long ago. I need to get more into Latin music but it just so daunting coming from so many countries. Another good one.

4. Train Kept A Rollin' by Tiny Bradshaw. This guy is great and really should be better known. I need to look for some of his albums. I haven't heard this before but I think I have a cover of it somewhere by the Kinks. It's in a jump blues style complete with honking sax and Tiny's great voice.

5. This one's by Willy DeVille a name I recognize but this is probably the first song I've heard by him. It's not as appealing as what came before but not bad.

6. This one I might have guessed without the label, the 5 Royales, a really fine doo wop group. I like it.

7. An instrumental by a group I've never heard of but it really cooks. I liked it better every time I played it. This is a well put together and sequenced mix.

8. Another old time R & B tune, tinkling piano, great horns and drums, love the sax solo. Good choice.

9. More vintage R & B and Jump Blues, not quite as good as the previous song but flows nicely from it.

10. Another winner, I'm loving this vintage R & B, more great horns. All this old stuff is right up my alley.

11. I didn't know Dizzy Gillespie ventured outside of jazz into the R & B arena but this is different from the other stuff I've heard from him. I like this a lot. Sublime playing.

12. Dr. John with a nice tune about his woman changing the locks and his key not fitting the lock anymore. Fits nicely in the mix, another good one.

13. A well performed R & B track but it doesn't connect with me like most of the rest. That's more a testament to the other songs. It's not bad by any means.

14. Finally one I know, JJ Cale with Call Me The Breeze. It's a classic and I need to pull out my JJ Cale cds. A departure from most of the mix but it's nice to hear this again. Thanks.

15. And I know this one pretty well too. Hank Ballard with Finger Poppin' Time. Hank and the Midnighters laid down some good tracks. They were also historically important but are largely forgotten now. Good way to close.

Labeled or not, I really enjoyed this mix. It was definitely to my taste with the vintage R & B and Jump Blues with a few other things thrown in. It holds together as a cohesive mix certainly much better than my multiple genre kitchen sink efforts. Thanks so much!

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby TG » 02 Sep 2014, 14:56

Nick Danger wrote:My mix this month also came with the names of the artists and tracks but I wasn't familiar with most of it and it really didn't diminish the listening pleasure for me.

1. The first track is from the Showmen and it is a great example of a regional genre here in North and South Carolina - Beach Music! Growing up here I have heard the Showmen before and this is a great song. Great way to personalize it for me. Good start.

2. I'm not familiar with the group or the song here but it's a highlight of the mix for me. I'll have to investigate this group further. I like this a lot.

3. We're going Latin now with Ray Barretto and El Watusi. I've heard this before but it was long ago. I need to get more into Latin music but it just so daunting coming from so many countries. Another good one.

4. Train Kept A Rollin' by Tiny Bradshaw. This guy is great and really should be better known. I need to look for some of his albums. I haven't heard this before but I think I have a cover of it somewhere by the Kinks. It's in a jump blues style complete with honking sax and Tiny's great voice.

5. This one's by Willy DeVille a name I recognize but this is probably the first song I've heard by him. It's not as appealing as what came before but not bad.

6. This one I might have guessed without the label, the 5 Royales, a really fine doo wop group. I like it.

7. An instrumental by a group I've never heard of but it really cooks. I liked it better every time I played it. This is a well put together and sequenced mix.

8. Another old time R & B tune, tinkling piano, great horns and drums, love the sax solo. Good choice.

9. More vintage R & B and Jump Blues, not quite as good as the previous song but flows nicely from it.

10. Another winner, I'm loving this vintage R & B, more great horns. All this old stuff is right up my alley.

11. I didn't know Dizzy Gillespie ventured outside of jazz into the R & B arena but this is different from the other stuff I've heard from him. I like this a lot. Sublime playing.

12. Dr. John with a nice tune about his woman changing the locks and his key not fitting the lock anymore. Fits nicely in the mix, another good one.

13. A well performed R & B track but it doesn't connect with me like most of the rest. That's more a testament to the other songs. It's not bad by any means.

14. Finally one I know, JJ Cale with Call Me The Breeze. It's a classic and I need to pull out my JJ Cale cds. A departure from most of the mix but it's nice to hear this again. Thanks.

15. And I know this one pretty well too. Hank Ballard with Finger Poppin' Time. Hank and the Midnighters laid down some good tracks. They were also historically important but are largely forgotten now. Good way to close.

Labeled or not, I really enjoyed this mix. It was definitely to my taste with the vintage R & B and Jump Blues with a few other things thrown in. It holds together as a cohesive mix certainly much better than my multiple genre kitchen sink efforts. Thanks so much!


I don't get it. When The Fish got this mix from me he couldn't see the names and titles (save for one) but you can see them. Also, it seems you got a mix in a completely different order than what I intended to send. I'm going to go through your review and see if I can figure out what you heard and post the reveal.

Also, back with my review in a few hours or so.
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby TG » 03 Sep 2014, 22:01

Nick Danger wrote:My mix this month also came with the names of the artists and tracks but I wasn't familiar with most of it and it really didn't diminish the listening pleasure for me.

Well, I'm glad you enjoyed the mix but a bit disappointed that the titles, etc. were visible. I really thought I'd figured it out. Also you got it out of sequence so thanks for the sequencing compliment but it seems to have been happenstance. I'm going to go through in the order you received it and see if I can figure out the mystery tracks.

1. The first track is from the Showmen and it is a great example of a regional genre here in North and South Carolina - Beach Music! Growing up here I have heard the Showmen before and this is a great song. Great way to personalize it for me. Good start.

You got a mix of things I'd been playing recently. An old record collecting pal was in town and staying at my place and we spent a good deal of time playing records and this is some of what we played. This track sort of set the mood for what I had planned and so seemed the right place take off from. I love General Johnson's voice.

2. I'm not familiar with the group or the song here but it's a highlight of the mix for me. I'll have to investigate this group further. I like this a lot.

We'll return to this one.

3. We're going Latin now with Ray Barretto and El Watusi. I've heard this before but it was long ago. I need to get more into Latin music but it just so daunting coming from so many countries. Another good one.

A personal favorite that comes with a story. One time back around 1985 Ruben Guevara (of Ruben & the Jets fame), another friend and myself are hanging out at my house listening to records, drinking gin and smoking reefer. This song comes on and my friend and I, not being fluent Spanish speakers, ask Ruben to translate the lyrics. He drunkenly comes up with "I'm bad, I'm bad, I'm a bad man...". My friend and I point out that we know enough Spanish to understand those phrases and that didn't seem to be correct. And certainly not complete. Ruben stuck to his guns and the conversation moved on to other of the world's problems. I can't hear this without thinking of that memory.

4. Train Kept A Rollin' by Tiny Bradshaw. This guy is great and really should be better known. I need to look for some of his albums. I haven't heard this before but I think I have a cover of it somewhere by the Kinks. It's in a jump blues style complete with honking sax and Tiny's great voice.

The original, as far as I know. I have a couple of Yardbirds' versions and the Aerosmith cover but this one is far and away the best. I do love Jump Blues.

5. This one's by Willy DeVille a name I recognize but this is probably the first song I've heard by him. It's not as appealing as what came before but not bad.

Willy's cover of Oliver Morgan's New Orleans classic Who Shot The La-La. A fine version from later in Willy's life. A damn shame he died but miraculous, I suppose, that he lasted as long as he did.

6. This one I might have guessed without the label, the 5 Royales, a really fine doo wop group. I like it.

Yep, The 5 Royales doing The Slummer The Slum. A tragically overlooked group of their era. Lowman Pauling, in addition to being a fine guitarist, wrote Dedicated To The One I Love, Tell The Truth, Think and a slew of other great songs. Like this one.

7. An instrumental by a group I've never heard of but it really cooks. I liked it better every time I played it. This is a well put together and sequenced mix.

You mentioned instrumental so that means that this must be Pig Foots from a Georgie Fame live CD I have. I think it might be a bootleg. I have a copy someone gave me. It's called Live at the Blue Moon, Uxbridge, England December 1964. It's a whole set of songs as good as this. It was hard to pick one to use.

8. Another old time R & B tune, tinkling piano, great horns and drums, love the sax solo. Good choice.

We'll return to this one.

9. More vintage R & B and Jump Blues, not quite as good as the previous song but flows nicely from it.

We'll return to this one.

10. Another winner, I'm loving this vintage R & B, more great horns. All this old stuff is right up my alley.

We'll return to this one.

11. I didn't know Dizzy Gillespie ventured outside of jazz into the R & B arena but this is different from the other stuff I've heard from him. I like this a lot. Sublime playing.

From a genre hopping LP called Soul And Salvation. It's called Rutabaga Pie and had graced several Mix Club mixes because I think everyone should hear this song.

12. Dr. John with a nice tune about his woman changing the locks and his key not fitting the lock anymore. Fits nicely in the mix, another good one.

I'm not sure if this ever actually came out back in the 60s. It's Mac Rebannack (he wasn't Dr. John yet) and Ronnie Barron as Drits & Dravy. They did release one incredibly rare single under that name called Talk That Talk that is a monster. This one is nearly as good and seems to be called My Key Don't Fit (Somebody). From a recent AFO Records comp.

13. A well performed R & B track but it doesn't connect with me like most of the rest. That's more a testament to the other songs. It's not bad by any means.

We'll return to this one.

14. Finally one I know, JJ Cale with Call Me The Breeze. It's a classic and I need to pull out my JJ Cale cds. A departure from most of the mix but it's nice to hear this again. Thanks.

This probably fit better where I had it sequenced. I recently got a J.J. Cale comp and this song has been heard around these parts a lot lately.

15. And I know this one pretty well too. Hank Ballard with Finger Poppin' Time. Hank and the Midnighters laid down some good tracks. They were also historically important but are largely forgotten now. Good way to close.

I saw Hank Ballard in the 1980s and his backup band was made up of members of The Blasters and X and Los Lobos. They were insanely good.

Now this leaves 5 tracks I'm not positive about. They are as follows -

New Orleans drummer Charles "Hungry" Williams taking a star turn with a 45 called So Worried. Based on your description I think it's your track 8. This was on a 4 CD NOLA comp I got recently and it quickly became a fave of mine.

Sam Butera & the Witnesses doing Dig That Crazy Chick. This could be your track 9. These guys were Louis Prima and Keely Smith's band. I found this on a lounge comp at a thrift store and it was worth the dollar I paid by itself.

An early Dan Penn single called Is A Bluebird Blue? It was a minor hit in a very different version by some C&W artist in the 60s. I found this on somebody's blog and is one of the few things I've ever downloaded.

Lil Band of Gold - a sort of modern day Swamp Pop supergroup doing the old John Fred and the Playboys hit Shirley. Tough CDs to find but they are worth it. A fine band.

An early Johnny Winter track called The Guy You Left Behind. A Huey Meaux produced stab at a New Orleams style thang. I assume it must be brother Edgar on piano.


Labeled or not, I really enjoyed this mix. It was definitely to my taste with the vintage R & B and Jump Blues with a few other things thrown in. It holds together as a cohesive mix certainly much better than my multiple genre kitchen sink efforts. Thanks so much!

I hope that all makes sense. I'm sure you'll figure it out from the titles. I'm glad you liked the mix. It was a blast to make.

I'll get to my review but got called in to work and it will have to wait. Coming soon, though. I swear.



It Will Stand The Showmen
So Worried Charles "Hungry" Williams
Dig That Crazy Chick Sam Butera & The Witnesses
Is A Bluebird Blue Dan Penn
Rutabaga Pie Dizzy Gillespie
My Key Don't Fit (Somebody) Drits 'n' Dravy
The Guy Left You Behind Johnny Winter
Call Me The Breeze J.J. Cale
Finger Poppin' Time Hank Ballard & the Midnighters
Shirley Lil' Band O' Gold
El Watusi Ray Barretto
Train Kept A' Rollin' Tiny Bradshaw
Who Shot The La-La Willy DeVille
The Slummer The Slum The 5 Royales
Pig Foots Georgie Fame
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Duncan » 03 Sep 2014, 22:10

So review time. First up, apologies that this took forever. It's certainly no reflection on how much I listened to and enjoyed the mix. Things have just been a bit hectic lately and I really like to put some time in to my reviews (which probably isn't obvious, but I do) and I haven't been able to do that this month. Sorry about that. Also, blame Fange and his free-time-sucking JB&S Cup. I will regain my old Mix Club form next month, I promise.

Anyway, on with the show.

1. I love me a tropical beat to get me in the mood for Mix Clubbing. There's not really any kind of song here, but that doesn't really matter, it's just a laid-back groove and loads of fun at that.

2. I'm not so mad on this one. Nothing particularly bad or anything, just a little bit too ploddy and I'm not a huge sax-rock guy. I did like the intro though.

3. This is an interesting one. It's Ray Charles, yes? It sounds a bit like him but I don't think I know it. The arrangement is very bold and up front and Ray gets lost a bit. That said, I really do like it a lot.

4. Another curious one. The song itself is relatively standard but the production is fascinating and all over the place, in that big wonderfully over the top way that you could get away with in the 60s. Nice.

5. One from the dusty archives. This is charming; nice and jaunty and I love the fiddling and the casual vocal sparring. Good stuff.

6. A pretty cool, organ-heavy instrumental work-out. The musicians are tight but the groove is loose and builds up a good head of steam. The trumpet solo is a particular highlight.

7. Wow. Some novelty nonsense about Martians. It was quite interesting on the first listen. Less so after repeated spins. I'm kinda keen to know exactly what the story is (if there is one) about this.

8. A weird all-string ensemble. It's great. I can't say that I hear a lot of cello music so this was cool to get exposed to something new.

9. Hot risque ukulele action. I assume that this is some kind of musichall thing from the 20s or 30s but the recording quality sounds amazing and crystal clear so maybe it was recorded later. Or maybe not. I'm genuinely curious about early recording methods. Do tell, dear mixer.

10. 60s British psych whimsy to washboard beat. I assume that 'Granny's trip' was a euphemism and not about a coach journey to Mablethorpe? Cool stuff.

11. A feel-good oldie. It kind of reminds me of Bugs Bunny cartoons. Not something that I'd choose to listen to a lot, but I do enjoy these little mix nuggets.

12. Dreamy, shimmery, psychey. The vocals are a little bit weak, but it's not a deal-breaker because the swirly noise and guitar picking are top notch. I love how this ends up being like three different songs rolled in to one. "I speak of colours that you've never seen before". I can't get enough of these kind of daft trippy lyrics. Actually, forget what I said about the vocals, this is favourite track on the disc (apart from the Irma/Mimms one-two later on).

13. I suppose that this is a punk band trying to be deliberately provocative, but the, um, dated subject matter is still a bit off-putting (which it was probably meant to be). Apart from that, a generally enjoyable slab of fuzzy noise.

14. Another one that I can't quite decide exactly what I make of it. The bass and piano are pretty infectious and I dig the flat baritone vocals. I think there's something off with the production, particularly at the chorus - the backing vocals and stuff like that. Anyway, I'm going to give it tentative thumbs up and then stick with it. I'm looking forward to the reveal and possible further investigations.

15. Twee 60s fun. I like this one a lot. I'm a sucker for harmonies and this kind of charmingly innocent nostalgic pop. The drumming's ace too.

16. Vampy instrumental goodness. I can't think of much to say about it, but it's definitely right up my street.

17. Ah, another goodie, although I know this one. Irma is one of my absolute faves. Those vocals are perfect. She really knows how to hit all the rights spots without sounding like she's making any effort at all.

18. One of my favourite female vocalists followed by my favourite male. In a lot of ways this is very different to Two Winters Long. That was all very understated and laid-back, whereas this is all glossy production and big arrangements, but the end result is equally amazing.

19. Sixteen tracks without a clue and then three come along at once. This is Timi Yuro with It'll Never Be Over For Me. Fantastic stuff, great arrangement. Love the Baby Washington version too.

20. Another Northern Soul classic. I'd forgotten how amazing this track is, so thanks a lot. It's Homer Banks, although I had to check iTunes to jog my memory. I have so many Northern Soul comps but I always struggle to remember the artists.

21. Crackly big band jazz and it's a belter. They were just heating up when it finished. I could've happily wolfed down another five minutes of this.


Thanks a million. I really enjoyed the wide date and genre range, and all 21 tracks had something to enjoy. I'll definitely be doing some post-reveal investigating. Cheers again.
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Rayge » 08 Sep 2014, 16:14

Sgt Pepper wrote:So review time. First up, apologies that this took forever.

No problem at all, dear boy - I still have not reviewed mine.
Anyway,

1. I love me a tropical beat to get me in the mood for Mix Clubbing. There's not really any kind of song here, but that doesn't really matter, it's just a laid-back groove and loads of fun at that.
One of the most irresistibly danceworthy rekkids ever made imo, and just about Chip's favourite tune: it's the Jimmy Castor Bunch doing Hey Leroy from 1968
2. I'm not so mad on this one. Nothing particularly bad or anything, just a little bit too ploddy and I'm not a huge sax-rock guy. I did like the intro though.
Wild Weekend by the Rocking Rebels, recorded in 1960 and a US top ten hit two years later, by which time the band didn't really exist any more. That intro was the hook, really
3. This is an interesting one. It's Ray Charles, yes? It sounds a bit like him but I don't think I know it. The arrangement is very bold and up front and Ray gets lost a bit. That said, I really do like it a lot.
Yes, this is Ray, but the reason I included it is that it's basically the Margie Hendricks show, with the lead singer of the Raelettes really giving him a run for his money in the call and response vocals. It's a 1963 single, Don't Set me Free; quite a big hit here.
4. Another curious one. The song itself is relatively standard but the production is fascinating and all over the place, in that big wonderfully over the top way that you could get away with in the 60s. Nice.
This is the Drifters, with Rudy Lewis doing one of his last lead vocals before joining the 27 club. It was released in 1963 as the follow-up to On Broadway. That arrangement - all kinds of brilliant and bizarre pop arrangements came out of New York in the early 1960s, one of my favourite places in musical space-time - I could write a book, but I probably won't
5. One from the dusty archives. This is charming; nice and jaunty and I love the fiddling and the casual vocal sparring. Good stuff.
The Memphis Jug Band with Insane Crazy Blues from 1934. As you may have read, I do like to give things a thematic link, and since all I really new of your taste was that you liked soul and blues, aren't averse to pop, have open ears and are considerably younger than me, so probably wouldn't know much of the 2nd division stuff from the early 1960s, the best I could come up with was to riff on your avatar name (hence Sgt Pepper's Lively Head Trip Mix) and to be as diverse as, as lively, and as trippy as possible. This track, which I've only just acquired on a comp, seemed to fit right in
6. A pretty cool, organ-heavy instrumental work-out. The musicians are tight but the groove is loose and builds up a good head of steam. The trumpet solo is a particular highlight.
This is a case in point. I would expect anyone over 60 to recognize the tune, You Can't Sit Down, which was a million-seller for its writer, 20-year-old guitarist Phil Upchurch, in 1961. It was spread over two halves of the single, but the mp3 unites both halves
7. Wow. Some novelty nonsense about Martians. It was quite interesting on the first listen. Less so after repeated spins. I'm kinda keen to know exactly what the story is (if there is one) about this.
Hah. Always the way with novelty records. This is The Martian Hop by the Ran-dells, one of several American hits in the early 1960s (1963) to use electronic effects. I love it. It was put together in a garage by three teenage cousins from New Jersey. I found the combination of daft lyrics - 'We have just discovered / an important note from space. / The Martians plan to throw a dance / for all the human race) doowop bass voice, speeded-up falsetto, handclaps and excitingly different boingy-boingy electronic noises (this record was released before the Dr Who Theme first aired) irresistible then, and still do today, to an extent
8. A weird all-string ensemble. It's great. I can't say that I hear a lot of cello music so this was cool to get exposed to something new.
This is new - 21st century in fact. It's the Portland Cello Project, a kind of loose collective (much like Godspeed!) whose stated aims are 'to bring the cello to places you wouldn't normally hear it, to play music on the cello you wouldn't normally hear played on the instrument, and to build bridges across all musical communities by bringing a diverse assortment of musical collaborators on stage with them.' this last aim means that some of their tracks feature vocals which aren't always appropriate, but at their best as on this track, Danza del Fuego, they really, ahem, catch fire.
9. Hot risque ukulele action. I assume that this is some kind of musichall thing from the 20s or 30s but the recording quality sounds amazing and crystal clear so maybe it was recorded later. Or maybe not. I'm genuinely curious about early recording methods. Do tell, dear mixer.
I think the quality is down to the remastering (or possibly the 78 they remastered it from), but your first instincts were right, it's from 1927, which means it precedes George Formby's recording career. It's Art Fowler [presumably not the EastEnders character] and his Ukelele with No Wonder She's a Blushing Bride. I got it from a rather splendid (Dutch?) vintage music series called Flashbacks, more specifically from their 'Copulation Blues' album, which includes all sorts of filth. I looked him up for the first time just now and was astonished to find out that he was an American.
10. 60s British psych whimsy to washboard beat. I assume that 'Granny's trip' was a euphemism and not about a coach journey to Mablethorpe? Cool stuff.
The first time I heard this was when the DJ at Middle Earth played it to the crowd waiting to see Beefheart and the Magic Band in early 1968. All the hippies, who had been lying on the basement floor digging the light show (incidentally, about 20 years later I met the guy who was doing those lights, Reg Eagle, who was a boyhood friend of Chip's brother, Peter, and hence of her. He went out under The Lights of the Charge Brigade) and started hopping about in an alarming manner (this was my first ever contact with druggies of any stripe - I was 19). Granny Takes a Trip was a psychedelic / vintage clothes boutique in the King's Road (which is where the title comes from), but the group were basically a post-Trad jug band from Cheshire, who took the name The Purple Gang (a bunch of bootleggers from Detroit) because of their 1920s roots and sharp suits, and the lyrics are actually totally innocent whimsy about an old lady who dreams of breaking into Hollywood movies via the audition route - 'She always turns up / But she's always turned down', but it was banned by the Beeb immediately and so became notorious
11. A feel-good oldie. It kind of reminds me of Bugs Bunny cartoons. Not something that I'd choose to listen to a lot, but I do enjoy these little mix nuggets.
From 1933, Jack Wilbur and his Band, with one Sam Browne on vocals, present We'll All Go Riding on a Rainbow, taken from one of those comps that present Bonzo-Dog style tunes. Imagine how banned this would have been if they had released it with guitars in 1967.
12. Dreamy, shimmery, psychey. The vocals are a little bit weak, but it's not a deal-breaker because the swirly noise and guitar picking are top notch. I love how this ends up being like three different songs rolled in to one. "I speak of colours that you've never seen before". I can't get enough of these kind of daft trippy lyrics. Actually, forget what I said about the vocals, this is favourite track on the disc (apart from the Irma/Mimms one-two later on).
I'm thrilled to have been able to play this gem to someone who has never heard it before. The first time I heard it was when John Peel was guest DJ at a uni dance in 1967 or so, and I was emboldened to ask after it, so I could order it: Fontana TF 777, but I was unable to lay my hands on a copy until an extortionate ten bob persuaded my flatmate JD (now my financial advisor, oddly enough) to part with his copy in 1970. Most people know the Misunderstood, an American band that recorded in Britain (I'm a bit hazy but I think Vietnam draft-dodging was involved), if at all, from their second, inferior, single, Children of the Sun, but this is their first, I Can Take You to the Sun (with a fine version of Diddley's Who Do You Love? on the B-side), featuring some dynamic playing, two great guitar solos from Glen 'Fernando' Campbell (i.e. not the Wichita Lineman, another one) and, as you point out, some magnificently haughty lyrics: 'With half a mind / you laugh at me / Because I speak of colours / you've never seen before. / You've existed in a lie /that will someday show / I can take you to the sun (to the sun) / but you don't want to go.' It's actually possibly to see it as a high Romantic song (or songs, take that point absolutely) about art and ideas and other hifalutin stuff, rather than a drug song, too, which helps.
13. I suppose that this is a punk band trying to be deliberately provocative, but the, um, dated subject matter is still a bit off-putting (which it was probably meant to be). Apart from that, a generally enjoyable slab of fuzzy noise.
When I read this review I wondered what track it could possibly be, then I realized that it was probably the reference to 'schoolgirls'. I'm sure they're only referencing 6th-formers, sarge :) . I tend to think of this as a cousin to the MC5's Teenage Lust. It's the A-side of the second single by arty bastard post-punks The Table (who as far as I know only released four tracks, three of which are brilliant), Sex Cells. I love the pace, the bass, the whole fidgety nature of the song - you can just feel the poor bastard squirming with lust and frustration - and one of the great rhymes in modern popular song: 'I'm obsessed with a mad desire for sex, / Upper chest regions that are convex'
14. Another one that I can't quite decide exactly what I make of it. The bass and piano are pretty infectious and I dig the flat baritone vocals. I think there's something off with the production, particularly at the chorus - the backing vocals and stuff like that. Anyway, I'm going to give it tentative thumbs up and then stick with it. I'm looking forward to the reveal and possible further investigations.
I'm not sure where I got the impression, but I thought you were from Nottingham, so I naturally turned to Leicester's finest (can anyone think of a band from Derby - fucked if I can?) quasi-psychedelic literary post-punk accountants Yeah Yeah No for their considerably altered version of the old soul number (it was in the cup this year, first time I realized this wasn't a band original) Stealing in the Name of the Lord. Along with the Dancing Did, they are one of the great lost bands of that period. If you want to check them and their Joe Orton obsessions , there was an excellent comp fairly recently called Leicester Squares. Everything else is out of print, or was when I last looked. :(
15. Twee 60s fun. I like this one a lot. I'm a sucker for harmonies and this kind of charmingly innocent nostalgic pop. The drumming's ace too.
You obviously haven't read all my BCB 130 on the Everly Brothers :) as this features there towards the end. It's Milk Train from 1967. I agree with every word of your review, except maybe 'twee' - play it at the correct volume, and that drummer drives the train right into your skull.
16. Vampy instrumental goodness. I can't think of much to say about it, but it's definitely right up my street.
I knew you'd like this, a lovely piece of Hammond playing by Hank Jacobs entitled So Far Away from early in 1964 on Sue. He also plays the piano on this track.
17. Ah, another goodie, although I know this one. Irma is one of my absolute faves. Those vocals are perfect. She really knows how to hit all the rights spots without sounding like she's making any effort at all.
Knew I was on a winner here!
18. One of my favourite female vocalists followed by my favourite male. In a lot of ways this is very different to Two Winters Long. That was all very understated and laid-back, whereas this is all glossy production and big arrangements, but the end result is equally amazing.
This was, I think, GM's first British single not to have the Enchanters' name on it. Again, I already knew from the JB&S cup that you liked the man, so a bit of a gimme
19. Sixteen tracks without a clue and then three come along at once. This is Timi Yuro with It'll Never Be Over For Me. Fantastic stuff, great arrangement. Love the Baby Washington version too.
Timi has an astonishing voice and an enormous catalogue of hardly-known brilliant performances. She was my favourite performer bar none for years. I'm particularly fond of this track, not so much for what's in the grooves as for the fact that its Northern Soul connection meant that the single I bought in a 10p bargain bin for completion's sake (I already had it on an album) in around 1971 I sold 40 years later for £250.Now THAT's a thrift shop score
20. Another Northern Soul classic. I'd forgotten how amazing this track is, so thanks a lot. It's Homer Banks, although I had to check iTunes to jog my memory. I have so many Northern Soul comps but I always struggle to remember the artists.
I admit to being totally baffled by this. As far as I'm concerned track 20 in the mix is the insanely over-the-top doo-wop / jump version of Unchained Melody by Vito and the Salutations from 1963.
21. Crackly big band jazz and it's a belter. They were just heating up when it finished. I could've happily wolfed down another five minutes of this.
This is a beaut, isn't it, a legacy of my time as a subeditor on Jazz Greats? The reason it stops so abruptly is that it's a single from the 78 rpm era (around the year I was born, 1948), that could not go on any longer and it's a notable example of someone trying to put together a be-bop big band. That someone was the vocalist on this track, Billy Eckstine, and the two tenors that carry it away are Dexter Gordon and Gene Ammons

Thanks a million. I really enjoyed the wide date and genre range, and all 21 tracks had something to enjoy. I'll definitely be doing some post-reveal investigating. Cheers again.
Ah, you're very welcome. Give me a cough if there's anything you want to investigate further.
KAT/COYS

You can't play a tune on an absolute

When the ball sleeps it dreams it is a Frisbee

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby TG » 10 Sep 2014, 21:41

With apologies for tardiness here is my review. This is a fine mix that hits a lot of my sweet spots. Thanks so much to the mixer.

1) Phil Alvin from his first solo LP. Has that record ever come out on CD? Anyway, this is Next Week Sometime and it really is a nice solo guitar and voice track. And what a voice! I used to see The Blasters all the time back in the day and Phil can still sing today. I saw he and bro Dave do a duet show a couple of weeks ago to promote the new Big Bill Broonzy covers CD. A great song to start out the mix.

2) No idea wheat this might be. A cool, swampy Americana track. A fine band hitting a stellar groove. I like this a lot.

3) No idea again. A slow Second Line parade type rhythm but this isn't a New Orleans track. Bluesy, gruff vocals but not much of a song. It's interesting but not entirely my thing. It never seems to take off from where it started.

4) A bit like a Mark Lanegan track but not nearly as good a singer. I like the Chet Baker-isms on the trumpet and the strings are nicely arranged.

5) More Americana, I suppose. Again, I have no idea who this might be. I don't really like this one much. It just goes to show that you can dress up a song any way you want. But Phil Alvin with just an acoustic guitar can make you look awfully silly.

6) Wow, you don't get many songs written about Pittsburgh, PA. Kind of a Dylan and the Band type track. No one here is as talented as any of those people but this one is interesting. The problem seems to be that these folks don't know how to make a song build or how to use dynamics to make things interesting. And you better have a stellar piece of songwriting if you're going to go that route.

7) Nice slide guitar work. A simple bluesy track. I like the instrumentation. Already mentioned the slide work but the fiddle, simple percussion and acoustic bass all add to the stew. I dig the drony, dragged out vocals. I would look further into this act.

8) This is pretty hip. Songs about pork & beans are probably only slightly more common than songs about Pittsburgh. Sort of a Black Keys simplicity folded into a ZZ Top sense of humor. This is pretty hip.

9) You gotta love the reverb drenched cheap guitar sound. The (less powerful) When The Levee Breaks style drumming is cool, too. I like this one. It does actually build to a really primitive detuned guitar solo. There are real dynamics. It's kinda weird but in a good way.

10) I'm not sure how this fits in to the mix but it is a firm favorite of mine and I've not heard it in a while. This one got the girlfriend dancing and singing along. Joe Jackson doing Steppin' Out.

11) Starts with some really nice guitar playing as the band slowly come in and fill in the sound. Dynamics - that's what I'm talking about. Unfortunately the singer kinda blows. Musically a cool track but the lyrics and vocals let it down.

12) A bit of 80s stylee white funk. The chorus puts me in mind of some other song and I can't place it. It drives me crazy every listen.

13) Great instrumentation again. Accordion & fiddle - you can't hardly go wrong. This one puts me in mind of Mark Lanegan again. But the "Shoot baby shoot..." chorus part breaks the song up. They just get going and then they cut to an annoying chorus part that does nothing for me. This could have been a fine record.

14) Space age bachelor pad, loungey instrumentation - Vibes, drummer tapping the rim of the snare with all the right offbeats, nice production. How do you find a vibes player? There can't be that many around.

15) Nice piano to open the track. Sounds like a bit from some soundtrack, perhaps. A bit classical in style and a pretty minor key melody. Nice playing all around. At around the halfway point it gets more jazzy and the pace picks up. A really nice track and a fine way to end the mix.

So it was a bit hit and miss for me. Opened and closed with great tracks and enough good stuff in the middle that I'd like to know more about to hold my interest. Thanks much to my mixer.

Also, as a promise to all - I will be much more prompt in all things Mix Club in the coming months.
Jeff K wrote:Not at all. I love TG. I might be the only one on BCB who does but I don't care.

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 17 Sep 2014, 19:34

TG wrote:With apologies for tardiness here is my review. This is a fine mix that hits a lot of my sweet spots. Thanks so much to the mixer.
Bonsoir, this came from me.
1) Phil Alvin from his first solo LP. Has that record ever come out on CD? Anyway, this is Next Week Sometime and it really is a nice solo guitar and voice track. And what a voice! I used to see The Blasters all the time back in the day and Phil can still sing today. I saw he and bro Dave do a duet show a couple of weeks ago to promote the new Big Bill Broonzy covers CD. A great song to start out the mix.
You once wondered how I knew Hollywood Fats. Well, it was the Blasters connection. So here is Phil from his diverse and excellent first solo album. Love the guys.
2) No idea wheat this might be. A cool, swampy Americana track. A fine band hitting a stellar groove. I like this a lot. nother young chap who sound old.
A relative newcomer is John Fullbright. This is Gawd Above from his first official solo album.
3) No idea again. A slow Second Line parade type rhythm but this isn't a New Orleans track. Bluesy, gruff vocals but not much of a song. It's interesting but not entirely my thing. It never seems to take off from where it started.
Another young chap who sound old. William Elliot Whitmore. I like this because the drum and the chant are the only two instruments used.
4) A bit like a Mark Lanegan track but not nearly as good a singer. I like the Chet Baker-isms on the trumpet and the strings are nicely arranged.
This is Bob Fisher with his Willard Grant Cospiracy, an ever changin' collection of musicians Personally this come from his best work.
5) More Americana, I suppose. Again, I have no idea who this might be. I don't really like this one much. It just goes to show that you can dress up a song any way you want. But Phil Alvin with just an acoustic guitar can make you look awfully silly.
Magnolia Electric Co, the last official thing they did before alcohol took their main man away
6) Wow, you don't get many songs written about Pittsburgh, PA. Kind of a Dylan and the Band type track. No one here is as talented as any of those people but this one is interesting. The problem seems to be that these folks don't know how to make a song build or how to use dynamics to make things interesting. And you better have a stellar piece of songwriting if you're going to go that route.
This is Sammy Walker and I'm still championing him. It seems my esteemded friend The Fish has been won over. I'll keep on saying it: this is the best Dylan album Bob himself never wrote.
7) Nice slide guitar work. A simple bluesy track. I like the instrumentation. Already mentioned the slide work but the fiddle, simple percussion and acoustic bass all add to the stew. I dig the drony, dragged out vocals. I would look further into this act.
Ben Weaver with El Camino Real; I suggest you look,up his Mirepoix and Smoke album.
8) This is pretty hip. Songs about pork & beans are probably only slightly more common than songs about Pittsburgh. Sort of a Black Keys simplicity folded into a ZZ Top sense of humor. This is pretty hip.
Like the Keys a guitar/drum duo. But Left Lane Cruiser usually play the Keys into third division. Rawk as Raw.
9) You gotta love the reverb drenched cheap guitar sound. The (less powerful) When The Levee Breaks style drumming is cool, too. I like this one. It does actually build to a really primitive detuned guitar solo. There are real dynamics. It's kinda weird but in a good way.
Split-off from JJ Grey's Mofro band. They'r called Greyhouds
10) I'm not sure how this fits in to the mix but it is a firm favorite of mine and I've not heard it in a while. This one got the girlfriend dancing and singing along. Joe Jackson doing Steppin' Out.
Always loved that walkin' bass in this Jackson song and wanted to couplt it on the walking guitar sounds of the next song.
11) Starts with some really nice guitar playing as the band slowly come in and fill in the sound. Dynamics - that's what I'm talking about. Unfortunately the singer kinda blows. Musically a cool track but the lyrics and vocal.s let it down.
A band from Norway called Washington.
12) A bit of 80s stylee white funk. The chorus puts me in mind of some other song and I can't place it. It drives me crazy every listen.
It's a new American band called Spanish Gold.
13) Great instrumentation again. Accordion & fiddle - you can't hardly go wrong. This one puts me in mind of Mark Lanegan again. But the "Shoot baby shoot..." chorus part breaks the song up. They just get going and then they cut to an annoying chorus part that does nothing for me. This could have been a fine record.
German artist calls himself Get Well Soon
14) Space age bachelor pad, loungey instrumentation - Vibes, drummer tapping the rim of the snare with all the right offbeats, nice production. How do you find a vibes player? There can't be that many around.
And from Belgium the band dEUS with one of their calmer efforts. I like to mix a couple of European sounds (non UK) in the disc.
15) Nice piano to open the track. Sounds like a bit from some soundtrack, perhaps. A bit classical in style and a pretty minor key melody. Nice playing all around. At around the halfway point it gets more jazzy and the pace picks up. A really nice track and a fine way to end the mix.
This is Brad Melhdau covering a Radiohead tune. It's from The Art of the Trio vol.3
So it was a bit hit and miss for me. Opened and closed with great tracks and enough good stuff in the middle that I'd like to know more about to hold my interest. Thanks much to my mixer.

Also, as a promise to all - I will be much more prompt in all things Mix Club in the coming months.
Last edited by Walk In My Shadow on 18 Sep 2014, 09:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 17 Sep 2014, 19:35

01. Phil Alvin – Next week sometime
02. John Fullbright – Gawd above
03. William Elliott Whitmore – Mutiny
04. Willard Grant Conspiracy – Lost hours
05. Magnolia Electric Co – O! Grace
06. Sammy Walker – Cold Pittsburgh morning
07. Ben Weaver – El Camino blues
08. Left Lane Cruiser – Pork ’n beans
09. Greyhounds – Yours to steal
10. Joe Jackson – Steppin’ out
11. Washington – Vaults
12. Spanish Gold – Out on the street
13. Get Well Soon – If this hat is missing
14. dEUS – Nothing really ends
15. Brad Mehldau – Exit music (for a film)
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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby The Fish » 27 Sep 2014, 09:20

Although I was let down on a mix from my assigned mixer, Bhoywonder stepped in and provided this by way of a trial run of the new upload process, prior to rejoining. No need to provide a track listing as it was tagged throughout, but enjoyable for the most part all the same...


1) Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Funeral Pyres

I like a lot of African music, but mainly South African jive or West African funk.
There are a few random others, but unfortunately much of the remainder sounds like either
a castrated goatherd (worse still a castrated goat!) or an amateur gamelan orchestra
playing prog. This I just found dull. I don't doubt that it is "worthy", it is so
beard-strokingly worthy it should come with a free signed photo of Andy Kershaw
reading The Guardian, but alas it ain't for me

2) Bonnie Prince Billy - Love Comes To Me

The next run of four however nestles right into my comfort zone.
You could argue that maybe Will Oldham is maybe a tad too prolific, but the
quality is usually high.

3) Bon Iver - Re: Stacks

Continuing in the beardy neo folk vein.....

4) June Carter Cash - Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone

In Johnny's shadow a lot of course but she really was great in her own right.
I love that this later recording like Johnny's American recordings, shows a lot
of frailties, but is similarly all the more poignant and resonant for it.

5) Bob Dylan - Percy's Song

Like everyone else I suppose I knew the Fairport version first,
but it was great when this got released.

6) Tinariwen - 63

Oh great I now have two pictures of Andy Kershaw :D

7) Simon and Garfunkel - Sunporch cha-cha-cha

From The Graduate soundtrack it seems. Pleasant enough 60s lounge vibe but
often have misgivings about film scores out of context.

8) Ska Cubano - Istanbul (Not Constantinople)

I know this from the They Might Be Giants version of course. This was a whole lot of fun.

9) Lightnin' Hopkins - Open Up Your Door

My favourite Blues is the really visceral stuff, Wolf and Elmore etc,
but I always have time for Sam Hopkins. If you are going to play a
basic blues template then this is sure as hell the way to do it.
Enjoyed this one a lot.

10) Caetano Veloso - O Leazinho

I rubbished a Veloso track when voting in the 60s cup, but even then
commented that I like some that I had heard. This one is rather pleasant.

11) Patsy Cline - You Belong To Me

How many versions of this song do I own ? Classic for a reason and sung by Patsy
What's not to love ?

12) Josh Rouse - Quiet Town

I burned this mix to CD to listen to it straight through as a mix, and this was the one
that made me stop and think who is this again, it's great.
Have just about all the CDs so a timely reminder that I should play Josh a bit more.

13) Nina SImone - Let It Be Me

As with the Patsy above. Classic song, great singer, perfection

14) SImon and Garfunkel - Bridge Over Troubled Water

Live version. Art's voice really is something sublime at times.

15) Washington Phillips - Lift Him Up That's All

Now this really is something special

Thanks Paul and welcome back
We're way past rhubarb

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby bhoywonder » 29 Sep 2014, 08:19

The Fish wrote: 1) Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan - Funeral Pyres

I like a lot of African music, but mainly South African jive or West African funk.
There are a few random others, but unfortunately much of the remainder sounds like either
a castrated goatherd (worse still a castrated goat!) or an amateur gamelan orchestra
playing prog. This I just found dull. I don't doubt that it is "worthy", it is so
beard-strokingly worthy it should come with a free signed photo of Andy Kershaw
reading The Guardian, but alas it ain't for me

Africa? Ha! You big dafty. Even the name should tell you this is Asia ;-) Nusrat is, of course, the king of Qwaali, the sufi from Pakistan. I saw a bunch of his protegees live last year and it was one of the best shows I’d seen in years. Possibly doesn’t translate so well in 3-minutes on the headphones.

Africa…dear oh dear…

The Fish wrote: 2) Bonnie Prince Billy - Love Comes To Me

The next run of four however nestles right into my comfort zone.
You could argue that maybe Will Oldham is maybe a tad too prolific, but the
quality is usually high.


I often think he can’t have a new record out already, and then get it, and it’s great. Neat trick. I guess he’s no more prolific than most acts were ‘back in the day’…

The Fish wrote:
4) June Carter Cash - Will You Miss Me When I'm Gone

In Johnny's shadow a lot of course but she really was great in her own right.
I love that this later recording like Johnny's American recordings, shows a lot
of frailties, but is similarly all the more poignant and resonant for it.

I can recommend the album this comes from – Wildwood Flower, which was produced by John Cash and features Johnny and members of the Carter/Cash family. I think it was recorded at home, and it’s all AP Carter songs, pretty much. A very fond farewell, if you like.

The Fish wrote:5) Bob Dylan - Percy's Song

Like everyone else I suppose I knew the Fairport version first,
but it was great when this got released.


I never heard the Fairport version. Is it good?
The Fish wrote:
6) Tinariwen - 63

Oh great I now have two pictures of Andy Kershaw :D


And there was me thinking you liked the blues ;-)

The Fish wrote:7) Simon and Garfunkel - Sunporch cha-cha-cha

From The Graduate soundtrack it seems. Pleasant enough 60s lounge vibe but
often have misgivings about film scores out of context.


It’s utter rubbish, but made me laugh.

The Fish wrote: 8) Ska Cubano - Istanbul (Not Constantinople)

I know this from the They Might Be Giants version of course. This was a whole lot of fun.


If you ever get the chance to see these live, don’t miss it!

The Fish wrote:
9) Lightnin' Hopkins - Open Up Your Door

My favourite Blues is the really visceral stuff, Wolf and Elmore etc,
but I always have time for Sam Hopkins. If you are going to play a
basic blues template then this is sure as hell the way to do it.
Enjoyed this one a lot.


This is interesting. It’s from his late-60s Freeform Patterns album, which he recorded live in the studio with the bass player and drummer from 13th Floor Elevators. They had taken acid, he was swigging moonshine, and the engineer left the tapes rolling. Amazingly, it worked. I can strongly recommend the album.

The Fish wrote:
14) SImon and Garfunkel - Bridge Over Troubled Water

Live version. Art's voice really is something sublime at times.

What I find remarkable about this, is that it was recoded live before the album had come out – possibly before they’d recorded it. So, at the start, you hear them introducing a new song… Must have been amazing to hear it first like this. Such a shame they stuck all those bells and whistles on it, because like this, it’s beautiful.
The Fish wrote:15) Washington Phillips - Lift Him Up That's All

Now this really is something special

Isn’t it? It’s off that Goodbye Babylon boxset of pre-war gospel. A wonderful thing. Nobody knows what instrument Phillips is playing, here, which is nice!

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Re: July/August 2014 Reviews

Postby The Fish » 29 Sep 2014, 18:20

D'oh. A bit of a geographical senior moment there, but then again..........

We're way past rhubarb