BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

..and why not?
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GoogaMooga
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BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby GoogaMooga » 01 Nov 2018, 05:25

Sheesh, only 45/100 - too many newies on the list:
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201810 ... CyN-UfVQ6s
1966 and all that

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pcqgod
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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby pcqgod » 01 Nov 2018, 14:40

19/100
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algroth
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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby algroth » 01 Nov 2018, 16:55

Newies? You mean new to you, or just new films in general? Because there's only been 26 films since the 90s included in the list, reduced to 13 if we only consider since the turn of the century. Anyhow, it's a rather interesting and surprising list, though I have to seriously question the validity of the pool of critics polled. For those pertaining to Argentina, the likes of Diego Batlle, Roger Koza, Fernando López or David Oubiña have been ignored whilst Javier Porta-Fouz, the local Armond White, has been polled instead. That is baffling to all manner of degrees. Also surprised at the high placement of some Chinese films throughout - Farewell My Concubine in the top 15 for one - but am not surprised considering the number of Chinese critics polled; and I for one also find that touch rather interesting as for a while I've seen the academic 'canon' over in the West utterly dominated by Western filmmakers (aside from the occasional Japanese outlier like Kurosawa or Ozu) whilst ignoring the veritable treasure trove that Asian film in general have to offer. I still lament the fact that back when I attended film school we had to dedicate whole classes to fucking Godard in four or five different subjects but never once touched the likes of the Japanese New Wave. So yeah, decent list.

Also seen 68/100.

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the masked man
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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby the masked man » 01 Nov 2018, 18:17

76. Better list than I expected.

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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby The Modernist » 01 Nov 2018, 18:46

algroth wrote: I still lament the fact that back when I attended film school we had to dedicate whole classes to fucking Godard in four or five different subjects but never once touched the likes of the Japanese New Wave.


Interesting. I do think we will increasingly see that Eurocentric view challenged.

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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby GoogaMooga » 01 Nov 2018, 18:50

Yes, in the 80s and 90s we had Taiwan, and now South Korea is getting a lot of attention.
1966 and all that

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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby Dayodead » 02 Nov 2018, 00:29

42/100

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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby GoogaMooga » 02 Nov 2018, 00:39

algroth, new in general
1966 and all that

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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby Matt Wilson » 03 Nov 2018, 00:13

Another great list. We should celebrate these lists which celebrate world cinema.
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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby Snarfyguy » 03 Nov 2018, 00:53

Matt Wilson wrote:Another great list. We should celebrate these lists which celebrate world cinema.

Perhaps we can list the greatest lists of films ever assembled.
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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby Matt Wilson » 03 Nov 2018, 18:34

You start us off then.
Coan wrote:'Vertigo' is one of the best things U2 have ever done, one of a handful of occasions where they get it just right. That bit near the end where the song lifts off? You don't get that with The Allman Brothers.

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the masked man
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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby the masked man » 03 Nov 2018, 19:13

The Modernist wrote:
algroth wrote: I still lament the fact that back when I attended film school we had to dedicate whole classes to fucking Godard in four or five different subjects but never once touched the likes of the Japanese New Wave.


Interesting. I do think we will increasingly see that Eurocentric view challenged.


I can also see a different emphasis on the European front, which has always regarded Western European cinema over Eastern European films (with the obvious exception of Russia). As a result, Czech, Polish and Romanian cinema are undervalued generally. Hopefully this will change.

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Re: BBC Culture's 100 greatest foreign-language films

Postby algroth » 03 Nov 2018, 19:14

the masked man wrote:
The Modernist wrote:
algroth wrote: I still lament the fact that back when I attended film school we had to dedicate whole classes to fucking Godard in four or five different subjects but never once touched the likes of the Japanese New Wave.


Interesting. I do think we will increasingly see that Eurocentric view challenged.


I can also see a different emphasis on the European front, which has always regarded Western European cinema over Eastern European films (with the obvious exception of Russia). As a result, Czech, Polish and Romanian cinema are undervalued generally. Hopefully this will change.


I agree with that too.