May/June Reviews

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whodathunkit
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May/June Reviews

Postby whodathunkit » 20 May 2014, 15:56

Been a long time since I was first off. Anyway this months/quarters mix was a beaut. Obviously someone's warming up for the Blues/Jazz/Soul Cup. Possibly the current title holder ;) .

1. Big brass and tinkling piano. Some guy loves a girl named Rita. "When she kisses it's like salt-petre". Philip Larkin couldn't beat that. Big old sexy sax break. Nice start.
2. Short, sweet bluesy instumental with rather understated guitar lead. Keep them coming.
3. Irma Thomas and "You Can Have My Husband". Have to say I prefer the Koko Taylor version. Irma doesn't really sound like she means it.
4. Great little cajun/New Orleans style number. Love the shuffling, swaggering, stuttering feel of it.
5. Best thing on here. This grabs you by the balls from the start and keeps squeezing for the whole 2 minutes 28. "Bottle it up and go". Should be on prescription.
6. Need a break after that and here's a nice cool jazz piece. No idea who but it was short/long enough to satisfy my tiny jazz attention span.
7. Another cracker. Slinky soul number. Some guy praising his woman's abilty to cook chicken (and I don't think it's a euphemism :oops: )
8. JB Lenoir's "Talk To Your Daughter". I think it's the man himself although it sounds sorta different to the version I own. Probably a digitizing thing. Whatever, it's great.
9. Boogie-woogie Prof Longhair type piano instrumental. Nobody could not like this.
10. Strident soul horns leading in a typical Southern soul track. All the right ingredients and I really should know it.
11. Little red rooster, little green frogs, etc all demanding to rock the night. Another one I should know. Loved it despite some piss poor harmonica playing.
12. More blues. A guitar instrumental and I'm guessing Buddy Guy.
13. Back to Jazz. This one's really sharp. Biggish ensemble playing at full power. The drummer's having a particularly good time.
14. Old-time acoustic blues with, I think,a woman singing. The guitar sounds like Rosetta Tharpe although the subject matter is a trifle secular for her.
15. Has to be Big Joe Williams. Jumping blues number, Another one it's impossible not to like.
16. The great ZZ Hill and "Dream Don't Let Me Down". Wonderful.
17. Need cheering up after ZZ and this does the trick. "The House Will Rock". Group singing but the show is stolen by some sonic sax playing.
18. It's Little Johnny Taylor. I know that cos he name-checks himself :D .

Many thanks for this one. Good to the last drop. I feel a shameful reveal on it's way.

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fange
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby fange » 21 May 2014, 06:39

whodathunkit wrote:Been a long time since I was first off. Anyway this months/quarters mix was a beaut. Obviously someone's warming up for the Blues/Jazz/Soul Cup. Possibly the current title holder ;)

No, but i was close. :( Anyway, glad you enjoyed this mix.

1. Big brass and tinkling piano. Some guy loves a girl named Rita. "When she kisses it's like salt-petre". Philip Larkin couldn't beat that. Big old sexy sax break. Nice start.
Floyd Dixon here lettin’ loose in the rock and roll era on a Specialty records date, that was never released till decades later strangely. Love the lyrics too, a true showmans ability with words, would’ve been a blast live.

2. Short, sweet bluesy instumental with rather understated guitar lead. Keep them coming.
Buddy Guy working out in the studio with his band, diggin that groove. The master of understated feel.

3. Irma Thomas and "You Can Have My Husband". Have to say I prefer the Koko Taylor version. Irma doesn't really sound like she means it.
Oh, I wouldn’t have minded being Irma’s man. :) Great track, and as you say so many fine vewrsions.

4. Great little cajun/New Orleans style number. Love the shuffling, swaggering, stuttering feel of it.
Crunchy blues from a fine album - The Red Devils, doing the kick-off tune from their ‘King King’ live record from the early 90s. Got the feel and recording just right.

5. Best thing on here. This grabs you by the balls from the start and keeps squeezing for the whole 2 minutes 28. "Bottle it up and go". Should be on prescription.
A belter, huh. Big John Greer doing a mid-50s jump R&B version of the classic blues tune, from a fab collection of Groove Records tunes. Smoking guitar courtesy of one Mickey Baker, too.

6. Need a break after that and here's a nice cool jazz piece. No idea who but it was short/long enough to satisfy my tiny jazz attention span.
Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, with a gorgeous little number for the early-60s jukeboxes called ‘Blue Frenzy’. The 45 single version was a bonus track on a recent CD reish of his ‘Breaking Point’ LP.

7. Another cracker. Slinky soul number. Some guy praising his woman's abilty to cook chicken (and I don't think it's a euphemism )
No, I don’t think so either, which makes me feel slightly dirty. Long-time Blues and Soul journeyman Bobby Rush sure had an appetite, obviously.

8. JB Lenoir's "Talk To Your Daughter". I think it's the man himself although it sounds sorta different to the version I own. Probably a digitizing thing. Whatever, it's great.
Yep. It’s the version from the Chess Blues box set, love it so much.

9. Boogie-woogie Prof Longhair type piano instrumental. Nobody could not like this.
‘Nashua’ by Allen "Tousan" Toussaint, right at the beginning of his career in the late-50s, when the Longhair feel was more direct and upfront but no less wonderful. Roy Montrell’s hot guitar is a joy as well.

10. Strident soul horns leading in a typical Southern soul track. All the right ingredients and I really should know it.
Bill Coday with ‘Get Your Lie Straight’, killer Southern-fried bluesy soul. Great in every way.

11. Little red rooster, little green frogs, etc all demanding to rock the night. Another one I should know. Loved it despite some piss poor harmonica playing.
Lightnin’ Slim getting his rockin groove on with ‘Rooster Blues’, though it probably could have been Animal Kingdom Blues :)
The Baron will not be happy with your description of Lazy Lester’s harp skills I’m guessing!


12. More blues. A guitar instrumental and I'm guessing Buddy Guy.
The iceman, Albert Collins, with one of his ‘60s club groovers.from the ‘Truckin’ With…’ set.

13. Back to Jazz. This one's really sharp. Biggish ensemble playing at full power. The drummer's having a particularly good time.
Oh yeah, Art Blakey was renowned for it, the ultimate leave-nothing-in-the-tank showman and skin pounder. This is him and the Jazz Messengers from’61 doing the big and bluesy ‘Down Under’.

14. Old-time acoustic blues with, I think,a woman singing. The guitar sounds like Rosetta Tharpe although the subject matter is a trifle secular for her.
Another singing Sister here, Sister O.M. Terrell, proclaiming the evils of gambling. Love the guitar and her voice, so simple but wonderful.

15. Has to be Big Joe Williams. Jumping blues number, Another one it's impossible not to like.
It is a Big Joe, but this is the Turner variety mate! Some lascivious jump blues from one of the great masters of the style, and his bands were always fucking killer.

16. The great ZZ Hill and "Dream Don't Let Me Down". Wonderful.
I adore this song, written by Fred Hughes and done beautifully by ZZ and group.

17. Need cheering up after ZZ and this does the trick. "The House Will Rock". Group singing but the show is stolen by some sonic sax playing.
The wild Trenier boys here, doing what they did so well for those short few years when they were sending people crazy on the post WWII dancefloors. This is one of their ’52 tunes for Okeh records, and if you don’t have this set you should, Bob…
Image

18. It's Little Johnny Taylor. I know that cos he name-checks himself .
It IS Litle Johnny Taylor, one of my favourite blues-meets-soul singers of the early-60s. He even name-checks one of his earlier hits, “I don’t need a ‘Part Time Love’ no more’. Nothing like self-advertising. :)

Many thanks for this one. Good to the last drop. I feel a shameful reveal on it's way.
Always a pleasure, mate, it was good to just let loose with some personal faves. Glad it hit the spot!

Blues for Bob
1. Floyd Dixon – Rita
2. Buddy Guy – Untitled Instrumental
3. Irma Thomas – Don’t Mess With My Man
4. The Red Devils – Automatic
5. Big John Greer – Bottle It Up And Go
6. Freddie Hubbard – Blue Frenzy [45 take]
7. Bobby Rush – Chicken Heads
8. JB Lenoir – Mama Talk To Your Daughter
9. Allen Toussaint – Nashua
10. Bill Coday – Get Your Lie Straight
11. Lightnin’ Slim – Rooster Blues
12. Albert Collins – Frosty
13. Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Down Under
14. Sister O.M. Terrell – The Gambling Man
15. Big Joe Turner – Adam Bit The Apple
16. Z.Z. Hill – Dream Don’t Let Me Down
17. The Treniers – Rocking On Sunday Night
18. Little Johnny Taylor – You Win, I Lose
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Nick Danger
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Nick Danger » 22 May 2014, 15:34

My mix this month was my first theme mix, cleverly titled Discover America with Nick Danger, a takeoff on a Firesign Theatre title from which my name comes from. The songs all deal with geographical places in the U.S. Normally the rub about themes is that the music can suffer due to trying to fit the songs to the theme but in this case it's a quality mix throughout. I knew some of the songs but that didn't detract at all from the listening experience.

Track 1 - Old timey sounding, jaunty, tune about Carolina and mentioning my area, Raleigh. Good playing and nice energy, a good start to the mix and theme.

Track 2 - A version of Spanish Harlem. A female voice I don't recognize, slow and pretty, nice background vocals and a great arrangement. I like this.

Track 3 - Almost spoken word singing, Todd Snider-like with acoustic guitar accompaniement. The lyrics are pretty risque with lines about oral sex and a lost opportunity with a girl. It may be Snider as I've only heard a couple of his songs. Entertaining.

Track 4 - This is one I know, Magictown by The Vogues. I have their greatest hits cd and I like four or five songs from it, this one included. It might be too easy listening for some but my eclecticism runs through the EL neighborhood sometimes. Good harmonies, production, and arrangement.

Track 5 - Another one I know and I'm delighted to see it show up. It's Gene Pitney with Last Chance To Turn Around. I'm a Gene fanboy and it's always good to see his songs show up on mix club submitted by someone other than me. Great singing, good song, love it.

Track 6 - I know this too, Talk To Me Of Mendocino by the McGarrigle Sisters. Beautifully sung with that sister harmony thing. Even though I know these last three songs I subscribe to the Beenieman philosophy that says a familiar song in new context is a new and worthwhile listening experience.

Track 7 - Jazzy, Louis Armstrong type voice, not sure it's him but the horns are great as are the tasteful brushes on the drums. I'm also a jazz fan and I like this a lot.

Track 8 - Electric Blues now, also a genre I like. It's a version of I Left My Heart In San Francisco, definitely not by Tony Bennett. The voice sounds familiar. It's nice to hear another version of this song. Good selection.

Track 9 - Something from the 30's or 40's I think, a great little vocal group number. Sounds like the Mills Brothers or the Ink Spots or a similar group. I like this a lot. I might have to buy whatever album this is from. Good stuff!

Track 10 - A song about Cheyenne Indians traveling in Chryslers across America. It's a spoken word piece with a female lead. The lyrics are interesting but there's not enough going on musically for me. Not a fan of strictly spoken word songs normally.

Track 11 - Interesting, atmospheric, old and traditional sounding song about traveling the Navaho Trail. Connects nicely with the previous song. I like the wind effects and the general production. I like this.

Track 12 - I don't know the song but it sounds like the Shangri-las. I am a fan of girl groups and they had their own distinctive sound and Mary Weiss was a unique talent. The variety of musical styles on this mix is pretty wide and that is very much ok with me.

Track 13 - Another case in point as we're now in the Jump Blues arena. A fun instrumental kinda Louis Jordan like with great horns. Really nice.

Track 14 - A Country tune, old Country, real Country, my kind of Country. Love this, steel guitar, great playing. The voice sounds familiar but I have no idea who it is. I need to buy this album if I don't already have it.

Track 15 - Is this Nina Simone? I probably own this and I think it's her but I'm not sure. Very enjoyable whoever it is.

Track 16 - Still another genre, this time Rockabilly. It sounds like it's from the 50's. The voice is very familiar but it's not coming to me. I don't like all Rockabilly but I like this. Good choice.

Track 17 - This one is interesting. It starts out as a fairly straight version of Woody Guthrie's This Land Is Your Land and I have no clue who it is. About halfway through the lyrics leave Woody and goes into a spoken word section that talks about Mojo World and then I realize it must be Mojo Nixon. He's one of my favorite psychobilly artists. I'm not sure what Woody would think but I like it. Another good one.

Track 18 - And we end our U.S. trip in New Orleans with an instrumental version of When The Saints Go Marching In. Great playing, love the horns and strings, very orchestral with a great arrangement.

Great job mixer! I enjoyed the theme and it was an enjoyable listen thoughout. It covered a lot of ground musically but as I'm eclectic to a fault that was fine to me. Thank you.

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Rayge
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Rayge » 23 May 2014, 20:07

My mix this month was my first theme mix, cleverly titled Discover America with Nick Danger, a takeoff on a Firesign Theatre title from which my name comes from. The songs all deal with geographical places in the U.S. Normally the rub about themes is that the music can suffer due to trying to fit the songs to the theme but in this case it's a quality mix throughout. I knew some of the songs but that didn't detract at all from the listening experience.

Track 1 - Old timey sounding, jaunty, tune about Carolina and mentioning my area, Raleigh. Good playing and nice energy, a good start to the mix and theme.
This vaguely cajun version of the Chuck Berry tune is quite well known in the UK, after DJ Charlie Gillett picked it up and promoted it on his roots radio show in the early 1970s. I know nothing about the singer, Johnnie Allan
Track 2 - A version of Spanish Harlem. A female voice I don't recognize, slow and pretty, nice background vocals and a great arrangement. I like this.
Laura Nyro and Labelle from her 1971 album Gonna take a Miracle. One of the things I didn't get around to mentioning in my long Laura thread on YY was how well she varied tempo for emotional effect, either recasting an old song, or switching time signatures several times within one song
Track 3 - Almost spoken word singing, Todd Snider-like with acoustic guitar accompaniment. The lyrics are pretty risque with lines about oral sex and a lost opportunity with a girl. It may be Snider as I've only heard a couple of his songs. Entertaining.
The Chelsea Hotel Oral Sex Song by Jeffrey Lewis, released about a decade ago. I think Lewis is wonderful, and this song, which changes directions several times and eventually becomes something else entirely
Track 4 - This is one I know, Magictown by The Vogues. I have their greatest hits cd and I like four or five songs from it, this one included. It might be too easy listening for some but my eclecticism runs through the EL neighborhood sometimes. Good harmonies, production, and arrangement.
Glad you like it: I got the impression from some of your other posts that you're not averse to a bit of quality US pop from the 60s, hence this and the next track
Track 5 - Another one I know and I'm delighted to see it show up. It's Gene Pitney with Last Chance To Turn Around. I'm a Gene fanboy and it's always good to see his songs show up on mix club submitted by someone other than me. Great singing, good song, love it.
I like it, too, even though I was baffled for a few years – before Last Exit to Brooklyn was published – by what exactly a 'last taxi' was, and why he was getting so emotional about it (we didn't have those roadsigns in the UK)
Track 6 - I know this too, Talk To Me Of Mendocino by the McGarrigle Sisters. Beautifully sung with that sister harmony thing. Even though I know these last three songs I subscribe to the Beenieman philosophy that says a familiar song in new context is a new and worthwhile listening experience.
It was this or California Dreaming...
Track 7 - Jazzy, Louis Armstrong type voice, not sure it's him but the horns are great as are the tasteful brushes on the drums. I'm also a jazz fan and I like this a lot.
I read that you were a fan of Closing Time Tom Waits and thought you might like this one: Jack & Neal / California Here I Come from foregin affairs. I know what you mean about the voice, but I can't imagine Lewis singing those lyrics about fucking nurses
Track 8 - Electric Blues now, also a genre I like. It's a version of I Left My Heart In San Francisco, definitely not by Tony Bennett. The voice sounds familiar. It's nice to hear another version of this song. Good selection.
This is John Lee Hooker, and it's not I Left My Heart In San Francisco: it's San Francisco Blues, written by John Lee Hooker. Yeah, the words are similar, but in a different order. A wonderful – and as yet the only one I know off, of a black bluesman ripping off a white songwriter – that I found on the B-side of a Hooker single in the British blues boom
Track 9 - Something from the 30's or 40's I think, a great little vocal group number. Sounds like the Mills Brothers or the Ink Spots or a similar group. I like this a lot. I might have to buy whatever album this is from. Good stuff!
Yes, it's the Mills Brothers with the spectacularly politically incorrect Across the Alley from the Alamo. It's on their greatest hits CD
Track 10 - A song about Cheyenne Indians traveling in Chryslers across America. It's a spoken word piece with a female lead. The lyrics are interesting but there's not enough going on musically for me. Not a fan of strictly spoken word songs normally.
I didn't realize that she doesn't break into song on thi: I just get mesmerised by the guitar lines. It's Mo Tucker, with Sterling Morrison on guitar
Track 11 - Interesting, atmospheric, old and traditional sounding song about traveling the Navaho Trail. Connects nicely with the previous song. I like the wind effects and the general production. I like this.
It's Mike Nesmith, from his 1977 album, From a Radio Engine to a Photon Wing. He really uses sound effects well, especially in his mid-1970s albums
Track 12 - I don't know the song but it sounds like the Shangri-las. I am a fan of girl groups and they had their own distinctive sound and Mary Weiss was a unique talent. The variety of musical styles on this mix is pretty wide and that is very much ok with me.
There's no hiding Mary, is there? This is a later single, The Train from Kansas City.


I'm having computer trouble, so I thought I'd post this before I lost it. I'll be back with part two soon :)
In timeless moments we live forever

You can't play a tune on an absolute

When the ball sleeps it dreams it is a Frisbee

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will

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Rayge
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Rayge » 24 May 2014, 17:17

Track 13 - Another case in point as we're now in the Jump Blues arena. A fun instrumental kinda Louis Jordan like with great horns. Really nice.
This is the Dave Bartholomew band representing New Orleans with Basin Street Breakdown
Track 14 - A Country tune, old Country, real Country, my kind of Country. Love this, steel guitar, great playing. The voice sounds familiar but I have no idea who it is. I need to buy this album if I don't already have it.
Heading north via Tennessee Borders by Hank Williams. Not one I'm particularly familiar with, but the title leaped out at me
Track 15 - Is this Nina Simone? I probably own this and I think it's her but I'm not sure. Very enjoyable whoever it is.
Memphis in June by Nina, yes, from my favourite of her albums, Forbidden Fruit. There was a track from the this on the mix I made for Fandango.
Track 16 - Still another genre, this time Rockabilly. It sounds like it's from the 50's. The voice is very familiar but it's not coming to me. I don't like all Rockabilly but I like this. Good choice.
I'd have thought the pounding piano would have given the game away. It's Jerry Lee Lewis with Deep Elem Blues, cut for Sun in the rock & roll years, but as far as I know not released on a single
Track 17 - This one is interesting. It starts out as a fairly straight version of Woody Guthrie's This Land Is Your Land and I have no clue who it is. About halfway through the lyrics leave Woody and goes into a spoken word section that talks about Mojo World and then I realize it must be Mojo Nixon. He's one of my favorite psychobilly artists. I'm not sure what Woody would think but I like it. Another good one.
I think he would have loved it! Mojo is one of the most political of artists, an arch utopian anarchist who's written some great songs about money, censorship and so on in amongst the raucous, toad-licking booze and mushrooms stuff, while some of his more recent albums include, alongside the obligatory songs about his penis and that fine tribute to Diana, Princes of Wales, 'Drunk Divorced Floozie', some really affecting stuff about losing youthful fire (check out When did I Become My dad?)
Track 18 - And we end our U.S. trip in New Orleans with an instrumental version of When The Saints Go Marching In. Great playing, love the horns and strings, very orchestral with a great arrangement.
Well, Saints isn't the only tune in there; there's a few classic American songs: it's Discover America by the only British band on the tape, The Penguin Cafe Orchestra
Great job mixer! I enjoyed the theme and it was an enjoyable listen thoughout. It covered a lot of ground musically but as I'm eclectic to a fault that was fine to me. Thank you.
It was a pleasure. Glad you liked it

Track list:
1 Johnnie Allan - Promised Land
2 Laura Nyro - Spanish Harlem
3 Jeffrey Lewis - The Chelsea Hotel Oral Sex Song
4 Vogues - Magic Town
5 Gene Pitney - Last Chance to Turn Around
6 McGarrigle Sisters - Talk to Me of Mendocino
7 Tom Waits - Jack and Neal / California Here I Come
8 John Lee Hooker - San Francisco Blues
9 The Mills Brothers - Across the Alley from the Alamo
10 Mo Tucker - Blue, All the Way to Canada
11 Mike Nesmith - Navajo Trail
12 Shangri-Las - The Train from Kansas City
13 Dave Bartholomew - Basin Street Breakdown
14 Hank Williams - Tennessee Borders
15 Nina Simone - Memphis in June
16 Jerry Lee Lewis - Deep Elem Blues
17 Mojo Nixon & Skid Roper - This Land is Your Land
18 Penguin Cafe Orchestra - Discover America
In timeless moments we live forever

You can't play a tune on an absolute

When the ball sleeps it dreams it is a Frisbee

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will

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Rayge
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Rayge » 30 May 2014, 19:13

Apologies to whoever sent my mix, but I'm having a bit of trouble with my player at the moment, so can't give the review the full attention it deserves. Will do as soon as I can.
In timeless moments we live forever

You can't play a tune on an absolute

When the ball sleeps it dreams it is a Frisbee

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will

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T. Willy Rye
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby T. Willy Rye » 31 May 2014, 19:02

My mixer this month is obviously pretty knowledgeable about formatting and relabeling mp3 tracks. I will need tips. This person also has a pretty deep collection of music.

Track 1 When the harp comes in shortly after the start I grow a little concerned; it makes me think of the early 90s and bands I'd rather not recall. The pissed off female vocals rescue it though. I've listened to the Detroit Cobras on a very cursory level, but this track makes think of them. I like it.

Track 2 is right in my wheelhouse. 70s soul that has smoking organ, strong percussion, and that geetar is outta sight. Feel like I should know it, but I'll be damned if I do. Looking forward to the reveal.

Track 3 I suppose I should just give over to this joyous jazzworldbeatsouleasylistening mish mash. But it's hard for me. The musicianship is certainly there; just a little too much cheese. I know it was the 70s and people didn't take themselves so seriously back then. I'm coming around.

Track 4 Another great soul pick. “Plastic Lady” there seemed to be a significant concern with artifice expressed by the early 70s soulsters. I recently got a Numero release and there's a pretty killer cut called “Phoney People” and then of course there's the Temps “Plastic Man.” Looking forward to the reveal.

Track 5 is a nice little soul jazz workout. Nothing mind blowing, but stone cold solid. Love the horns inpterplay with the rhythm section.

Track 6 Pleasant little contemporary soul number. That female voice sure sounds familiar. I'm wondering if I really recognize it or if it's just kind of generic for 21st century female soul singing- smoky sultry season with one part vamp and a healthy measure of hard knock wisdom. Let simmer.

Track 7 More contemporary soul singing with a track that is more sparse and less typical. The music sounds more like 80s pop forays in a spartan almost Celtic area. The voice is nice, but this one will prolly not hold my interest.

Track 8 I think I've heard this singer before on an earlier mix. I said she sounded like Chan Marshall, but it turned out the be The Unthanks- so that's my guess. I suppose if I lived in a dreary old place I could take comfort that this band was right there with me, but I ain't got time for this kinda misery.

Track 9 Finally one I know. “Black Wonders of the World” by Billy Paul. Man, I love his voice and that guitar (particularly around the 3 minute mark) is just about perfect.

Track 10 is sort of a contemporary retro hybrid that blends rock, jazz, and maybe country swing. I'm generally in favor of such things as can be attested by my propensity to put Eilen Jewell tracks on far too many of my mixes. This singer possesses more soul than Ms. Jewell. I like it.

Track 11 Motown girl group track that I don't recognize. I think it's impossible not to like this stuff.

Track 12 is a blues track that is a little past my blues expiration date. I'm not a fan of the over the top, look-at-me-guitar licks. Sorry.

Track 13 is Mickey Murray with Shout Bamalama. A little more familiar with Otis's version, but this is great!

Track 14 I should probably know the voice here, but I bet it was a lot better 30 years before this recording or at least his band was more exciting.

Track 15 I like this one. Very bouncy and groovy despite the darker lyrics. Another one I will be eager to hear the reveal to.

Thank you mixer! 9 I really like only about 4 I don't!

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Walk In My Shadow
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 03 Jun 2014, 21:29

Hello, it's me.

My mixer this month is obviously pretty knowledgeable about formatting and relabeling mp3 tracks. I will need tips.
You'll have to ask The Fish. He did that for me.

This person also has a pretty deep collection of music.

Track 1 When the harp comes in shortly after the start I grow a little concerned; it makes me think of the early 90s and bands I'd rather not recall. The pissed off female vocals rescue it though. I've listened to the Detroit Cobras on a very cursory level, but this track makes think of them. I like it.

Very recent. JD Wilkes & the Dirt Daubers. That's Colonel Wilkes of the Legendary Shack Shakers' new band with his wife doing the vocals.

Track 2 is right in my wheelhouse. 70s soul that has smoking organ, strong percussion, and that geetar is outta sight. Feel like I should know it, but I'll be damned if I do. Looking forward to the reveal.

A recent discovery for me. Black Heat with a tune called The Jungle.

Track 3 I suppose I should just give over to this joyous jazzworldbeatsouleasylistening mish mash. But it's hard for me. The musicianship is certainly there; just a little too much cheese. I know it was the 70s and people didn't take themselves so seriously back then. I'm coming around.

Another early 70's funk band The Sidewinders. Only made one album, I believe.

Track 4 Another great soul pick. “Plastic Lady” there seemed to be a significant concern with artifice expressed by the early 70s soulsters. I recently got a Numero release and there's a pretty killer cut called “Phoney People” and then of course there's the Temps “Plastic Man.” Looking forward to the reveal.

And yet another obscure band. This one is called Gold.

Track 5 is a nice little soul jazz workout. Nothing mind blowing, but stone cold solid. Love the horns inpterplay with the rhythm section.

More recent funk from the Third Coast Kings.

Track 6 Pleasant little contemporary soul number. That female voice sure sounds familiar. I'm wondering if I really recognize it or if it's just kind of generic for 21st century female soul singing- smoky sultry season with one part vamp and a healthy measure of hard knock wisdom. Let simmer.

Dojo Cuts ft Roxie Ray. Australian if I'm not mistaken. Slow groove, isn't it?

Track 7 More contemporary soul singing with a track that is more sparse and less typical. The music sounds more like 80s pop forays in a spartan almost Celtic area. The voice is nice, but this one will prolly not hold my interest.

English songstress Josephine from her debut. A very fine album on the whole.It's called Portrait and I love it.

Track 8 I think I've heard this singer before on an earlier mix. I said she sounded like Chan Marshall, but it turned out the be The Unthanks- so that's my guess. I suppose if I lived in a dreary old place I could take comfort that this band was right there with me, but I ain't got time for this kinda misery.

I took a chance here. It's Dangermouse ft Sparklehorse. Maybe I shouldn't have, it was the last track I chose.

Track 9 Finally one I know. “Black Wonders of the World” by Billy Paul. Man, I love his voice and that guitar (particularly around the 3 minute mark) is just about perfect.

Yes. I thought this was so un-Billy Paul that I needed to use it.

Track 10 is sort of a contemporary retro hybrid that blends rock, jazz, and maybe country swing. I'm generally in favor of such things as can be attested by my propensity to put Eilen Jewell tracks on far too many of my mixes. This singer possesses more soul than Ms. Jewell. I like it.

New Soul from a Spanish band called the Excitements. Singer looks like Tina.

Track 11 Motown girl group track that I don't recognize. I think it's impossible not to like this stuff.

Another recent Spanish band the Pepper Pots that do the old girl groups rather nice.

Track 12 is a blues track that is a little past my blues expiration date. I'm not a fan of the over the top, look-at-me-guitar licks. Sorry.

Yeah, I get you. Johnny Winter.

Track 13 is Mickey Murray with Shout Bamalama. A little more familiar with Otis's version, but this is great!

Indeed. Taken off the Otis tribute record.

Track 14 I should probably know the voice here, but I bet it was a lot better 30 years before this recording or at least his band was more exciting.

It's a demo track from his later unhappy period. It's Eddie Hinton whom I love dearly.

Track 15 I like this one. Very bouncy and groovy despite the darker lyrics. Another one I will be eager to hear the reveal to.

Well. Thelma "Don't leave me this way" Houston. From her MoWest album that I discovered also recently.

Thank you mixer! 9 I really like only about 4 I don't!

Nine ain't bad! I'll settle for that anytime!



01. JD Wilkes & the Dirt Daubers – No rest for the wicked
02. Black Heat – The jungle
03. The Sidewinders – I like to dance
04. Gold – Plastic lady
05. Third Coast Kings – Come on
06. Dojo Cuts – I can give
07. Josephine – I pray that I move
08. Danger Mouse – Every time I’m with you
09. Billy Paul – Black wonders of the world
10. The Excitements – Don’t you dare tell her
11. The Pepper Pots – I won’t say I love you
12. Johnny Winter – Boot hill
13. Mickey Murray – Shout bamalama
14. Eddie Hinton – Good love is hard to find
15. Thelma Houston – Black California
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby fange » 09 Jun 2014, 11:56

Been digging this compact but very tasty mix for a week or so now, and my mystery mixer knows my number and probably my address and email too.

1. A lovely old acoustic blues from the scratchy old days, sanctified blues with plenty of the church in the delivery from the singer though what I get from the lyrics about ‘ham bones’ seems very secular.

2. Eddie Boyd doing his stone-classic ‘Five Long Years’; was on my JB&S long list, but is just too deep and gritty for most of the BCB cognicenti.

3. A wonderful piano trio here, from the sound of the production we’re probably talking ‘50’s, or maybe earlier, but there’s a definite hard bop flavor to the material that makes me think ‘50s. Very reminiscent of Silver’s trio work, gorgeous melodies and locked-tight rhythm section. Excellent.

4. Latin groovefest with big horns and more cowbell. What’s not to love? 1960’s maybe, the arrangements are tight as hell and sound is full and expansive. Great.

5. A long loping jazz-funk workout that is full of tasty goodness. Wicked sax and guitars. Killer.

6. Some countrified deep soul with a slow, funky base. Lovely.

7. Organ, guitar and sax jazz-funk that is right up my alley. A simple basic bluesy theme, very familiar. A bulls-eye with me, every time.

8. A really cool Latin burner, lots of shakers and percussion mixing with the bouncing bass, horns and light Afro-style guitar. Great.

9. Love this one, ‘Silly Savage’ from the Keb Darge deep funk disc. I live for this shit.

10. More Latin, more goodness. ‘I love ya!’

11. The stone-classic ‘Holy Thursday’, always a joy to hear, been a while since I’ve played my Axelrod discs.

12. And another classic, Zapp’s ‘More Bounce To The Ounce’ to finish up. Loved it back when it came out, still love it now.

Cheers mixer, you the man.
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Duncan
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Duncan » 15 Jun 2014, 22:36

fangedango! wrote:Been digging this compact but very tasty mix for a week or so now, and my mystery mixer knows my number and probably my address and email too.

1. A lovely old acoustic blues from the scratchy old days, sanctified blues with plenty of the church in the delivery from the singer though what I get from the lyrics about ‘ham bones’ seems very secular.

2. Eddie Boyd doing his stone-classic ‘Five Long Years’; was on my JB&S long list, but is just too deep and gritty for most of the BCB cognicenti.

3. A wonderful piano trio here, from the sound of the production we’re probably talking ‘50’s, or maybe earlier, but there’s a definite hard bop flavor to the material that makes me think ‘50s. Very reminiscent of Silver’s trio work, gorgeous melodies and locked-tight rhythm section. Excellent.

4. Latin groovefest with big horns and more cowbell. What’s not to love? 1960’s maybe, the arrangements are tight as hell and sound is full and expansive. Great.

5. A long loping jazz-funk workout that is full of tasty goodness. Wicked sax and guitars. Killer.

6. Some countrified deep soul with a slow, funky base. Lovely.

7. Organ, guitar and sax jazz-funk that is right up my alley. A simple basic bluesy theme, very familiar. A bulls-eye with me, every time.

8. A really cool Latin burner, lots of shakers and percussion mixing with the bouncing bass, horns and light Afro-style guitar. Great.

9. Love this one, ‘Silly Savage’ from the Keb Darge deep funk disc. I live for this shit.

10. More Latin, more goodness. ‘I love ya!’

11. The stone-classic ‘Holy Thursday’, always a joy to hear, been a while since I’ve played my Axelrod discs.

12. And another classic, Zapp’s ‘More Bounce To The Ounce’ to finish up. Loved it back when it came out, still love it now.

Cheers mixer, you the man.


How do, this was mine. Glad you liked it. I'm just finishing off my own review, so I'll sort you out with a reveal tomorrow. However, I have just remembered that I said the same to Yves ages ago and still haven't done it. So I'll do both tomorrow and then go sit on the Mix Club naughty step for a while.
Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb...

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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Duncan » 15 Jun 2014, 22:50

POW!

1. Recentish indie stuff (one would assume, possibly incorrectly) with big krautrock influences. The chugging bass, unflappable vocals and synthy flourishes all sound great. Obviously it's fairly derivative, but they're spot on and it sounds great. Top start.

2. This sounds like 90s pop-punk. I've got loads of time for this kind of thing. It's daft and prickly and fun and reminds me of my teenage years. Two minutes well spent. Ta.

3. Fun time disco! Yes please. I feel like this must have been a pretty big hit, but I'm not entirely sure what it is. The track does sound very familiar although I'm not sure if that's because I've heard it lots of times, if I'm confusing it with something else, or it was sampled by someone else. Anyway, regardless, I love it to bits. It sounds quite late for disco, so I think were probably just straying in to the 80s. Great funky bass, too.

4. A bit of indie dance punk now. Not the kind of thing you'd expect to encounter on a BCB mix but I'm rather pleased it's here. Big chorus, lots of pop hooks, and some more groovy bass. I'd be pretty interested to investigate these guys further. There are similar bands that go bad pretty quickly, or have very patchy albums, but in the context of this disc, it sounds great.

5. I'm certainly a big fan of this kind of thing in general but this particular track seems to wander a bit too close to Jools Holland World Music territory. It's pleasant enough, and I like how fluttery it is, but there's something in the production (and possibly the saxophone) that keeps me at arms length.

6. Ah, this one I know, it's Joe Tex. Great, throbbing beat, although there does seem to be more than a little bit of Rock Your Baby in there. And obviously there's the lyrics that seem somewhat, um, dated. His voice still sounds great though.

7. Electroclash time. No idea what this is but it's freakin' great. A menacing bassline, some sneery, punky vocals and some random electronic knob-twiddling all make for a enjoyable three minutes. It really takes off toward the end, too. Will definitely check these guys out.

8. After track 7, this takes a while to sink in, but when it gets there it's a blast. I love the big arrangements, the horn blasts and the fiery vocals. I'm not prepared speculate as to its origins, other than a vaguely non-committal 'latin', but I'm definitely curious to find out more about its story.

9. Ah, now then, he's something I haven't heard for a while. From the intro I thought it might be early Orbital but then I cleverly deduced from the lyrics that this is in fact LFO. I adore electronica from this period. Bits are a slightly dated, but I still love that tinny drum sound. Smashin'.

10. Another massive change in direction. Probably by about 60 years and 4000 miles. I like my blues to be pre-war, crackly and world-weary, so this is right up my street. I do tend to get most of these guys mixed up though, so it could anyone, including those that I claim to be a big fan of.

11. A weird one this. It's kinda emo, but I dig it, particularly the vitriolic screamy bits and the horns toward the end. The Wizard of Oz metaphors and anti-materialist worker drone thing are a little 6th former-ish, but I quite like that about it. There's a charm to it, rather than just being humourless angst.

12. Some glossy, hand-clappy proto-disco. The lyrics are inane and the whole thing is very slight, but when has that ever been a problem with disco? It put a skip in my step during my journey to work, and for that I thank it.

13. Ha! Knees-up crusty fun. This Duncan chap sounds like a good sort.

14. Quite a transition from track 13, but the best has definitely been saved for last. This is magnificent slice of dark techno. It has a heavy pulse but also a light touch. I'd be up for more of this. Great stuff.

Well that was quite a journey. I loved the 'anything goes' track-picking philosophy and the seemingly random bounce between a lot of unusual bed-fellows. I also enjoyed how some generally unloved (around BCB country at least) modern genres got a good look in, too.
Thanks a lot, I have much work to do following the reveal. The next time you're in the Town & Country I'll get the first round in (as long as we drink in moderation).
Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb...

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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Nick Danger » 16 Jun 2014, 16:09

Sgt Pepper wrote:POW!

I was your mixer this month Sarge. I'm glad you liked most of the mix. You are somewhat of a challenge for me but I had fun revisiting some of the newer music and electronica from my collection.

1. Recentish indie stuff (one would assume, possibly incorrectly) with big krautrock influences. The chugging bass, unflappable vocals and synthy flourishes all sound great. Obviously it's fairly derivative, but they're spot on and it sounds great. Top start.

Ankle Injuries - Fujiya and Miyagi
Despite the name they are not Japanese or a duo. This is an English trio from Brighton who took their name from a character in the movie Karate Kid and a brand of stereo equipment. This is from 2006.


2. This sounds like 90s pop-punk. I've got loads of time for this kind of thing. It's daft and prickly and fun and reminds me of my teenage years. Two minutes well spent. Ta.

This is all-girl pop punk band The Eyeliners. I love this kind of stuff and have a lot of it.

3. Fun time disco! Yes please. I feel like this must have been a pretty big hit, but I'm not entirely sure what it is. The track does sound very familiar although I'm not sure if that's because I've heard it lots of times, if I'm confusing it with something else, or it was sampled by someone else. Anyway, regardless, I love it to bits. It sounds quite late for disco, so I think were probably just straying in to the 80s. Great funky bass, too.

This is 70's/80's underrated soul funk group The Brothers Johnson with Stomp. This was a minor hit in 1980 in the U.S. but I think it has been sampled several times.

4. A bit of indie dance punk now. Not the kind of thing you'd expect to encounter on a BCB mix but I'm rather pleased it's here. Big chorus, lots of pop hooks, and some more groovy bass. I'd be pretty interested to investigate these guys further. There are similar bands that go bad pretty quickly, or have very patchy albums, but in the context of this disc, it sounds great.

Another current band Neon Trees. I don't usually go too much for this genre but this group is an exception.

5. I'm certainly a big fan of this kind of thing in general but this particular track seems to wander a bit too close to Jools Holland World Music territory. It's pleasant enough, and I like how fluttery it is, but there's something in the production (and possibly the saxophone) that keeps me at arms length.

Por Esos Mares by Costarico. They are a Spanish band based in Barcelona. I found this on a comp and I liked it. I don't watch much Jools Holland so it sounds fresh to me

6. Ah, this one I know, it's Joe Tex. Great, throbbing beat, although there does seem to be more than a little bit of Rock Your Baby in there. And obviously there's the lyrics that seem somewhat, um, dated. His voice still sounds great though.

Yes, it's Joe with one of his hits (1977). It does sound dated and goes on a little long but the singing and playing are solid.

7. Electroclash time. No idea what this is but it's freakin' great. A menacing bassline, some sneery, punky vocals and some random electronic knob-twiddling all make for a enjoyable three minutes. It really takes off toward the end, too. Will definitely check these guys out.

This is Foreign Islands with We Know You Know It. They are a dance/punk band from Brooklyn who made one album in 2007 and disappeared. This came from a comp but I might have to look for that album.

8. After track 7, this takes a while to sink in, but when it gets there it's a blast. I love the big arrangements, the horn blasts and the fiery vocals. I'm not prepared speculate as to its origins, other than a vaguely non-committal 'latin', but I'm definitely curious to find out more about its story.

This is Gene Pitney recording in Italian. This song finished second in the 1968 San Remo Festival, the highest finish ever for an American. It was a hit on the Italian charts following the festival.

9. Ah, now then, he's something I haven't heard for a while. From the intro I thought it might be early Orbital but then I cleverly deduced from the lyrics that this is in fact LFO. I adore electronica from this period. Bits are a slightly dated, but I still love that tinny drum sound. Smashin'.

You're right, this is LFO with their song also called LFO. It evidently stands for Low Frequency Oscillator. You can feel the bass on this one, can't you. Their albums carry warning stickers about possible speaker damage at higher volumes.

10. Another massive change in direction. Probably by about 60 years and 4000 miles. I like my blues to be pre-war, crackly and world-weary, so this is right up my street. I do tend to get most of these guys mixed up though, so it could anyone, including those that I claim to be a big fan of.

Not pre-war but just after, early 50s. It's John Lee Hooker with Hobo Blues. It's amazing what he can do with that one chord (or sometimes one string) groove. One of my favorite Blues tracks.

11. A weird one this. It's kinda emo, but I dig it, particularly the vitriolic screamy bits and the horns toward the end. The Wizard of Oz metaphors and anti-materialist worker drone thing are a little 6th former-ish, but I quite like that about it. There's a charm to it, rather than just being humourless angst.

This is alternative/Indie American band Cursive with a song from the late 90s. The title is Dorothy At Forty and as you picked up on it's about the Wizard of Oz.

12. Some glossy, hand-clappy proto-disco. The lyrics are inane and the whole thing is very slight, but when has that ever been a problem with disco? It put a skip in my step during my journey to work, and for that I thank it.

The band is A Taste Of Honey with Boogie Oogie Oogie an American hit in the late 70's.

13. Ha! Knees-up crusty fun. This Duncan chap sounds like a good sort.

The singer is Australian country music star Slim Dusty and the song is called Duncan. He died recently in his 90s and was evidently a big star down under. The only other time I've heard him was when he sang Waltzing Matilda at the closing ceremony at the Sydney Olympics a few years ago.

14. Quite a transition from track 13, but the best has definitely been saved for last. This is magnificent slice of dark techno. It has a heavy pulse but also a light touch. I'd be up for more of this. Great stuff.

This is House Music/Electronica German duo Ame. This track, called Rej, is from 2005. It apparently is a much loved track in the Techno/House Music/Electronica community and has appeared on almost 50 comps.

Well that was quite a journey. I loved the 'anything goes' track-picking philosophy and the seemingly random bounce between a lot of unusual bed-fellows. I also enjoyed how some generally unloved (around BCB country at least) modern genres got a good look in, too.
Thanks a lot, I have much work to do following the reveal. The next time you're in the Town & Country I'll get the first round in (as long as we drink in moderation).


Glad you liked. I really get to scratch my eclectism with your mixes. Multiple genres and abrupt transistions are going to be characteristic of my mixes I guess.

Tracklist -

1. Ankle Injuries - Fujiya and Miyagi
2. Finished With You - The Eyeliners
3. Stomp - The Brothers Johnson
4. Girls And Boys In School - The Neon Trees
5. Por Esos Mares - Costorico
6. Ain't Gonna Bump No More - Joe Tex
7. We Know You Know It - Foreign Islands
8. Nessuno Mi Puo Guidicare - Gene Pitney
9. LFO - LFO
10. Hobo Blues - John Lee Hooker
11. Dorothy At Forty - Cursive
12. Boogie Oogie Oogie - A Taste Of Honey
13. Duncan - Slim Dusty
14. Rej - Ame

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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Duncan » 18 Jun 2014, 21:32

Nick Danger wrote:Tracklist -

1. Ankle Injuries - Fujiya and Miyagi
2. Finished With You - The Eyeliners
3. Stomp - The Brothers Johnson
4. Girls And Boys In School - The Neon Trees
5. Por Esos Mares - Costorico
6. Ain't Gonna Bump No More - Joe Tex
7. We Know You Know It - Foreign Islands
8. Nessuno Mi Puo Guidicare - Gene Pitney
9. LFO - LFO
10. Hobo Blues - John Lee Hooker
11. Dorothy At Forty - Cursive
12. Boogie Oogie Oogie - A Taste Of Honey
13. Duncan - Slim Dusty
14. Rej - Ame


Crackin', cheers. Ame vinyl looks difficult/expensive to obtain, but thanks a bunch for bringing them to my attention. I'll keep and eye out. Lots more to investigate too. Thanks again.
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Duncan » 18 Jun 2014, 21:33

fangedango! wrote:Been digging this compact but very tasty mix for a week or so now, and my mystery mixer knows my number and probably my address and email too.


Aye, it's me. I put this together at the same time as my JB&S list, so what you have here is a collection of tracks that I love but seemed too risky, too esoteric, too broad-church, or just too similar to my other final picks. It's roughly in chronological order, although I haven't bothered to check this.

fangedango! wrote:1. A lovely old acoustic blues from the scratchy old days, sanctified blues with plenty of the church in the delivery from the singer though what I get from the lyrics about ‘ham bones’ seems very secular.


Rube Lacy & Ralph Lembo - Ham Hound Crave. I don't really know who Rube and Ralph are, although there appears to be a couple of other tracks floating around the internet for Lacy. I can tell you that it's from 1928 and can be found on the Broke Black & Blue box set.

fangedango! wrote:2. Eddie Boyd doing his stone-classic ‘Five Long Years’; was on my JB&S long list, but is just too deep and gritty for most of the BCB cognicenti.


Ha, yep, pretty much my thinking too.

fangedango! wrote:3. A wonderful piano trio here, from the sound of the production we’re probably talking ‘50’s, or maybe earlier, but there’s a definite hard bop flavor to the material that makes me think ‘50s. Very reminiscent of Silver’s trio work, gorgeous melodies and locked-tight rhythm section. Excellent.


This is the Herbie Nichols Trio with It Didn't Happen, from the 1955 album The Prophetic Herbie Nichols vol 2, which is one of my favourite overlooked Blue Note records (and also has one of my favourite covers).

fangedango! wrote:4. Latin groovefest with big horns and more cowbell. What’s not to love? 1960’s maybe, the arrangements are tight as hell and sound is full and expansive. Great.


Still firmly in the 50's, this is Machito with the track Tanga. Proto Nu Yorica fun.

fangedango! wrote:5. A long loping jazz-funk workout that is full of tasty goodness. Wicked sax and guitars. Killer.


Eddie Harris - Live Right Now. I was pretty close to including this in my final JBS list but it's the kind of track that you have to allow the time and freedom to take you where it wants to, and the cup probably wasn't the best place for that. I knew that it would find a good home here though.

fangedango! wrote:6. Some countrified deep soul with a slow, funky base. Lovely.


Soul Brothers Six - Can't Live Without You. Lovely indeed.

fangedango! wrote:7. Organ, guitar and sax jazz-funk that is right up my alley. A simple basic bluesy theme, very familiar. A bulls-eye with me, every time.


Caesar Frazier - Hicky Burr. Some wiggy jazz funk from '72.

fangedango! wrote:8. A really cool Latin burner, lots of shakers and percussion mixing with the bouncing bass, horns and light Afro-style guitar. Great.


Grupo Abharca- Schallcarri. Colombian swing with heavy afrobeat influences. I snatched this from the highly recommended comp Diablos Del Ritmo - The Colombian Melting Pot 1960 - 1985.

fangedango! wrote:9. Love this one, ‘Silly Savage’ from the Keb Darge deep funk disc. I live for this shit.


Aye, that's exactly where I found this. Me too.

fangedango! wrote:10. More Latin, more goodness. ‘I love ya!’


Jimmy Sabater - Yroco. Jimmy rose to fame on Fania, although I don't know if he was still knocking around there. It's great though, I love it.

fangedango! wrote:11. The stone-classic ‘Holy Thursday’, always a joy to hear, been a while since I’ve played my Axelrod discs.


Yeah, I haven't listened to Axelrod in ages, but this popped up when I was considering some different jazz options. I kinda wish I'd kept it in the final list now.

fangedango! wrote:12. And another classic, Zapp’s ‘More Bounce To The Ounce’ to finish up. Loved it back when it came out, still love it now.


I wasn't convinced that you'd be in to this, but I'm glad that you are. It's never not fun.

fangedango! wrote:Cheers mixer, you the man.
[/quote]

Ta. Always a pleasure.
Some days you just can't get rid of a bomb...

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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Walk In My Shadow » 21 Jun 2014, 23:28

Allright. 18 tracks on this mix. Makes me think Rayge’s my mixer this month.

01. Jaunty piano piece to kick things off. Rather swinging thing, sounds like older jazz.
02. Old rockabilly, 1950’s. Sounds raw and direct and a little crazy. Good stuff.
03. Starts with a Stevie Winwood like organ Spencer Davies style and sound like a product from the 60’s. Great number but not a clue as to who.
04. Also sounds from the 60’s but a little more weird pop with a sitar thrown in the middle for good measure. I was thinking The Herd but I honestly never heard it before. I do like it.
05. Chugging guitar rock and the singer sounds English despite the Oregon sky reference in the lyrics. This does not sound like we’re in the 60’s anymore.
06. I think this is John Prine with a little rougher music than what he’susually known for. Good story song with strong lead guitar.
07. An easy one (at last!) Django or Grapelli but probably both. Not exactly my favorite kind of music.
08. Old acoustic blues from Blind Willie. Always a winner.
09. Jolly R ‘n B from way back this. And a hefty sax solo to booth. Yes, very good.
10. This is classic electric instrumental blues. One of the Kings perhaps? Great stuff.
11. Fantastic song this. Could be a contender for Peggy Lee’s Fever as it’s totally the same mood.
12. Old Soul call and response number with all the trimmings. Female backing, horns, the works. Mid-tempo probably called What’s that you got. Not a clue again.
13. The song is definitely Spoonful but done in such a way it would make Steely Dan or Boz Scaggs proud. Totally different arrangement and the nicest surprise on the mix.
14. And on to cryin’ Country. Not Outlaw but good solid tear-in-my-beer Country. Love these too when in the right mood. Good choice.
15. Banjo heavy country instrumental. Impeccably played but not really my cup of tea.
16. I own several Jim Lauderdale records and this Redbird comes from a collaboration with Ralph Stanley. Love it!
17. This is the great and too often unrecognized Ronnie Lane. Did fantastic work with the Faces (big and Small) but his Slim Chance stuff is often overlooked. Yeah!
18. I feel I should recognize both singer and song here. Certainly the singer. Damn! Strange little arrangement.

OK so I really enjoyed the mix. Honestly. A couple of the choices were not really for me but the rest were great and have been on repeat for a while now. Thanks mixer, good job and how about a reveal soonish?
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Rayge » 22 Jun 2014, 15:28

Walk In My Shadow wrote:Allright. 18 tracks on this mix. Makes me think Rayge’s my mixer this month.


not guilty, m'lud
In timeless moments we live forever

You can't play a tune on an absolute

When the ball sleeps it dreams it is a Frisbee

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the law. Love is the law, love under will

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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby whodathunkit » 22 Jun 2014, 16:53

Walk In My Shadow wrote:Allright. 18 tracks on this mix. Makes me think Rayge’s my mixer this month.


Tee hee! T'was I Yves and here's the line-up.

01. Jaunty piano piece to kick things off. Rather swinging thing, sounds like older jazz.

Jaunty little 60s instrumental for starters - Young-Holt Unlimited (ex Ramsey Lewis people) and "Wack Wack"

02. Old rockabilly, 1950’s. Sounds raw and direct and a little crazy. Good stuff.

Followed of course by "Punchy Wunchy Wickey Wackey-Woo" :D .Hasil Adkins, a man who made a great deal out of a small talent.

03. Starts with a Stevie Winwood like organ Spencer Davies style and sound like a product from the 60’s. Great number but not a clue as to who.

SD-style cos that's who it is. "Morning Sun" from their excellent post-Winwood album With Their New Face On

04. Also sounds from the 60’s but a little more weird pop with a sitar thrown in the middle for good measure. I was thinking The Herd but I honestly never heard it before. I do like it.

Just a nice (very) 60s pop song. Tim Wilde and "Popcorn Double Feature" from 1966

05. Chugging guitar rock and the singer sounds English despite the Oregon sky reference in the lyrics. This does not sound like we’re in the 60’s anymore.

Something from this year. From Ben Watt's rather whimpey album Hendra, this is the one real rocker and it's easily the best thing on it - "Nathaniel".

06. I think this is John Prine with a little rougher music than what he’susually known for. Good story song with strong lead guitar.

Can't go wrong with Prine. "We Are The Lonely" from 1995's Lost Dogs And Mixed Blessings

07. An easy one (at last!) Django or Grapelli but probably both. Not exactly my favorite kind of music.

Well, I had to include somebody Belgian and Jacques Brel didn't seem to fit :D . D and G with "Daphne".

08. Old acoustic blues from Blind Willie. Always a winner

Yes indeed."Talkin' To Your Mama" - BWT..

09. Jolly R ‘n B from way back this. And a hefty sax solo to booth. Yes, very good.

Feller called Danny Taylor and "You Look Bad". Great lyric on this

10. This is classic electric instrumental blues. One of the Kings perhaps? Great stuff.

Freddie K and "Sidetracked". A perfect 3 minutes - not a spare note on it.

11. Fantastic song this. Could be a contender for Peggy Lee’s Fever as it’s totally the same mood.

Found this on one of Giles Peterson's crate-digging collections. Marva Josie and "He Does It Better". Must find some more of her stuff.

12. Old Soul call and response number with all the trimmings. Female backing, horns, the works. Mid-tempo probably called What’s that you got. Not a clue again.

Again I only have a name - Rudolph Taylor and "What's That You Got?" From an Ace records collection Lost Soul Gems From Memphis"

13. The song is definitely Spoonful but done in such a way it would make Steely Dan or Boz Scaggs proud. Totally different arrangement and the nicest surprise on the mix.

Certainly a surprise to me as I thought you might hate this. I stuck it on anyway :D . The sort of slick white blues that upsets the purists but is fine by me. Steve Miller and "Just A Little Bit" from his "Born 2 Be Blue" album.

14. And on to cryin’ Country. Not Outlaw but good solid tear-in-my-beer Country. Love these too when in the right mood. Good choice.

Thought I'd finish with some country stuff. I think country and I think George Jones. This is "The Honky Tonk Downstairs"

15. Banjo heavy country instrumental. Impeccably played but not really my cup of tea.

The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band from their "Let's play with some old guys" album Will The Circle Be Unbroken - "Nashville Blues"

16. I own several Jim Lauderdale records and this Redbird comes from a collaboration with Ralph Stanley. Love it!

A big old favourite of mine too, Lost In The Lonesome Pines

17. This is the great and too often unrecognized Ronnie Lane. Did fantastic work with the Faces (big and Small) but his Slim Chance stuff is often overlooked. Yeah!

A lovely old Derroll Adams song, "Roll On Babe".

18. I feel I should recognize both singer and song here. Certainly the singer. Damn! Strange little arrangement.

Thought you would get this one Yves. A Brit in New Orleans,Jon Cleary and "When The Partys Over" from last years Occapella


Walk In My Shadow wrote:OK so I really enjoyed the mix. Honestly. A couple of the choices were not really for me but the rest were great and have been on repeat for a while now. Thanks mixer, good job and how about a reveal soonish?


My pleasure. Time for a list, methinks.

1. "Wack Wack" - Young-Holt Unlimited
2. "Punchey Wunchy Whickey Wackey-Woo" - Hasil Adkins
3. "Morning Sun" - The Spencer Davis Group
4. "Popcorn Double Feature" - Tim Wilde
5. "Nathaniel" - Ben Watt
6. "We Are The Lonely" - John Prine
7. "Daphne" - Django Reinhardt
8. "Talkin' To Your Mama" - Blind Willie McTell
9. "You Look Bad" - Danny Taylor
10. "Sidetracked" - Freddie King
11. "He Does It Better" - Marva Josie
12. "Whats That You Got" - Rudolph Taylor
13. "Just A Little Bit" - Steve Miller
14. "The Honky Tonk Downstairs" - George Jones
15. "Nashville Blues" - Nitty Gritty Dirt Band
16. "Redbird" - Jim Lauderdale and Ralph Stanley.
17. "Roll On Babe" - Ronnie Lane's Slim Chance
18. "When The Party's Over" - Jon Cleary
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The Fish
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby The Fish » 28 Jun 2014, 11:19

Mix this month from Heilan Coo, who’s kindly supplied me with Cheese Eating Surrender Monkeys Greatest Hits (my title not his).

1) In a sense the odd one out here being Belgian (although others may be for all I know). Call it punk lite, call it a guilty pleasure, call it what you will but it’s Plastic Bertrand and it still sounds great.
2) Hi energy bit of cheese that throws up images of lava lamp style projected light shows with go go dancers in cages.
3) A nice jazz funk groove. Unfortunately the vocalist is so annoying I want to slap her.
4) Standard bit of ye-ye style pop. Slight but fun.
5) This is more like it. Great groove with interjections rather than vocals. All a bit mad.
6) This sounds oddly familiar :D She’s no Dusty though. Hard to go wrong with a song as great as this, but ultimately it’s more of an oddity or conversation piece rather than standing out in its own right.
7) A real mish mash of 60s styles. Almost a country pop ballad done psych style, with various bits lifted ; the sitar style twang for example is straight out of Hole In My Shoe. Strangely it all comes together and this is quite engaging.
8) I thought this was going to be the sort of French thing I hate, all mean and moody with no substance, but this lifted off out of nowhere. This is just bonkers really but enjoyable.
9) Is he really singing about little sausages ?
10) Well for all your talk about tagging and complaining that album covers appeared in your mix, I can confidently state that this comes from a compilation called Tangled Up In Sacre Bleu. Now how do I know that ? Not so smug now are we Quiff boy :D Anyway this is one of those gamine style chanteuses who probably did a video for this with her pouting underneath an umbrella or some such.
11) Well it took two seconds to spot the song here. As per track 6.
12) This sounds familiar which got me wondering if all of these are covers, although only two as mentioned have leapt out at me as such. This sounds a bit like Crossroads (Robert Johnson rather than Tony Hatch). Anyway this one is great.
13) Again the song sounds familiar. I like it, it’s just bugging me what it is.
14) One of my favourites here. Like the vocalist, a slight hint of Judy Henske.
15) It occurred to me on a number of these tracks but most noticeably here that the French must really love The Doors. Manzarek and Krieger stylings all over this.
16) Ultra quirky with weird female vocals. I love it or I hate it. Still don’t know which.
17) I’m sure I know the song, sounds Motownish although it’s hard to tell. This is probably going to be something obvious which makes me think this would make a good quiz round – well known songs done in a completely different style and sung in French. Harder than it sounds.
18) Having mentioned earlier the kind of thing I hate, here is a prime example. I just do not get the love for Gainsbourg and the like. Mumbling through a Gauloises haze does NOT make you look cool.
Thanks Lee, that was oddly enjoyable if a bit like chocolate cake i.e don’t want too much at one sitting. I'm keen to know just how many of these were covers, there were loads I thought I knew but couldn't quite place. As mentioned above it is surprisingly hard.
We're way past rhubarb

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Heilan Coo
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby Heilan Coo » 29 Jun 2014, 16:16

The Fish wrote:Well for all your talk about tagging and complaining that album covers appeared in your mix, I can confidently state that this comes from a compilation called Tangled Up In Sacre Bleu. Now how do I know that ? Not so smug now are we Quiff boy :D


Aye, that's because I decided to entitle the entire compilation Tangled Up In Sacre Bleu (quite handy for disguising the original albums and artists, I find) and tagged it thus. Smug? Now, come on. Would a smug man let you say that and still offer you some pie?... :wink:

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savoirfaire wrote:They are extremely cuddly, to the point where I think I was literally molested by a few of them. I completely understand how the farmer-goat relationships must happen.

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The Fish
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Re: May/June Reviews

Postby The Fish » 29 Jun 2014, 19:07

:twisted:
We're way past rhubarb