Anthology of American Folk Music

BCBers plug your own band, label, radio show, magazine, website here along with other stuff that might be interesting.
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 25 Jun 2014, 14:58

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Charlie Haden 1937-2014

GROSS: Let's get back to our 2008 interview with jazz bassist Charlie Haden, after he released an album called "Rambling Boy," which returned to his country music roots.

Charlie, the last track on your CD is you singing, and people who have followed your career know that although you sang as a boy with your family on their country music radio show, polio affected your voice and your vocal cords and stopped you from singing. But a few years ago, you recorded a track again, "Wayfaring Stranger," and you sing again on the final track on this CD. And the song is "Shenandoah," which is also the name of the place where you were born. This kind of tears me up every time I hear it. Tell me why you chose this song as the one that you would sing on the CD and what this song means to you.

Mr. CHARLIE HADEN: It means a tribute to my parents who were traveling around the United States before I was born, auditioning on all the big radio stations with my brothers and sister. And they were on their way to Des Moines, Iowa, do an audition, and there was a blizzard, and they stopped in Shenandoah at a motel. And while we were there, my dad went over to the radio station in Shenandoah and auditioned and got the job. And they stayed in Shenandoah for four years, and that's where I was born, and that's where I started singing with them.

And the two rare times I've sung since, you know, I've been in contemporary music is the "Wayfaring Stranger," which was with Quartet West and Shirley Horn, and Strings.

And then this time, and they were both a tribute to my parents. I don't sing these songs as a singer. I sing it in tribute and thanking my mom and dad for making this music and creating this music and my being a part of it and it being inside my soul. And I want to thank them, you know, whenever I can thank them. And this is the way that I can thank them because I know they hear this -they hear this. So that's why.

GROSS: You know, I always say that you're the most melodic and emotional bass player I've ever heard. And I think that that must have something to do with the fact that you grew up with this - that you grew up with melody and harmony and songs about life and death and love and loss. I mean, that's just - it's so deep inside of you.

Mr. CHARLIE HADEN: Yes. The music, you know, both of the indigenous art forms in music that come to the United States, you know, hillbilly music and folk music came over from England and Scotland and Ireland into the Appalachian Mountains and the Ozark Mountains where I was raised. And then, my attraction to jazz was, of course, the struggle of the African slave and the Underground Railroad and the music that evolved from that struggle.

And it seems like, you know, beautiful music, if it's from the United States or wherever it is, it can be from Bulgaria, it can be from Spain, it can it comes from a struggle, you know, of people either in poverty or trying to a struggle for freedom. And so this music is very, very melodic. It's filled with wonderful chords and voicings and harmonies, and I grew up with these harmonies. And I'm so lucky because this was my early musical education, and I feel very fortunate.

GROSS: Just one more thing about your singing. I know there was a long period when you physically couldn't sing because of the polio that you got when you were young. When you sing now, what does it feel like physically to sing?

Mr. CHARLIE HADEN: It's very difficult for me because intonation is one of the priorities in my life is to play the music in tune, and I don't use my voice every day the way a lot of singers do, you know, who are professional singers. When I did the "Wayfaring Stranger," I hadn't sung in 40 years or whatever, you know, since I was 15. And so - and I didn't practice, you know. And so I got in the studio and just sang. And it was - I think I did one take or maybe two. And on "Shenandoah," I was kind of nervous because I wanted to be in tune, and then I started thinking, you know, I'm doing this for Mom and Dad. I'm not doing this, you know, to be a great singer. I just want to do this, and so I just relaxed and did it. But whatever.

GROSS: Well, I find it incredibly moving and I'm so glad that you sang it. So, let's hear Charlie Haden singing "Shenandoah" from his new CD, "Charlie Haden: Family and Friends." And Charlie, it's just been great to have you back on the show and to talk with your family. Thank you so very much.

Mr. CHARLIE HADEN: Thank you, Terry, so much for inviting us.

http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript ... =129476067




Charlie Haden, Wayfaring Stranger, 1999, from The Art of Song
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErhpYoXA4Dk


I'm a poor wayfaring stranger
While traveling thru this world of woe
Yet there's no sickness, toil, or danger
In that bright world to which I go
I'm going there to see my Father
I'm going there no more to roam
I'm only going over Jordan
I'm only going over home

I know dark clouds will hang 'round me,
I know my way is rough and steep
Yet beauteous fields lie just before me
Where God's redeemed their virgils keep
I'm going there to see my mother
She said she'd meet me when I come
I'm only going over Jordan
I'm only going over home


Regarding how Charlie Haden came to sing "Wayfaring Stranger"


I saved for last what I think may be the most moving example of someone singing a little during a Fresh Air interview. I was talking to the great jazz bass player and composer Charlie Haden in 1997 after the release of his Quartet West album "Now Is the Hour." The title track is the farewell song of the Maori people of New Zealand, but Charlie Haden new it as a pop song on the radio during World War II, when it became about waiting for soldiers who had gone to war. The Quartet West track is an instrumental, but I wanted to hear the lyrics.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

GROSS: Would you sing the song as you remembered it?

CHARLIE HADEN: Well, I'll try. (Singing) Now is the hour when we must say goodbye. Soon you'll be singing far across the sea. While you're away oh then remember me. When you return you'll find me waiting here.

GROSS: That's a really lovely song.

HADEN: Yeah.

GROSS: Charlie Haden, recorded on FRESH AIR in 1997. I'd never heard him sing before. I later learned it was the first time he sang in public in 45 years. As a child, he sang on his parents' country music radio show, when he stopped singing at the age of 15 after polio temporarily paralyzed the left side of his face and his vocal cords.

According to the liner notes Orrin Keepnews wrote for a Haden album two years after our interview, it was because I persuaded him to sing on FRESH AIR and then urged him to sing on his next album that he actually did. He sang "Wayfaring Stranger" on his 1999 album "The Art of Song." I can't tell you how proud that makes me because I love Charlie Haden's singing.

http://nhpr.org/post/fresh-air-25-live-musical-tribute


http://nhpr.org/post/fresh-air-25-live-musical-tribute
Charlie Haden sings at about the 28:00 minute mark on the webpage above.


I cannot locate a transcript of the 1999 interview, but in it, Haden talks about the recording sessions and how he had to "convince" his manager to let him sing on the recording.

He still wasn't quite sure of the result. The great pianist and vocalist Shirley Horn, who is also on the record, was listening along with the other musicians to the playback and told him, "Charlie, everyone in the string section is crying..."


Bill Frisell, Embraceable You, 2013?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEHdvZD5jFc


Jon Cleary, History of New Orleans Piano
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wi0cLdJCgTA




Bill Kirchen, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oy-gXAvPYTU

Note the references to Charlie McCoy's guitar playing on "Desolation Row".


Bill Kirchen with Arlen Roth, Lonesome Fugitive (Merle Haggard)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woUhwS2uPeI

Not an example of humor, but here's another live track which I prefer to Gram Parsons and Emmylou.


Bill Kirchen, Streets of Baltimore
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hf1Zp7-hKCM

The loud and inattentive audience somehow makes the rendition more moving. It's almost as if they were playing "Lodi" instead
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby kath » 27 Jun 2014, 19:30

please do not stop. i am hopskipjumpin around this thread with much enjoyment. (i think the fripp tv show with his wife is beyond sweet, by the way.) whatever you posted in the last post, i cannot see.

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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 27 Jun 2014, 20:29

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Just when you think you've figured out Fripp, he does something like this.

Here's another clip of Fripp talking about future editions of King Crimson. See from about 5:50 to the end.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2MHNGDTt-U

I don't know King Crimson well at all, but I'm struck by his enthusiasm. I think this is a common trait among real musicians, that is, how much they enjoy being around music and thinking about it. It's an antidote to see something like this.


space reserved for future clip

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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 27 Jun 2014, 20:30

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Muddy Waters, I Can't Be Satisfied
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSF-T5gwdxU



Captain Beefheart, China Pig
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5IwK28tVwE


James Brown and the Famous Flames, The TAMI Show, 1964
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_jqhXNF98A
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 27 Jun 2014, 20:30

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Edgard Varese, Poeme electronique
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmrchX7qYpU

Rolling Stone: How much of a group effort are the songs? Pete brings you demos on which he's played all the parts. How much do you change those demos when you record?

Keith Moon: Not a hell of a lot. Because Pete knows. When Pete writes something, it sounds like the Who. The drum phrases are my phrases, even though it's Pete playing drums. He's playing the way I play. He's playing my flourishes. The same thing for the bass part, and the guitar, of course, is his own. Only the vocals change some.

http://beta.thewho.net/bibliography/art ... ith72.html



Pete Townshend, Baba O'Riley
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh4wkMZXONc



The Who, Baba O'Riley
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2KRpRMSu4g


Terry Riley, In C
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjR4QYsa9nE



Pete Townshend, Won't Get Fooled Again
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwSP_gh8VvI


The Who, Won't Get Fooled Again
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHhrZgojY1Q

Townshend: The most interesting aspect about Keith was the excellence of his mind, the rapidity of his memory. You often find this with drummers, that they have the most extraordinary memories. It's an extension of their work. Maybe their memories are centered in a different part of the brain, because they have to remember long musical phrases as pure data. It's almost binary. They must know exactly where they are in a song at any given time. The best drummers have the best memories. (Musician, 1989)
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 27 Jun 2014, 20:31

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Roger Ebert, Remaking My Voice
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNXOVpN8Wgg

He's a soldier of cinema who cannot even speak anymore, and he ploughs on...

--Werner Herzog




Steve James's documentary on Roger Ebert, Life Itself (trailer)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9ud1HUHgug

Several, different reasons why people might be interested in the film:

1. to compare it to Steve James's other work, e.g., Hoop Dreams.

2. interested in the history of Chicago.

3. know Ebert's work and want more of a context. (See also the famous Esquire article at http://www.esquire.com/features/roger-ebert-0310 for something of a print analog to the film.)

4. want to compare it to other similar documentaries about artists facing serious illnesses, like Marion Cajori's "Chuck Close: A Portrait in Progress" A shorter, earlier edition is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRfe1skdQfA .

5. want a film that actually deals realistically with illness, regardless of whether the subject is an artist or not.

There's another reason that I can't fit in easily into a bullet point, and that is that what Ebert did in the last few years of his life is one of the most remarkable uses of celebrity I've ever seen. I know he didn't mean for it to be performance art, but in one sense, it is, albeit on a very grand scale, not unlike what you get in the Up series, which he regarded as one of the best documentaries. The 49 edition has Ebert interviewing Apted.


Given the limited theatrical release, you probably won't be able to see it in theatres


There is a full listing of where it's playing at: http://www.rogerebert.com/life-itself/w ... ife-itself
Also available on demand .




Roger Ebert, Gene Siskel on Later, 1992
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=td_K-7MSgc0
Note Siskel's response at 7:22


A 40 minute interview (Fresh Air, NPR) with Steve James and Chaz Ebert at

http://www.npr.org/programs/fresh-air/2 ... 2014-07-03

It's extensive and supplements a lot of material hinted at in the movie.


Regarding the relationship between sparring partners:
Roger Ebert wrote:There is also an enigma to consider: the relationship of Bogan and Armstrong, who have known each other and played together for almost 70 years, despite the fact that Armstrong is almost always on Bogan's case, and Bogan's eyes always seem to be looking for the nearest exit. "Louie Bluie" peers into the areas where nothing is certain, except that these people live and strive and laugh and make music. It is a wonderful film.

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/louie-bluie-1986



Terry Zwigoff, Louie Bluie, part 1
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HlpXGphSGw
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 08 Jul 2014, 21:02

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Levels of obsession with music

On one hand, a lot of us would probably categorize ourselves as being obsessed with music. At the same time, a lot of us would also probably make fun of let's say, elements of the Hoffman board for being too obsessed.

Which, of course, makes you wonder about examples beyond here or Hoffman.


This and this seem to be examples far beyond what anyone here or probably at Hoffman has done. It's one thing to post often about music. It's another thing to spend tens of thousands on one 78 rpm disc. That has to be several times more than the profit generated by the release. I'm sure the object retains a certain value on its own, but the idea of having to go into debt in order to pursue this goal is beyond what I would do. On the other hand, the King Solomon Hill record, in particular, is really good. It's a beautiful tribute to, I'm presuming, Blind Lemon Jefferson.

(links: http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/am ... d=14146401 and
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/12/arts/ ... d=all&_r=0 )


King Solomon Hill, My Buddy, Blind Papa Lemon
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkE2VhoeZXE


King Solomon Hill, Times Has Done Got Hard
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUsZer_choE


Son House, Clarksdale Moan
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCr2lBBPiGQ

Toby wrote:I'm curious to know what people's views here are on formats as a whole - both physical and digital.


What formats are suitable or optimal depends on the medium, yes? The photobook (e.g., Diane Arbus monograph) is popular because photographs work better in books than in most other formats. Have we found screens yet that can depict the resolution you can achieve in a good quality book? I haven't.

Note that this argument doesn't apply to necessarily to print (because alphabets are discrete) although it might be relevant to music. It also doesn't take into account how a collection's use of space, itself, can mean something. This may sound silly, but it isn't as easy to dismiss as you might think.

In general, the relationship between collectors and their collections is pretty complicated. I don't think I can improve on the essay below so I'll just quote the opening here and provide a link to the rest.

Unpacking My Library
by Walter Benjamin


I am unpacking my library. Yes, I am. The books are not yet on the shelves, not yet touched by the mild boredom of order. I cannot march up and down their ranks to pass them in review before a friendly audience. You need not fear any of that. Instead, I must ask you to join me in the disorder of crates that have been wrenched open...


http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/23538
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 08 Jul 2014, 21:02

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Fred Hersch, Jane Ira Bloom, The ARt of the Ballad
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zznlnwdnj1k
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 08 Jul 2014, 21:03

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Great musicians who could have joined great bands.

Ahmad Jamal in the first Miles Davis Quintet. See Davis's autobiography for evidence.



Ahmad Jamal, Billy Boy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFYqAGZMM58

In June of 1955 I took a quartet into the studio for my next record for Bob Weinstock. Becuase I wanted to find a piano player who played like Ahmad Jamal, I decided to use Red Garland.

--Miles Davis, Miles (autobiography), page 190



Miles Davis, Bye Bye Blackbird
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2fJO1BrTEM



Red Garland with Miles Davis Quintet, Billy Boy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3UnzDeZ8lI
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 08 Jul 2014, 21:03

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Q: Were The Beatles mediocre as musicians?

A: Among a rather small subset, this sort of revisionism is popular.

Here's


The Beatles - All My Loving Live at Washington
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gafHZjHhDc

Is the tune in 4/4 or 12/8? It all depends on whether you are listening to Harrison or Lennon.

Note that this is essentially the same question that this track poses


Chuck Berry, Let It Rock
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qzLd7Kg7XU

Chuck is in 4/4. Johnnie is in 12/8. "All My Loving" usually isn't thought of as a Chuck Berry tribute but that's because many listeners can't get beyond the notion of Chuck Berry as the opening riff to "Johnny B. Goode" when he's as much about the interplay between 2 and 3. That's what Charlie Parker was about as well, especially on ballads. That's why, according to Barry Harris, no one sounds like Bird. No one sounds like Chuck Berry either. The only way to get to his sound is in a roundabout way as The Beatles did.
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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby Neige » 10 Jul 2014, 10:00

kath wrote:please do not stop. i am hopskipjumpin around this thread with much enjoyment.



What kath said: I just discovered this thread, there's an awful lot of great interest to me here already. I long to get home from work to peruse and I'm looking forward to what you'll come up with next.
Thumpety-thump beats plinkety-plonk every time. - Rayge

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Re: semi-random stuff

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 10 Jul 2014, 16:36

Neige wrote:
kath wrote:please do not stop. i am hopskipjumpin around this thread with much enjoyment.



What kath said: I just discovered this thread, there's an awful lot of great interest to me here already. I long to get home from work to peruse and I'm looking forward to what you'll come up with next.


I set up the thread initially as a place to put clips that I had quoted in other posts. (The trailer for the Ebert documentary is one example.) Clearly, they aren't my work. However, the way in which one clip is positioned next to another is. At any rate, "My Way," which is usually set up for more deliberate things that people have made seemed like a good place to put this stuff. It's quiet and out of the way so it doesn't interfere with other threads.

One way of approaching this thread is as if it were a radio program. Of course, you can hear it in any order you want to, but things have been put in a specific order for reasons that I usually don't explain.

The first page takes a long time to load because there are so many videos. I'll think about ways to fix this.


Interested in knowing if anyone else wants to set up their own particular thread of clips that they enjoy. I would certainly be interested in hearing what some other posters think constitutes a collection of good clips.

Neige? kath?

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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 14 Jul 2014, 21:52

Comedy and technical facility in music...namely the correlation between the two. A disproportionate number of performers who have above average technical facility also develop stage acts that feature a fair amount of comedy. Or perhaps it's that some comedians use technical facility as a means of getting laughs.

Examples off the top of my head are

Spike Jones
David Lindley
Richard Thompson


Martha Davis, Martha's Boogie
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DKaSoxJ43A

Other examples?

The humor seems predicated on the technical facility. Without it, there'd be no reason to laugh. Note also how this provides a real counterexample to the notion that all comedy is about laughing at someone else's misfortune. Something very different is happening here. What's going on?
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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 14 Jul 2014, 21:53

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Quaco wrote: What West Groups groups were doing what The Beatles were doing?


If you're willing to categorize Getz as West Coast jazz, then you may be able to go from


Gilberto, the Girl from Ipanema (originally recorded in 1963)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJkxFhFRFDA

to


The Beatles, And I Love Her, 1964
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm4YlZ3oYsQ

but it's really Joao's guitar on the original that makes the connection. Note as well the black-and-white decor. Hard to tell which visual style influenced which since both performances are from 1964.

Having drawn this link though, I would also say that the influence of bossa nova and other clave-type rhythms on The Beatles (and on other acts in the British Invasion) is quite subtle. Anyone who calls it "plagiarism" doesn't know what bossa nova is.

Note that if you play one track right after the other that the last note Astrud sings segues perfectly with the riff that Harrison plays. It's Ab major to its relative minor.
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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 14 Jul 2014, 21:53

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Not sure which is more surprising

1)


Robert Fripp discussing Willifred
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=64VGyoIyBgc

2)


Amy Winehouse discussing the Fender Stratocaster
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9bG6Q5rPJY



Or consider the satire and its alleged target

a)


Spinal Tap in Legos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=At887GsraAQ

b)


Jeff Beck Guitar Collection
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YB9EX7YpFk


At their worst, guitars--and specifically electric guitars--can be an exercise in the most blatant type of consumerism there is. (That's really what Rob Reiner and Christopher Guest were making fun of.) You are turned into the perfect consumer, perfect, that is, to Fender or Gibson or Marshall or whatever company is pushing its gear onto you. You become programmed to buy and buy instead of dealing with the music.

However, guitars also have the ability to cut across expectations. If you sit down a famous musician and ask them to talk about guitars, they will probably surprise you. Jeff Beck never plays Scotty Moore or Cliff Gallup riffs in his stadium shows even though he should. He's also a die-hard Les Paul aficionado, but you have to dig for this.

As for Amy Winehouse, it's just bizarre to hear her go on and on about Stratocasters. It makes you realize how limited the public persona is that most musicians present or, actually, how limited most media is. There's a lot more stuff going on than gets picked up in the papers. I can't recall a single article on Winehouse that mentioned anything about her interest in soul guitar (e.g., Shuggie Otis), but it's clearly there.


For more on Jeff Beck, see http://www.ijamming.net/Moon/JeffBeck.html . A brilliant interviewee.
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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 14 Jul 2014, 21:54

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Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares - Mir Stanke le
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXQ-eZqnVe0


Jeff Beck - Where Were You - (Live at Ronnie Scott's)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=howz7gVecjE
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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 14 Jul 2014, 21:54

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Everyone talks about how well-structured Pet Sounds is, but the Beach Boys' real talents were in the informal


Devoted to You
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-14o9oaBLbk


Little Pad
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5gyoIGPnZg


Bill Frisell, Surfer Girl
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnDZ7yb5g-c

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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 22 Jul 2014, 17:57

.

Note the similarity.


Big Star, When My Baby's Beside Me
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RhHavIAqGkU



Wilco, Monday
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwDzIwiTIbM

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take5_d_shorterer
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Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 22 Jul 2014, 17:58

.


William Eggleston (piano)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_Q1DWV3hhE



William Eggleston with Alex Chilton, Nature Boy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1phuIrU6sKY


Cherry, Coleman, Haden, and Higgins, Lonely Woman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNbD1JIH344
Last edited by take5_d_shorterer on 23 Jul 2014, 23:50, edited 1 time in total.

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take5_d_shorterer
Posts: 5602
Joined: 22 Sep 2003, 23:09
Location: photo. by Andor Kertesz, Hung.

Re: Anthology of American Folk Music

Postby take5_d_shorterer » 22 Jul 2014, 17:58

.