Franco Zeffirelli è morto....

..and why not?
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never/ever
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Franco Zeffirelli è morto....

Postby never/ever » 15 Jun 2019, 12:45

96 years young....

His Taming Of The Shrew is still an unadulterated classic.
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Sneelock
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Re: Franco Zeffirelli è morto....

Postby Sneelock » 16 Jun 2019, 01:17

It sure is.

Words can not convey what a big deal his “Romeo & Juliet” was when I was 10 years old in America. I wouldn’t see it until my teens but it was in the zeitgeist like nobody’s business.

A Donovan fan took me to see “Brother Son, Sister Moon” when it was new. We both enjoyed it. The next day I read the newspaper reviews and they were both very negative. This might be the first time I saw and enjoyed a movie & later learned how terrible it was.

I was an usher in a movie theatre showing “La Traviata”. It was my job to stand just inside the back theatre doors about ten minutes before the end of the film. As soon as the lights came up, I had to prop open the doors. Well, I walked in, knowing very little of La Traviata and started crying like a baby. I stayed to watch the movie from the beginning at the end of my shift and cried again.

He did period well. I really love how those movies are full of cobblestones and stuff like that. He got a lot out of actors even ones who maybe didn’t have a lot of chops yet. He made a movie that made a non Opera fan want to watch an opera movie.

I should try harder to say nice things about guys like this before they die. At his very best he was a heavy duty, world class film maker.
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never/ever
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Re: Franco Zeffirelli è morto....

Postby never/ever » 16 Jun 2019, 02:14

We had a movie club at my 'high school' and it would show any of the classic movies on the big screen. Shrew was one of those movies that for most of us went really slow but the cinematography was one of the things that grabbed us.... that 'cobblestone'-description fits it really well, something that drew me to the nouvelle vague-movement and carried by a lot of childhood memories of holudays in France and Italy.

I did watch Romeo & Juliet a long time ago and as ponderous as transferring a play can get to the big screen, for some reason it never felt too heavy or overbearing.
I should watch the Traviata someday.
kath wrote:i do not wanna buy the world a fucquin gotdamn coke.