Return of the RECENT VIEWING

..and why not?
caramba
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby caramba » 16 Nov 2018, 12:12

$P.Muff$ wrote:Samoan used to have a quote of mine regarding New Order's "Temptation" as her signature. It was such a benign quote I never understood why someone would feel the need to use it as their signature. Now this. Strange.


Never had any dealings with him/her until a few months ago, when he/she posted some condescending post about me on FB (I don't have an
account there).

When I PMed him/her to ask what his/her problem was, found my PM had been publicly posted on the Hurt-free Threadcrapping
thread on Treasury of Mirth.

Think that sort of thing is a bit beyond the pale, tbh

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driftin
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby driftin » 16 Nov 2018, 13:15

Image

Now THIS is the film that I thought the Paul Greengrass one was going to be like. Ultra kinetic, nerve-wracking, breathless, and deeply emotional to the core. It's also in the correct language and is purely from the victims' perspective as the perpetrator is always pushed to the side of the frame. This is more like it.

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PENK
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby PENK » 17 Nov 2018, 19:30

Image

The Coens' latest, released straight to Netflix, is a six-part anthology of Western stories. It was reportedly originally slated to be a full series, later reduced to film length, and it does unfortunately show at times, with a couple of the tales feeling like ideas that never went anywhere. It's also full of the things it's easy to criticise the Coens for: caricatures rather than characters, self-satisfied pastiche and so on.
Then again, it's got plenty of what makes them great: handsome and stylish photography, sparkling dialogue and offbeat wit, and a cast of big names and where've-I-seen-him-before character actors all having a splendid time and ensuring the audience does too.
The titular first story has Tim Blake Nelson owning the screen as a crooning dandy gunslinger, but it's also the most frustratingly underdeveloped of the six stories. The second is one of the directors' beloved shaggy dog tales, with James Franco as a luckless outlaw, but it's brief, jokey and probably the weakest moment. Things start getting a bit more serious and thought-out in part three, with Liam Neeson's impresario travelling together with a limbless actor, played by someone British called Harry Melling, who does in real life have arms and legs and who seems previously best-known for a small recurring role in the Harry Potter series. Melling is surprisingly good but - and this happens a lot with the Coens - the story spends a lot of time involving your emotions and setting things up only to let you down with a damp squib of an ending.
The two centrepieces are strongest: Tom Waits is excellent in a lonely performance as a determined prospector stumbling across a gorgeous valley, while Zoe Kazan and Bill Heck are a touching pair on a wagon trail west in what is easily the most powerful and genuine segment.
We finish with an underpowered, talky stagecoach ride with five mismatched passengers, though the acting is again uniformly excellent - let's pick out Jonjo O'Neill if we must single out an individual - and does save it from leaving a bad taste.
There is no doubting the Coens' love of Westerns and they do bring something new and personal to the genre with these stories, but at the same time the ideas often seem half-sketched and despite the great cast and some good lines, the riotous surrealism of their best work is missing. Instead, it's the most honest and straight stories, those of Waits and Kazan, that make the most impression.
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Minnie Cheddars wrote:Baron got into a fight with some Satan’s Slaves over some culinary issue

Awful thing when that happens. I had a similar experience at a Tom Jones concert.

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driftin
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby driftin » 18 Nov 2018, 02:06

PENK wrote:Image

The Coens' latest, released straight to Netflix, is a six-part anthology of Western stories. It was reportedly originally slated to be a full series, later reduced to film length, and it does unfortunately show at times, with a couple of the tales feeling like ideas that never went anywhere. It's also full of the things it's easy to criticise the Coens for: caricatures rather than characters, self-satisfied pastiche and so on.
Then again, it's got plenty of what makes them great: handsome and stylish photography, sparkling dialogue and offbeat wit, and a cast of big names and where've-I-seen-him-before character actors all having a splendid time and ensuring the audience does too.
The titular first story has Tim Blake Nelson owning the screen as a crooning dandy gunslinger, but it's also the most frustratingly underdeveloped of the six stories. The second is one of the directors' beloved shaggy dog tales, with James Franco as a luckless outlaw, but it's brief, jokey and probably the weakest moment. Things start getting a bit more serious and thought-out in part three, with Liam Neeson's impresario travelling together with a limbless actor, played by someone British called Harry Melling, who does in real life have arms and legs and who seems previously best-known for a small recurring role in the Harry Potter series. Melling is surprisingly good but - and this happens a lot with the Coens - the story spends a lot of time involving your emotions and setting things up only to let you down with a damp squib of an ending.
The two centrepieces are strongest: Tom Waits is excellent in a lonely performance as a determined prospector stumbling across a gorgeous valley, while Zoe Kazan and Bill Heck are a touching pair on a wagon trail west in what is easily the most powerful and genuine segment.
We finish with an underpowered, talky stagecoach ride with five mismatched passengers, though the acting is again uniformly excellent - let's pick out Jonjo O'Neill if we must single out an individual - and does save it from leaving a bad taste.
There is no doubting the Coens' love of Westerns and they do bring something new and personal to the genre with these stories, but at the same time the ideas often seem half-sketched and despite the great cast and some good lines, the riotous surrealism of their best work is missing. Instead, it's the most honest and straight stories, those of Waits and Kazan, that make the most impression.

I enjoyed it all except for Liam Neeson's one which was merely okay.

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driftin
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby driftin » 19 Nov 2018, 15:58

Image

If this was an hour shorter I'd probably like it as much as the Argento original because there's a really weird, creepy, fantastic film buried beneath all of the indulgent fluff.

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Jeemo
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Jeemo » 19 Nov 2018, 21:10

Sweet Smell of Sucess. Lancaster and Curtis were never better than in this. Fantastic gritty portrayal of New York. All from the same director that gave us Whisky Galore and The Lady Killers.
Image So Long Kid, Take A Bow.

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$P.Muff$
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby $P.Muff$ » 20 Nov 2018, 13:41

caramba wrote:
$P.Muff$ wrote:Samoan used to have a quote of mine regarding New Order's "Temptation" as her signature. It was such a benign quote I never understood why someone would feel the need to use it as their signature. Now this. Strange.


Never had any dealings with him/her until a few months ago, when he/she posted some condescending post about me on FB (I don't have an
account there).

When I PMed him/her to ask what his/her problem was, found my PM had been publicly posted on the Hurt-free Threadcrapping
thread on Treasury of Mirth.

Think that sort of thing is a bit beyond the pale, tbh


Other than that being shitty and a bit bizarre, I really don't know what to make of it. I've interacted with this person maybe half a dozen times on here tops. Nothing personal or anything. And I've never had a FB account either. If people moan about me on there my thoughts are basically 'fuck 'em'.

Anyway... I don't want to derail the film thread with B.S., so back to cinema.

I only got to see the last hour of this on TCM, but it intrigued me greatly and reminded me just how little knowledge I have regarding Japanese film:


The Profound Desire of the Gods
Image

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algroth
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby algroth » 20 Nov 2018, 14:32

$P.Muff$ wrote:I only got to see the last hour of this on TCM, but it intrigued me greatly and reminded me just how little knowledge I have regarding Japanese film:


The Profound Desire of the Gods
Image


Well worth watching the whole of it! A really fantastic film, and in my all-time top 20. Have you seen any Imamura otherwise?

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$P.Muff$
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby $P.Muff$ » 20 Nov 2018, 15:12

algroth wrote: Have you seen any Imamura otherwise?


I haven't unfortunately. I've watched maybe 15 or 20 Japanese films in my entire life.

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algroth
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby algroth » 20 Nov 2018, 15:30

$P.Muff$ wrote:
algroth wrote: Have you seen any Imamura otherwise?


I haven't unfortunately. I've watched maybe 15 or 20 Japanese films in my entire life.


He's definitely worth exploring, very likely my favorite Japanese filmmaker. Check out Vengeance Is Mine, Pigs and Battleships and Intentions of Murder if you can too!

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driftin
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby driftin » 20 Nov 2018, 18:23

$P.Muff$ wrote:The Profound Desire of the Gods
Image

I agree with what Algroth said. It's an excellent film from an equally excellent director.

You've only seen a handful of Japanese films? :o In a way I'm jealous because you have so much greatness to watch for the first time. Can't really go wrong by starting with the more famous films from Kurosawa, Teshigahara, Ozu, Miyazaki, Mizoguchi, Miike, and of course Imamura.

If you're exploring more from this director then I most recommend The Insect Woman and Black Rain. It's hard for me to decide which one of those two is my favourite from him.

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northernsky
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby northernsky » 20 Nov 2018, 18:29

Image

When Schrader’s on his game, there’s no one better. Fucking brilliant film, far superior to Shame, which garnered so much more attention.

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algroth
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby algroth » 20 Nov 2018, 18:51

driftin wrote:
$P.Muff$ wrote:The Profound Desire of the Gods
Image

I agree with what Algroth said. It's an excellent film from an equally excellent director.

You've only seen a handful of Japanese films? :o In a way I'm jealous because you have so much greatness to watch for the first time. Can't really go wrong by starting with the more famous films from Kurosawa, Teshigahara, Ozu, Miyazaki, Mizoguchi, Miike, and of course Imamura.

If you're exploring more from this director then I most recommend The Insect Woman and Black Rain. It's hard for me to decide which one of those two is my favourite from him.


Those two are also brilliant. Also worth checking out Masaki Kobayashi's stuff which is utterly immense.

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driftin
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby driftin » 20 Nov 2018, 19:28

algroth wrote:
driftin wrote:
$P.Muff$ wrote:The Profound Desire of the Gods
Image

I agree with what Algroth said. It's an excellent film from an equally excellent director.

You've only seen a handful of Japanese films? :o In a way I'm jealous because you have so much greatness to watch for the first time. Can't really go wrong by starting with the more famous films from Kurosawa, Teshigahara, Ozu, Miyazaki, Mizoguchi, Miike, and of course Imamura.

If you're exploring more from this director then I most recommend The Insect Woman and Black Rain. It's hard for me to decide which one of those two is my favourite from him.


Those two are also brilliant. Also worth checking out Masaki Kobayashi's stuff which is utterly immense.

Dunno how I forgot Kobayashi considering that Kwaidan is probably my favourite Japanese film ever.

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$P.Muff$
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby $P.Muff$ » 20 Nov 2018, 21:35

The majority of Japanese films I've seen have been directed by Kurowsawa & Miyazaki. Watched a couple by Ozu and Mizoguchi... but yeah, I suck.

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$P.Muff$
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby $P.Muff$ » 21 Nov 2018, 14:40

Image

I thought I'd lose interest in this fairly quickly but was pleasantly surprised. There were a couple plot points that seemed unrealistic, but Jessica Lange gives a solid performance as a recently widowed mother struggling with two sons and a forced move to Baltimore.

The real highlight for me was Joan Cusack as the oddball Apt. neighbor with a penchant to help others, and for teenage boys.

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harvey k-tel
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby harvey k-tel » 21 Nov 2018, 16:20

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The story has sucked me in despite the atrocious acting.
If you've got nothing to do, don't do it here.

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Jeemo
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Jeemo » 21 Nov 2018, 17:13

The Promise. Would be epic about the Armenian Genocide. It come across a bit Son of Dr Zhivago at times, medical student, love triangle against dramatic historical event. Its a bit too black and white, all Turks bar one are evil.

However it did make me go and read some stuff about it, which was one of the reasons it was made in the first place.

Solid rather than Spectacular
Image So Long Kid, Take A Bow.

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$P.Muff$
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby $P.Muff$ » 22 Nov 2018, 00:54

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I knew nothing about early, underground, late night NY talk radio before watching this. Bob Fass is definitely my kind of people.

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Jeemo
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Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Jeemo » 22 Nov 2018, 09:25

Last night we watched Key Largo. Not really top notch Bogart but pretty good.
Image So Long Kid, Take A Bow.