Recommend me some Music Books

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secondhandsocks

Recommend me some Music Books

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 09:59

Found my book token from Christmas the other day.
Any recommendations on good music books?

Something like a nice history of soul maybe?

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bhoywonder
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Postby bhoywonder » 10 Feb 2006, 10:25

Peter Guralnick's Sweet Soul Music is generally agreed to be the best history of soul. It's a suprb book, absolute solid class, as are all of his books. It's ne I go back to over and over.

secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 10:30

That looks perfect, I think I've seen you mention this before.
Does it carry on through the 70's?

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Postby bhoywonder » 10 Feb 2006, 10:37

Happiness Stan wrote:That looks perfect, I think I've seen you mention this before.
Does it carry on through the 70's?


Yup, although not all the way through, if I recall. Stops around 76, I think. There's an epilogue that flits over the and of the 70s and early 80s, but the story Guralnick tells pretty much comes to an end in the early 70s. Remember that he doesn't talk about Motown (obviously, as that's pop, not soul, right Goldwax? :wink: ), he traces the roots of soul and the associated society from the late 40s? or early 50s into the 60s and early 70s. His story is that of gospel and, to a lesser degree, blues which became secularised, hence soul. It's subtitled "Rhythm & Blues and the Southern Dream of Freedom", rather accurately. You will love it.

secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 10:43

Sounds great, thanks Bhoy.
In the interests of keeping this thread alive a little longer, any other recommendations?

I nearly said Ambient books as well but these have probably covered that fairly well:

Image

Ambient Century

Image

Ocean of Sound

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Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe
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Postby Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe » 10 Feb 2006, 10:57

Happiness Stan wrote:That looks perfect, I think I've seen you mention this before.
Does it carry on through the 70's?


I know you don't rate my opinion highly but I thought it was too dry to hold my interest. I only got around half way thorugh. Plus it was written about 20 years ago which somehow detracts. Over-rated. :wink:

secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 11:35

Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe wrote:I know you don't rate my opinion highly


substitute highly for at all.

Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe wrote:too dry to hold my interest.


pot, kettle

:wink:

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Postby Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe » 10 Feb 2006, 11:38

Happiness Stan wrote:
Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe wrote:I know you don't rate my opinion highly


substitute highly for at all.

Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe wrote:too dry to hold my interest.


pot, kettle

:wink:


Cnut.

Seriously though, after seeing all the praise for it here it was disappointing. Guralnick's Elvis books are much more interesting.

secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 11:39

Jimbo wrote:Have you read Dylan's Chronicles? I thought it would be weird, you know, Dylanish? But is is readable. funny, historical and worthy.


That's on my b-list for tonight if I can't find anything else.
I had figured Maxwell was going to lend it to me, but maybe not...
Still no news on book 2 I take it?

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Postby The Write Profile » 10 Feb 2006, 11:40

CHARLES SHAAR MURRAY- Crosstown Traffic

Now this you need, as it's recently been updated with a new introduction and extra chapter, and is currently going for a decent price in paperback. It starts off as a biography of Hendrix, but Murray uses it as a starting point to talk about the evolution of black popular music, particular in parallell to "rock", over the last three or four decades (the new introduction brings it up to present day- or 2005, at least). As much about our changing attitudes towards music as it is about the music itself. But what impressed me was the level of detail and knowledge Murray conveyed in an unfussy, nonpretentious manner, while still being very rigorous in his prose. It's a beautiful, revealing and sometimes very funny read.


Image

I'm also interested in Barney Hoskyns's book on the LA music "scene" in the 1970s. Not so much because that's my type of music (it isn't really), but there's some really fascinating stories to be told, and there's certainly enough ego, hubris and schadenfreude to last an entire book. Has anyone got it yet?

Simon Reynolds' Rip it Up And Start Again, though flawed (I wrote a long post on it ages ago) is worth picking up. Reynolds is an entertaining writer and he covers the postpunk period well, albeit without much critical detachment. It's essentially a series of very well written Mojo articles wound up in book length (mind you, it has more personal prejudices and vibrancy than anything that's appeared in the magazine in the last couple of years). Think of it as the junior followup to John Savage's classic treatise on punk, England's Dreaming

Gary Mulholland's This is Uncool is also good, if you want something with a difference, too. Essentially one man's tract on the modern single over the las 25 years, and how it got that way. Some good and slapdash writing in it, but the energy and attitude is all.

I'll think of some others, is it worth while reviving Tweetybird's old thread for you? There were some decent suggestions in that, too. Happy Reading!
Last edited by The Write Profile on 10 Feb 2006, 11:43, edited 2 times in total.
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secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 11:41

Maxwell's Golden Pickaxe wrote:Cnut.

Seriously though, after seeing all the praise for it here it was disappointing. Guralnick's Elvis books are much more interesting.


tee hee, only joshing.
now you know I'm not an Elvis fan, the book looks interesting enough, just not my bag, man.

secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 11:47

Image

That and Crosstown Traffic look fairly interesting, thanks RSP.

I enjoyed

Image

My copy is signed!
Well it's not really my copy, I must give it back.

but avoid

Image

at all costs, complete drivel.

secondhandsocks

Postby secondhandsocks » 10 Feb 2006, 13:04

Of course what I'd really like is Julian Cope's Krautrocksampler, anything out on these lines?

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Postby Sea Of Tunes » 10 Feb 2006, 13:10

Greil Marcus: 'Ranters And Crowd Pleasers'. Collection of essays, eminently readable, and better than the pretentious 'Lipstick Traces'

It has a different title in America, so if you are interested, think of this.
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Postby Arthur Crud » 10 Feb 2006, 14:38

Happiness Stan wrote:Of course what I'd really like is Julian Cope's Krautrocksampler, anything out on these lines?


it'll set you back a few quid but it's a blinder. And for free you could download his text on Danskrocksampler and find the comp somewhere :wink:

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Postby Strider » 10 Feb 2006, 15:17

the new Guralnick book "Dream Boogie" is an excellent biography of Sam Cooke.

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Postby Tactful Cactus » 10 Feb 2006, 15:22

The Right Summery Profile wrote:I'm also interested in Barney Hoskyns's book on the LA music "scene" in the 1970s. Not so much because that's my type of music (it isn't really), but there's some really fascinating stories to be told, and there's certainly enough ego, hubris and schadenfreude to last an entire book. Has anyone got it yet?


Yeah, that caught my eye too. He's already done a book on the LA music scene which was a great read, Waiting For the Sun, it covers the 50's to the 90's, with a heavy emphasis on 1966/7. Well worth a tenner.


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