Return of the RECENT VIEWING

..and why not?
User avatar
jimboo
Posts: 6417
Joined: 29 Dec 2005, 17:43
Location: taking a foxy kind of stand

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby jimboo » 16 Mar 2017, 19:05

PresMuffley wrote:
pcqgod wrote:Image

Fail-Safe (1964)

This one was somewhat disappointing after hearing about how great this movie was since I was a boy -- even my dad was a fan. The premise of a mechanical goof sending a flight of bombers to Russia is gripping, but the set-up is filled with so many improbabilities and contrivances it seemed more like a long "Twilight Zone" episode, complete with the moralizing at the end, than a realistic international thriller. Still, it has its moments.


Yeah, I was bummed by that one. Total snoozefest.


Oh , just me likes it then.
Goat Boy wrote:Oh, do fuck off, prog boy.

User avatar
jimboo
Posts: 6417
Joined: 29 Dec 2005, 17:43
Location: taking a foxy kind of stand

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby jimboo » 16 Mar 2017, 19:07

Goat Boy wrote:Image

It's an odd movie. Like a Hollywood attempt at a European art house flick with pulpy undertones (its theme of middle class ennui is right out of european cinema of the time). It bombed on release and presumably including Rock Hudson probably contributed to audiences expectations being wildly unfulfilled but it is great and haunting. There is quality throughout: James Wong Howe superb cinematography, all weird angles and extreme, slightly grotesque closes up brilliantly accentuates the disorienting weirdness of the story; Rock Hudson is excellent as the middle aged man presented with a second chance at life and Will Greer is marvelously contained as the ruthless owner of the "company"; Jerry Goldsmiths score is terrific; Saul Bass' intro is superb and the ending is one of the great downer endings in film. Highly recommended


I would love to see this , where did you get your copy Dougie ?
Goat Boy wrote:Oh, do fuck off, prog boy.

User avatar
Goat Boy
Bogarting the joint
Posts: 30442
Joined: 20 Mar 2007, 12:11
Location: In the perfumed garden

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Goat Boy » 17 Mar 2017, 10:07

German Dave wrote:Have a long hard look in the mirror will you

User avatar
algroth
Posts: 4932
Joined: 04 Apr 2010, 03:12

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby algroth » 17 Mar 2017, 10:27



Depending on what region you're at there are also Eureka and Criterion editions available.

User avatar
Jimbo
Posts: 13862
Joined: 26 Dec 2009, 21:22

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Jimbo » 17 Mar 2017, 14:30

La La Land - one of the best movies ever made. I truly loved it! The themes were clear and there were many: romantic love, of course, but also history, integrity, nostalgia, ambitions, disappointment, heartlessness, show business, not to mention how wonderfully crafted the whole thing is. Yes, indeed … five stars.
persona non grata among those who worship at the altar of conventional wisdom

User avatar
Darkness_Fish
Posts: 4013
Joined: 27 Jul 2015, 09:58

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Darkness_Fish » 17 Mar 2017, 20:50

Image

As far as zombie horror comedies go, it's pretty much close to the bottom of the pile.
Saving my holier-than-thou nonsense for a more deserving cause since '82

User avatar
Jeemo
Posts: 20168
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 23:17
Location: ????

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Jeemo » 18 Mar 2017, 09:16

Watched a few movies while flying, a few pot boilers. Latest Jack Reacher, Inferno, and a few other big budget pieces of fluff.

I also watched Manchester by The Sea, it's ok. But why the big hype. The most emotional parts in the movie were where they used classical music. Which was completely out of place.

And an Oscar for looking at your shoes, saying nothing and punching guys in bars. Haven't seen Fences yet but no wonder Denzil was fizzing.
Image So Long Kid, Take A Bow.

User avatar
Darkness_Fish
Posts: 4013
Joined: 27 Jul 2015, 09:58

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Darkness_Fish » 19 Mar 2017, 20:20

Image

I tend to think the original is fondly remembered, rather than actually being particularly funny or well-written, so I didn't have much in the way of expectations for this. I think it's probably quite a bit sharper, funnier, and has more of an edge to it than the original, though it loses its way when it actually has to start doing the blockbuster film thing and having lots of whizzy CGI. Still, quite good.
Saving my holier-than-thou nonsense for a more deserving cause since '82

User avatar
Matt Wilson
Psychedelic Cowpunk
Posts: 28391
Joined: 16 Jul 2003, 20:18
Location: Edge of a continent

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Matt Wilson » 20 Mar 2017, 02:19

Image
Colors

Dennis Hopper directed this and I've always liked it. I had no idea in 1988, when I first saw it, that I would be working as a teacher in South Central in the same neighborhoods where this was filmed (well, not really, but damn close). It's neither Duvall's nor Penn's best performance but it seems real enough. The bangers say "homes" too much (or maybe they did that in the eighties, I don't know), and some of the dialogue seems a bit too Hollywood, but the feel is there. This was the first LA gang movie I can remember. There would be many more.

User avatar
PresMuffley
Posts: 896
Joined: 06 Feb 2017, 12:00

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby PresMuffley » 20 Mar 2017, 08:38

Matt Wilson wrote:
PresMuffley wrote: No. That would be Running on Empty opposite the equally wonderful Martha Plimpton.


Saw that back in the eighties, barely remember it. His only nominated performance.


Sounds like it's time to revisit. They were a couple in real life at the time which brings a level of authenticity to their film relationship that is rare. The entire cast is great, though. I'm almost certain you'll enjoy.
Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room.

User avatar
pcqgod
Posts: 15857
Joined: 11 Apr 2010, 07:23
Location: Texas

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby pcqgod » 20 Mar 2017, 15:07

Image

Trumbo (2015)

Fascinating and entertaining story of the blacklisted screenwriter's attempts to keep his writing career afloat during the red scare years. Typically great performances from the excellent cast.

Image

Vice (2015)

The premise to 'Vice' is in every respect identical to that of HBO's "Westworld" television series, except for the "West" part. Identical! The story derived from that premise seems mainly to be running around and intermittent gunfire, so kind of a blown opportunity.

Image

Logan (2017)

This movie is fairly entertaining as a pure action/adventure kind of thing. The story is terribly bleak, I think, and kind of falls into that "Dark Knight Returns" pattern of an aging superhero having his final hurrah at a time when all his former enemies and allies are dead or retired and a new generation of hero is set to take over. The film makers take advantage of the R rating and for the first time we truly see Wolverine mess up people with his claws (which can be kind of horrifying, actually) and the "hard" language seemed a little overdone. I figure this is the kind of movie that people into dark/violent comics will immediately proclaim an "important film," but personally I always preferred the hopeful philosophy that X-Men comics and movies have always espoused. This movie effectively ends the X-Men series, but clearly it is just one more soft reboot away from another revival.
Where would rock 'n' roll be without feedback?

User avatar
Snarfyguy
Dominated by the Obscure
Posts: 52124
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 19:04
Location: New York

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Snarfyguy » 20 Mar 2017, 16:16

Image

Apologies for the cribbed review.

Made in 1969, the same year The Rolling Stones' Altamont concert illustrated the dark undercurrent beneath the utopian dreams of the '60s, Coming Apart is a moody drama about a married psychoanalyst (Rip Torn) who rents out an apartment for his various indiscretions. There, Torn installs a secret camera to record moments from his life, and the film is presented as footage taken from that camera. At first, the camera is used for conventional, voyeuristic purposes, but as his mental health and composure decline, the camera (and by extension, the film) betrays Torn's overtly masochistic desire for self-incrimination.

Coming Apart's secret-camera gimmick proves tremendously limiting, but it's also an audacious stylistic choice that lends the film a harrowing, claustrophobic intensity that can be almost unbearable. Written and directed by Milton Moses Ginsberg (whose only other film as a director is the less-than-revered Werewolf Of Washington), Coming Apart derives much of its dramatic and narrative tension from the power imbalances that epitomize Torn's relationships. Many of his lovers (whose ranks include Sally Kirkland) share a mile-wide masochistic streak, and while Torn starts out in control, his authority gradually dissipates as he lurches toward madness.

Very much a product of its time—and essentially unseen since its brief original New York run—Coming Apart has a lot to recommend it. Torn gives a bravura lead performance, the use of original music is effective and creepy, and the sex scenes are painfully, uncomfortably intimate, far closer to real life than the bloodless abstractions offered by most Hollywood films. At the same time, Ginsberg relies too heavily on the claustrophobic power of his central gimmick, as well as Torn's formidable presence, to compensate for the shakiness of his uneven and sometimes embarassing dialogue. Coming Apart is harrowing and disconcertingly original, if self-indulgent and formless. A noble, if not entirely successful, experiment that promises more than it can deliver, it's a fascinating, frustrating time capsule that too often lapses into tedium.

http://www.avclub.com/review/coming-apart-19921
Jimbo wrote:Look, all I know is pretty much what I get from Robert Parry over at Consortium News.

User avatar
Schiz-Ke-Bab
Posts: 80
Joined: 06 Feb 2017, 15:09

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Schiz-Ke-Bab » 20 Mar 2017, 17:13

Image
"And today I ain't sellin' any... so take your flunky and dangle."

User avatar
Darkness_Fish
Posts: 4013
Joined: 27 Jul 2015, 09:58

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Darkness_Fish » 20 Mar 2017, 20:16

Schiz-Ke-Bab wrote:Image

I love that film, despite the obvious geographical problems, I think the effects still hold up quite well, too, for the most part. I wish I had a local pub as friendly and welcoming as The Slaughtered Lamb, too.
Saving my holier-than-thou nonsense for a more deserving cause since '82

User avatar
Jeemo
Posts: 20168
Joined: 21 Jul 2003, 23:17
Location: ????

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Jeemo » 20 Mar 2017, 23:48

jimboo wrote:
PresMuffley wrote:
pcqgod wrote:Image

Fail-Safe (1964)

This one was somewhat disappointing after hearing about how great this movie was since I was a boy -- even my dad was a fan. The premise of a mechanical goof sending a flight of bombers to Russia is gripping, but the set-up is filled with so many improbabilities and contrivances it seemed more like a long "Twilight Zone" episode, complete with the moralizing at the end, than a realistic international thriller. Still, it has its moments.


Yeah, I was bummed by that one. Total snoozefest.


Oh , just me likes it then.


I liked it as well.
Image So Long Kid, Take A Bow.

User avatar
PresMuffley
Posts: 896
Joined: 06 Feb 2017, 12:00

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby PresMuffley » 21 Mar 2017, 00:14

Snarfyguy wrote:Image

Apologies for the cribbed review.

Made in 1969, the same year The Rolling Stones' Altamont concert illustrated the dark undercurrent beneath the utopian dreams of the '60s, Coming Apart is a moody drama about a married psychoanalyst (Rip Torn) who rents out an apartment for his various indiscretions. There, Torn installs a secret camera to record moments from his life, and the film is presented as footage taken from that camera. At first, the camera is used for conventional, voyeuristic purposes, but as his mental health and composure decline, the camera (and by extension, the film) betrays Torn's overtly masochistic desire for self-incrimination.

Coming Apart's secret-camera gimmick proves tremendously limiting, but it's also an audacious stylistic choice that lends the film a harrowing, claustrophobic intensity that can be almost unbearable. Written and directed by Milton Moses Ginsberg (whose only other film as a director is the less-than-revered Werewolf Of Washington), Coming Apart derives much of its dramatic and narrative tension from the power imbalances that epitomize Torn's relationships. Many of his lovers (whose ranks include Sally Kirkland) share a mile-wide masochistic streak, and while Torn starts out in control, his authority gradually dissipates as he lurches toward madness.

Very much a product of its time—and essentially unseen since its brief original New York run—Coming Apart has a lot to recommend it. Torn gives a bravura lead performance, the use of original music is effective and creepy, and the sex scenes are painfully, uncomfortably intimate, far closer to real life than the bloodless abstractions offered by most Hollywood films. At the same time, Ginsberg relies too heavily on the claustrophobic power of his central gimmick, as well as Torn's formidable presence, to compensate for the shakiness of his uneven and sometimes embarassing dialogue. Coming Apart is harrowing and disconcertingly original, if self-indulgent and formless. A noble, if not entirely successful, experiment that promises more than it can deliver, it's a fascinating, frustrating time capsule that too often lapses into tedium.

http://www.avclub.com/review/coming-apart-19921


Whenever I see Rip I think of this (apologies if you've seen it).

Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room.

User avatar
fire and fueryIre
Posts: 8749
Joined: 04 May 2011, 02:57
Location: Accredited BCB Pain in the Arse

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby fire and fueryIre » 21 Mar 2017, 09:08

Jeemo wrote:
jimboo wrote:
PresMuffley wrote:
Yeah, I was bummed by that one. Total snoozefest.


Oh , just me likes it then.


I liked it as well.


Haven't seen FS for years, but I remember it as being pretty good.

Re the Rod Serling comment above, didn't RS write an early draft of this or was that a similar film - 13 days in May perchance?

EDIT: Just looked RS up, the film whose script he worked on was in fact 7 Days in May
Image

User avatar
fire and fueryIre
Posts: 8749
Joined: 04 May 2011, 02:57
Location: Accredited BCB Pain in the Arse

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby fire and fueryIre » 21 Mar 2017, 09:13

pcqgod wrote:[
Image

Logan (2017)

This movie is fairly entertaining as a pure action/adventure kind of thing. The story is terribly bleak, I think, and kind of falls into that "Dark Knight Returns" pattern of an aging superhero having his final hurrah at a time when all his former enemies and allies are dead or retired and a new generation of hero is set to take over. The film makers take advantage of the R rating and for the first time we truly see Wolverine mess up people with his claws (which can be kind of horrifying, actually) and the "hard" language seemed a little overdone. I figure this is the kind of movie that people into dark/violent comics will immediately proclaim an "important film," but personally I always preferred the hopeful philosophy that X-Men comics and movies have always espoused. This movie effectively ends the X-Men series, but clearly it is just one more soft reboot away from another revival.


While normally no great fan of superhero films, caught this in Sunday before catching a flight back from HK (it was this or go to the pub and I really hate getting on planes after a few drinks nowadays) and really rather enjoyed it.

Other film (of the 13) I saw while either in or flying to or from HK last week that I thgouht was pretty good - if about 30 minutes too long (why can't people make films of less than 120 minutes nowadays?) was Miss Sloane
Image

User avatar
fire and fueryIre
Posts: 8749
Joined: 04 May 2011, 02:57
Location: Accredited BCB Pain in the Arse

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby fire and fueryIre » 21 Mar 2017, 09:16

jimboo wrote:
Goat Boy wrote:Image

It's an odd movie. Like a Hollywood attempt at a European art house flick with pulpy undertones (its theme of middle class ennui is right out of european cinema of the time). It bombed on release and presumably including Rock Hudson probably contributed to audiences expectations being wildly unfulfilled but it is great and haunting. There is quality throughout: James Wong Howe superb cinematography, all weird angles and extreme, slightly grotesque closes up brilliantly accentuates the disorienting weirdness of the story; Rock Hudson is excellent as the middle aged man presented with a second chance at life and Will Greer is marvelously contained as the ruthless owner of the "company"; Jerry Goldsmiths score is terrific; Saul Bass' intro is superb and the ending is one of the great downer endings in film. Highly recommended


I would love to see this , where did you get your copy Dougie ?


Legend has it that the opening lines of this ("Good evening, Mr Wilson") apparently contributed to Brian Wilson's mid-60s meltdown

EDIT (From Wikipedia)

Historical context[edit]
John Frankenheimer directed Seconds just after the period he worked on his most notable films, Birdman of Alcatraz (1962), The Manchurian Candidate (1962), and Seven Days in May (1964). These last two films together with Seconds are sometimes known as Frankenheimer's paranoia trilogy.[6]

The "reborns"[6] of the plot are ironically paralleled in a different context—three of the principal actors (Jeff Corey, Will Geer, and John Randolph) were proscribed from Hollywood films during the "Blacklist" years of the 1950s.[9]

Seconds is also known for its connection to American songwriter Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys, who was strongly affected by the film during sessions for the concept album Smile. After arriving late to the theater, he appeared to be greeted with the onscreen dialogue, "Come in, Mr. Wilson," believing for some time that the film was directly based on his recent traumatic experiences and intellectual pursuits, going so far as to note that "even the beach was in it, a whole thing about the beach."[10][11] Wilson soon after ceased Smile recording sessions for the next several decades. The movie reportedly frightened him so much that it wouldn't be until 1982's E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial that he'd ever visit a movie theater again.[12]
Image

User avatar
Goat Boy
Bogarting the joint
Posts: 30442
Joined: 20 Mar 2007, 12:11
Location: In the perfumed garden

Re: Return of the RECENT VIEWING

Postby Goat Boy » 22 Mar 2017, 11:38

Die Hard

One of those rare action movies that actually manages to balance the humour and action brilliantly. Willis is great, the action is superlative and Rickman is magnificent. Never bettered really even if that ending when the dude reappears despite having been last seen hanging from the roof is ridiculous.


Boyhood - 2014

It’s one of those funny quirks of life that the things you often remember are not necessarily the “important” things. What we see in Boyhood is a series of memories and snapshots, some important, some seemingly trivial but they all have some kind of significance even if Mason doesn’t realise this at the time. So we see typical childhood moments like Mason discovering a dead bird (ahhh, mortality!) or getting a dodgy haircut that he hates or using a spray can to graffiti a wall (seemingly trivial but given Masons later interest in art and photography given resonance, as in the real world, by time). We also see bigger moments like Mason leaving his first best friend behind without getting the chance to properly say goodbye (that scene really hit home I have to say) and Mason finding his mother on the floor of their garage after his alcoholic step father has hit her. Life continues to move on for everybody involved and the cumulative effect of these moments continues to build. We also see the changes in those around Mason. His mothers journey from young single parent to respected teacher and his Fathers journey from rock n roll stoner type to middle aged Father (again) working for an insurance company. There’s a moving scene where some Mexican kid who was given advice by Masons mother years ago thanks her for changing the direction of his life. Of course she didn’t know at the time that’s what she’d done and neither did the Mexican kid obviously but sometimes casual, fleeting moments can have the most significance even if we can’t possibly understand that at the time. The movie has these profound little scenes. By the end Mason is an adult who’s found his voice and is now heading off to college. His boyhood is now over and the next chapter awaits, as it does for his Mother who bemoans the speed of life. Patricia Arquette (fantastic by the way) breaks down when Mason leaves for college. Mason doesn’t quite understand his mothers reaction of course in the same way that I didn’t really understand my Mother crying her eyes out when I left for university all those years ago. One day, perhaps, Mason will experience something similar. It’s a long movie, epic in scope but intimate and small in execution. The ending is perhaps a bit contrived but it’s minor criticism. It’s a perceptive film full of humanity and the kind of gentle profundity only time can bestow. I think it might be great.
German Dave wrote:Have a long hard look in the mirror will you